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West
WEST is one of the four cardinal directions or points of the compass . It is the opposite direction from east . CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Navigation
Navigation
* 3 Cultural * 4 Symbolic meanings * 5 References * 6 External links ETYMOLOGYThe word "West" is a Germanic word passed into some Romance languages (ouest in French, oest in Catalan, ovest in Italian, oeste in Spanish and Portuguese). As is apparent in the Gothic term vasi ( Visigoths
Visigoths
), it stems from the same Indo-European root that gave the Sanskrit vas-ati (night) and vesper (evening) in Latin. NAVIGATIONTo go west using a compass for navigation , one needs to set a bearing or azimuth of 270°. West
West
is the direction opposite that of the Earth
Earth
's rotation on its axis, and is therefore the general direction towards which the Sun appears to constantly progress and eventually set
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Bearing (navigation)
In navigation BEARING may refer, depending on the context, to any of: (A) the direction or course of motion itself; (B) the direction of a distant object relative to the current course (or the "change" in course that would be needed to get to that distant object); or (C), the angle away from North of a distant point as observed at the current point. Absolute bearing refers to the angle between the magnetic North (magnetic bearing) or true North (true bearing) and an object. For example, an object to the East would have an absolute bearing of 90 degrees. Relative bearing refers to the angle between the craft's forward direction, and the location of another object. For example, an object relative bearing of 0 degrees would be dead ahead; an object relative bearing 180 degrees would be behind. Bearings can be measured in mils or degrees
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Navigation
NAVIGATION is a field of study that focuses on the process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another. The field of navigation includes four general categories: land navigation, marine navigation, aeronautic navigation, and space navigation. It is also the term of art used for the specialized knowledge used by navigators to perform navigation tasks. All navigational techniques involve locating the navigator's position compared to known locations or patterns. Navigation, in a broader sense, can refer to any skill or study that involves the determination of position and direction. In this sense, navigation includes orienteering and pedestrian navigation. For information about different navigation strategies that people use, visit human navigation
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Underworld
The UNDERWORLD or NETHERWORLD is an otherworld thought to be deep underground or beneath the surface of the world in most religions and mythologies . Typically, it is a place where the souls of the departed go, an afterlife or a REALM OF THE DEAD. Chthonic
Chthonic
is the technical adjective for things of the underworld. CONTENTS * 1 Underworlds by mythology * 2 Underworld
Underworld
figures * 3 See also * 4 References UNDERWORLDS BY MYTHOLOGYThis list includes underworlds in various mythology, with links to corresponding articles
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Shekinah
The SHEKHINA(H) (also spelled SHEKINA(H), SCHECHINA(H), or SHECHINA(H)) (Biblical Hebrew : שכינה‎‎) is the English transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning "dwelling" or "settling" and denotes the dwelling or settling of the divine presence of God . The Shekhinah is the feminine aspect of Divinity, also referred to as the Divine Presence. :231 This term does not occur in the Bible, and is from rabbinic literature
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Otherworld
The concept of an OTHERWORLD in historical Indo-European religion is reconstructed in comparative mythology . Its name is a calque of orbis alius ( Latin for "other Earth/world"), a term used by Lucan
Lucan
in his description of the Celtic Otherworld . Comparable religious , mythological or metaphysical concepts, such as a realm of supernatural beings and a realm of the dead , are found in cultures throughout the world
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Amunet
AMUNET (/ˈæməˌnɛt/ ; also spelled Amonet or Amaunet) was a primordial goddess in ancient Egyptian religion . She is a member of the Ogdoad and the consort of Amun
Amun
. Her name, meaning "the female hidden one", was simply the feminine form of Amun's own name. It is possible that she was never an independent deity, as the first mention of either of them is in a pair. By at least the Twelfth dynasty (c. 1991–1803 BC) she was overshadowed as Amun's consort by Mut
Mut
, but she remained locally important in the region of Thebes where Amun
Amun
was worshipped, and there she was seen as a protector of the pharaoh . At Karnak
Karnak
, Amun's cult center, priests were dedicated to Amunet's service. The goddess also played a part in royal ceremonies such as the Sed festival
Sed festival

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Promised Land
The PROMISED LAND (Hebrew : הארץ המובטחת‎‎, translit. : Ha'Aretz HaMuvtahat; Arabic : أرض الميعاد‎‎, translit. : Ard Al-Mi'ad; also known as "The Land of Milk and Honey") is the land which, according to the Tanakh
Tanakh
(the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
), was promised and subsequently given by God to Abraham
Abraham
and his descendants, and in modern contexts an image and idea related both to the restored Homeland for the Jewish people and to salvation and liberation is more generally understood. The promise was first made to Abraham
Abraham
(Genesis 15:18-21), then confirmed to his son Isaac
Isaac
(Genesis 26:3), and then to Isaac's son Jacob
Jacob
(Genesis 28:13), Abraham's grandson
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Liberty
