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White House
The White House
White House
is the official residence and workplace of the President of the United States. It is located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams
John Adams
in 1800. The term is often used as a metonym for the president and his advisers. The residence was designed by Irish-born architect James Hoban[2] in the neoclassical style. Construction took place between 1792 and 1800 using Aquia Creek sandstone
Aquia Creek sandstone
painted white
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Colonnade
In classical architecture, a colonnade is a long sequence of columns joined by their entablature, often free-standing, or part of a building.[1] Paired or multiple pairs of columns are normally employed in a colonnade which can be straight or curved. The space enclosed may be covered or open. In St. Peter's Square
St. Peter's Square
in Rome, Bernini's great colonnade encloses a vast open elliptical space. When in front of a building, screening the door (Latin porta), it is called a portico, when enclosing an open court, a peristyle. A portico may be more than one rank of columns deep, as at the Pantheon in Rome or the stoae of Ancient Greece. Colonnades have been built since ancient times and interpretations of the classical model have continued through to modern times, and Neoclassical styles remained popular for centuries.[2] At the British Museum, for example, porticos are continued along the front as a colonnade
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Attic
An attic (sometimes referred to as a loft) is a space found directly below the pitched roof of a house or other building; an attic may also be called a sky parlor[1] or a garret. Because attics fill the space between the ceiling of the top floor of a building and the slanted roof, they are known for being awkwardly shaped spaces with exposed rafters and difficult-to-reach corners. While some attics are converted into bedrooms, home offices, or attic apartments complete with windows and staircases, most remain difficult to access (and are usually entered using a loft hatch and ladder). Attics are generally used for storage, though they can also help control temperatures in a house by providing a large mass of slowly moving air. The hot air rising from the lower floors of a building is often retained in attics, further compounding their reputation as inhospitable environments
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Hip Roof
A hip roof, hip-roof[1] or hipped roof, is a type of roof where all sides slope downwards to the walls, usually with a fairly gentle slope (although a tented roof by definition is a hipped roof with steeply pitched slopes rising to a peak). Thus a hipped roof house has no gables or other vertical sides to the roof. A square hip roof is shaped like a pyramid. Hip roofs on houses could have two triangular sides and two trapezoidal ones. A hip roof on a rectangular plan has four faces. They are almost always at the same pitch or slope, which makes them symmetrical about the centerlines. Hip roofs often have a consistent level fascia, meaning that a gutter can be fitted all around
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American Institute Of Architects
The American Institute of Architects
American Institute of Architects
(AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the AIA offers education, government advocacy, community redevelopment, and public outreach to support the architecture profession and improve its public image
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Steel Frame
Steel
Steel
frame is a building technique with a "skeleton frame" of vertical steel columns and horizontal I-beams, constructed in a rectangular grid to support the floors, roof and walls of a building which are all attached to the frame. The development of this technique made the construction of the skyscraper possible.Contents1 Concept 2 Cold formed steel frames 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksConcept[edit] The rolled steel "profile" or cross section of steel columns takes the shape of the letter "I". The two wide flanges of a column are thicker and wider than the flanges on a beam, to better withstand compressive stress in the structure. Square and round tubular sections of steel can also be used, often filled with concrete. Steel
Steel
beams are connected to the columns with bolts and threaded fasteners, and historically connected by rivets
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National Heritage Site (United States)
A National Heritage Site in the United States is a location important to the cultural heritage of a particular state that has been promoted to national status, as well as sites that have been deemed nationally important by central heritage agencies. Types of protection[edit]The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation. It includes the complete list of National Historic Landmarks. The National Park Service (NPS) is the U.S
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Northwest, Washington, D.C.
