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Whip
A whip is a tool which was traditionally designed to strike animals or people to aid guidance or exert control over animals or other people, through pain compliance or fear of pain, although in some activities, whips can be used without use of pain, such as an additional pressure aid or visual directional cue in equestrianism. Whips are generally of two types, either a firm stick designed for direct contact, or a flexible whip that requires a specialized swing to be effective, but has a longer reach and greater force, but may have less precision. There are also whips which combine both a firm stick (the stock or handle) and a flexible line (the lash or thong), such as hunting whips. The majority of whips are designed for use on animals, although whips such as the "cat o' nine tails" and knout were specifically developed for flagellation as a means of inflicting corporal punishment or torture on human targets
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Sound Barrier
The sound barrier or sonic barrier is a popular term for the sudden increase in aerodynamic drag and other effects experienced by an aircraft or other object when it approaches supersonic speed. When aircraft first began to be able to reach close to supersonic speed, these effects were seen as constituting a barrier making supersonic speed very difficult or impossible.[3][4] In dry air at 20 °C (68 °F), the sound barrier is reached when an object moves at a speed of 343 metres per second (about 767 mph, 1234 km/h or 1,125 ft/s). The term came into use in this sense during World War II, when a number of aircraft started to encounter the effects of compressibility, a number of unrelated aerodynamic effects that "struck" their aircraft, seemingly impeding further acceleration
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Kangaroo
4 species, see text.The kangaroo is a marsupial from the family Macropodidae
Macropodidae
(macropods, meaning "large foot"). In common use the term is used to describe the largest species from this family, especially those of the genus Macropus: the red kangaroo, antilopine kangaroo, eastern grey kangaroo, and western grey kangaroo.[1] Kangaroos are indigenous to Australia. The Australian government estimates that 34.3 million kangaroos lived within the commercial harvest areas of Australia
Australia
in 2011, up from 25.1 million one year earlier.[2] As with the terms "wallaroo" and "wallaby", "kangaroo" refers to a polyphyletic grouping of species. All three refer to members of the same taxonomic family, Macropodidae, and are distinguished according to size. The largest species in the family are called "kangaroos" and the smallest are generally called "wallabies"
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Montana
Montana
Montana
/mɒnˈtænə/ ( listen) is a U.S. state
U.S. state
in the northwestern region of the United States. Montana
Montana
has several nicknames, although none official,[6] including "Big Sky Country" and "The Treasure State", and slogans that include "Land of the Shining Mountains" and more recently "The Last Best Place".[7] Montana
Montana
is the 4th largest in area, the 8th least populous, and the 3rd most sparsely populated of the 50 U.S. states. The western third of Montana
Montana
contains numerous mountain ranges. Smaller island ranges are found throughout the state. In total, 77 named ranges are part of the Rocky Mountains. The eastern half of Montana
Montana
is characterized by western prairie terrain and badlands. The economy is primarily based on agriculture, including ranching and cereal grain farming
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Mule
Equus mulusA grey muleA mule is the offspring of a male donkey (jack) and a female horse (mare).[1][2] Horses and donkeys are different species, with different numbers of chromosomes. Of the two F1 hybrids (first generation hybrids) between these two species, a mule is easier to obtain than a hinny, which is the offspring of a female donkey (jenny) and a male horse (stallion). The size of a mule and work to which it is put depend largely on the breeding of the mule's female parent (dam)
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Positive Reinforcement
In behavioral psychology, reinforcement is a consequence that will strengthen an organism's future behavior whenever that behavior is preceded by a specific antecedent stimulus. This strengthening effect may be measured as a higher frequency of behavior (e.g., pulling a lever more frequently), longer duration (e.g., pulling a lever for longer periods of time), greater magnitude (e.g., pulling a lever with greater force), or shorter latency (e.g., pulling a lever more quickly following the antecedent stimulus). Rewarding stimuli, which are associated with "wanting" and "liking" (desire and pleasure, respectively) and appetitive behavior, function as positive reinforcers;[1] the converse statement is also true: positive reinforcers provide a desirable stimulus.[1] Reinforcement does not require an individual to consciously perceive an effect elicited by the stimulus.[2] Thus, reinforcement occurs only if there is an observable strengthening in behavior
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Wyoming
Wyoming
Wyoming
/waɪˈoʊmɪŋ/ ( listen) is a state in the mountain region of the western United States. The state is the 10th largest by area, the least populous and the second least densely populated state in the country. Wyoming
Wyoming
is bordered on the north by Montana, on the east by South Dakota
South Dakota
and Nebraska, on the south by Colorado, on the southwest by Utah, and on the west by Idaho. The state population was estimated at 586,107 in 2015, which is less than 31 of the most populous U.S. cities including neighboring Denver.[8] Cheyenne is the state capital and the most populous city, with population estimated at 63,335 in 2015.[9] The western two-thirds of the state is covered mostly by the mountain ranges and rangelands of the Rocky Mountains, while the eastern third of the state is high elevation prairie called the High Plains
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Tenterfield, New South Wales
Tenterfield is a town in New South Wales, Australia. It is located in the New England region at the intersection of the New England Highway and the Bruxner Highway. Tenterfield is a three-hour drive from Brisbane, Queensland, three hours from Byron Bay, New South Wales, two hours from Armidale, New South Wales
New South Wales
and eight hours from Sydney. The town is on the north-western part of the Northern Tableland plateau, nestled in a valley, astride the Great Dividing Range
Great Dividing Range
and beneath the imposing Mount MacKenzie (1,287m elevation)
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Stockman (Australia)
Stockman may refer to: Stockman (Australia), a person who looks after livestock on a station Stockman (surname), a surname Rancher, an owner of a North American livestock ranch operation Cowman (profession), owner or operator of a cattle business Dairy farmer, owner or manager of a dairy farm Stock contractor, in the United States, contractor who supplies livestock, especially for rodeo Shepherd, a person who looks after sheep in the fieldsSee also[edit]Station (Australian agriculture)#Personnel Stockgrower (other) Stockmann (other) Shtokman field, named after Vladimir Shtokman (Stockmann) Stockman's Lash Australian Stockman's Hall of Fame The Phantom Stockman, a 1953 Australian film Dr. G.C
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Leather
Leather
Leather
is a durable and flexible material created by tanning animal rawhides, mostly cattle hide. It can be produced at manufacturing scales ranging from cottage industry to heavy industry. Leather
Leather
is used to make various goods, including clothing (especially footwear), in bookbinding, and as a furniture covering
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Steve Jefferys
Steve Jefferys (born in Australia) was the lone rider in the Sydney Olympics Opening Ceremony. He galloped into the stadium on his 7-year-old Australian Stock Horse
Australian Stock Horse
"Ammo", which reared, and then Jefferys cracked his whip to signal the beginning of the Opening Ceremony. This was followed by the entrance of a further 120 riders (which included Steve Jefferys' wife, Sandra Langsford) and their Stock Horses. Jefferys and "Ammo" re-created their Olympics entrance during the 2002 Australian stage production The Man from Snowy River: Arena Spectacular, which was based on Banjo Paterson's poem The Man from Snowy River. He also played the role of "The Breaker" in the show, and his wife also took part as one of the crack riders (expert riders). The Arena Spectacular was so successful that the show toured Australian capital cities twice
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Sled Dog
Sled dogs were important for transportation in arctic areas, hauling supplies in areas that were inaccessible by other methods. They were used with varying success in the explorations of both poles, as well as during the Alaskan gold rush. Sled dog
Sled dog
teams delivered mail to rural communities in Alaska
Alaska
and northern Canada. Sled dogs today are still used by some rural communities, especially in areas of Alaska and Canada
Canada
and throughout Greenland
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Australian Stock Horse
The Australian Stock Horse
Horse
(or Stockhorse), has been especially bred for Australian conditions. It is a hardy breed of horse noted for endurance, agility and a good temperament. Its ancestry dates to the arrival of the first horses in Australia, brought from Europe, Africa and Asia
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2000 Summer Olympics
The 2000 Summer Olympic Games, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad and commonly known as Sydney
Sydney
2000 or the Millennium Olympic Games/Games of the New Millennium, were an international multi-sport event which was held between 15 September and 1 October 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It was the second time that the Summer Olympics were held in Australia, and also the Southern Hemisphere, the first being in Melbourne, Victoria, in 1956. Sydney
Sydney
was selected as the host city for the 2000 Games in 1993. Teams from 199 countries participated. The United States
United States
won the most medals with 93, while Australia
Australia
came in 4th with 58. The Games cost was estimated to be A$6.6 billion. The Games received universal acclaim, with the organisation, volunteers, sportsmanship and Australian public being lauded in the international media
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Balatá
Mimusops bidentata A.DC. Mimusops globosa C.F.Gaertn. Mimusops balata Crueg. ex Griseb.List sources :[1][2][3][4] Manilkara
Manilkara
bidentata - MHNT Manilkara
Manilkara
bidentata is a species of Manilkara
Manilkara
native to a large area of northern South America, Central America
Central America
and the Caribbean. Common names include bulletwood,[5] balatá, ausubo, massaranduba, and (ambiguously) "cow-tree". Balatá is a large tree, growing to 30–45 m (98–148 ft) tall. The leaves are alternate, elliptical, entire, and 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) long. The flowers are white, and are produced at the beginning of the rainy season. The fruit is a yellow berry, 3–5 cm (1.2–2.0 in) in diameter, which is edible; it contains one (occasionally two) seed(s)
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Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's third largest in physical size and holds an art collection with roughly 1.5 million works.[2] Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and founded in 1895, the Beaux-Arts building, designed by McKim, Mead and White, was planned to be the largest art museum in the world. The museum initially struggled to maintain its building and collection, only to be revitalized in the late 20th century, thanks to major renovations. Significant areas of the collection include antiquities, specifically their collection of Egyptian antiquities
Egyptian antiquities
spanning over 3,000 years
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