Northwest (NW or N.W.) is the northwestern quadrant of Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States, and is located north of the National Mall
National Mall
and west of North Capitol Street. It is the largest of the four quadrants of the city (NW, NE, SW and SE), and it includes the central business district, the Federal Triangle, and the museums along the northern side of the National Mall, as well as such neighborhoods as West End, Petworth, Dupont Circle, LeDroit Park, Georgetown, Adams Morgan, Embassy Row, Glover Park, Tenleytown, Foggy Bottom, Cleveland
Cleveland
Park, Columbia Heights, Mount Pleasant, the Palisades, Shepherd Park, Crestwood, Bloomingdale, Takoma, Chevy Chase, and Friendship Heights. Northwest contains many college campuses, including American University, George Washington University, Georgetown University, Howard University, and the University of the District of Columbia
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War Of 1812
Treaty of GhentMilitary stalemate; both sides' invasion attempts repulsed Status quo ante bellum Defeat of Tecumseh's ConfederacyBelligerents United StatesChoctaw Cherokee Creeks British Empire United Kingdom  The Canadas Tecumseh's Confederacy[1] Shawnee Creek Red Sticks Ojibwe Fox Iroquois Miami Mingo Ottawa Kickapoo Delaware (Lenape) Mascouten Potawatomi Sauk Wyandot Bourbon Spain Florida (1814)Commanders and leaders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson William Henry Harrison William H. Winder (POW) William Hull  (POW) Zebulon Pike † Oliver Hazard Perry Isaac Chauncey George, Prince Regent Lord Liverpool Sir George Prévost Sir Isaac Brock † Gordon Drummond Charles de Salaberry Roger Hale Sheaffe Robert Ross † Edward Pakenham † James FitzGibbon Alexander Cochrane James Lucas Yeo Tecumseh †StrengthU.S
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1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (other)
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue is the formal address of the White House, the United States presidential residence. 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue may also refer to:1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (musical), a 1976 musical with music by Leonard Bernstein and book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue (TV series), a panel show on MSNBC previously known as Race for the White House 1600 Penn, an NBC sitcom that aired from December 2012 to March 2013 about the dysfunctional family of a fictional US presidentThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Neoclassical Architecture
Neoclassical architecture
Neoclassical architecture
is an architectural style produced by the neoclassical movement that began in the mid-18th century. In its purest form, it is a style principally derived from the architecture of classical antiquity, the Vitruvian principles, and the work of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio.[1] In form, neoclassical architecture emphasizes the wall rather than chiaroscuro and maintains separate identities to each of its parts. The style is manifested both in its details as a reaction against the Rococo
Rococo
style of naturalistic ornament, and in its architectural formulae as an outgrowth of some classicising features of the Late Baroque
Baroque
architectural tradition
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America's Favorite Architecture
"America's Favorite Architecture" is a list of buildings and other structures identified as the most popular works of architecture in the United States. In 2006 and 2007, the American Institute of Architects
American Institute of Architects
(AIA) sponsored research to identify the most popular works of architecture in the United States. Harris Interactive
Harris Interactive
conducted the study by first polling a sample of the AIA membership and later polling a sample of the public.[1] In the first phase of the study, 2,448 AIA members were interviewed and asked to identify their "favorite" structures. Each was asked to name up to 20 structures in each of 15 defined categories. The 248 structures that were named by at least six of the AIA members were then included in a list of structures to be included in the next phase, a survey of the general public
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National Park Service
The National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.[1] It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service
National Park Service
Organic Act[2] and is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior
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George Washington
American Revolution Commander in Chief of the Continental ArmyValley Forge Battle of Trenton Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon
Conference 1787 Constitutional ConventionPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst term1788–89 election 1st inaugurationJudiciary Act Whiskey RebellionThanksgiving Presidential title Coinage Act Residence ActDistrict of ColumbiaSecond term1792 election 2nd inauguration Neutrality Act Jay TreatyJudicial appointments Farewell AddressLegacyLegacy Monuments Depictions Slavery Papers Library Bibliographyv t e George Washington
George Washington
(February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American statesman and soldier who served as the first President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1789 to 1797 and was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States
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