LIBERTY, in philosophy, involves free will as contrasted with determinism . In politics, liberty consists of the social and political freedoms to which all community members are entitled. In theology , liberty is freedom from the effects of, "sin, spiritual servitude, worldly ties." Generally, liberty is distinctly differentiated from freedom in that freedom is primarily, if not exclusively, the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty concerns the absence of arbitrary restraints and takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, the exercise of liberty is subject to capability and limited by the rights of others
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Azimuth
An AZIMUTH (/ˈæzɪməθ/ ( listen )) (from the pl. form of the Arabic noun "السَّمْت" as-samt, meaning "the direction") is an angular measurement in a spherical coordinate system . The vector from an observer (origin ) to a point of interest is projected perpendicularly onto a reference plane ; the angle between the projected vector and a reference vector on the reference plane is called the azimuth. An example is the position of a star in the sky. The star is the point of interest, the reference plane is the horizon or the surface of the sea , and the reference vector points north . The azimuth is the angle between the north vector and the perpendicular projection of the star down onto the horizon. Azimuth
Azimuth
is usually measured in degrees (°). The concept is used in navigation , astronomy , engineering , mapping , mining and artillery
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Sun
The SUN is the star at the center of the Solar System
Solar System
. It is a nearly perfect sphere of hot plasma , with internal convective motion that generates a magnetic field via a dynamo process . It is by far the most important source of energy for life on Earth
Earth
. Its diameter is about 109 times that of Earth, and its mass is about 330,000 times that of Earth, accounting for about 99.86% of the total mass of the Solar System. About three quarters of the Sun's mass consists of hydrogen (~73%); the rest is mostly helium (~25%), with much smaller quantities of heavier elements, including oxygen , carbon , neon , and iron . The Sun
Sun
is a G-type main-sequence star
G-type main-sequence star
(G2V) based on its spectral class . As such, it is informally referred to as a yellow dwarf
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Mecca
MECCA (/ˈmɛkə/ ) or MAKKAH ( Arabic
Arabic
: مكة‎‎ Makkah ) is a city in the Hejaz
Hejaz
region of Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
that is also capital of the Makkah Region . The city is located 70 km (43 mi) inland from Jeddah in a narrow valley at a height of 277 m (909 ft) above sea level, and 340 kilometres (210 mi) south of Medina
Medina
. Its resident population in 2012 was roughly 2 million, although visitors more than triple this number every year during the hajj ("pilgrimage") period held in the twelfth Muslim
Muslim
lunar month of Dhu al-Hijjah
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Aztec
AZTEC CULTURE (/ˈæztɛk/ ), also known as Mexica
Mexica
culture, was a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in Central Mexico
Mexico
in the post-classic period from 1300-1521, during the time in which a triple alliance of the Mexica, Texcoca and Tepaneca tribes established the Aztec empire . The Aztec
Aztec
people were certain ethnic groups of central Mexico
Mexico
, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica from the 14th to 16th centuries. Aztec
Aztec
culture is the culture of the people referred to as Aztecs, but since most ethnic groups of central Mexico
Mexico
in the postclassic period shared basic cultural traits, many of the traits that characterize Aztec
Aztec
culture cannot be said to be exclusive to the Aztecs
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Death
DEATH is the cessation of all biological functions that sustain a living organism . Phenomena which commonly bring about death include senescence , predation , malnutrition , disease , suicide , homicide , starvation , dehydration , and accidents or trauma resulting in terminal injury . In most cases, bodies of living organisms begin to decompose shortly after death. Death
Death
– particularly the death of humans – has commonly been considered a sad or unpleasant occasion, due to the affection for the being that has died and the termination of social and familial bonds with the deceased. Other concerns include fear of death , necrophobia , anxiety , sorrow , grief , emotional pain , depression , sympathy , compassion , solitude , or saudade . Many cultures and religions have the idea of an afterlife , and also hold the idea of reward or judgement and punishment for past sin
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East
EAST is one of the four cardinal directions or points of the compass . It is the opposite direction from west . CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Navigation
Navigation
* 3 Cultural * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links ETYMOLOGYThe word east comes from Middle English
Middle English
est, from Old English
Old English
ēast, which itself comes from the Proto-Germanic *aus-to- or *austra- "east, toward the sunrise", from Proto-Indo-European *aus- "to shine," or "dawn". This is similar to Old High German
Old High German
*ōstar "to the east", Latin
Latin
aurora "dawn", and Greek ēōs or heōs. Ēostre
Ēostre
, a Germanic goddess of dawn, might have been a personification of both dawn and the cardinal points. NAVIGATIONBy convention , the right hand side of a map is east
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Maize
MAIZE (/ˈmeɪz/ MAYZ ; Zea mays subsp. mays, from Spanish : maíz after Taíno mahiz), also known as CORN, is a large grain plant first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico
Mexico
about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears , which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice . However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol , animal feed and other maize products , such as corn starch and corn syrup . The six major types of corn are dent corn , flint corn , pod corn , popcorn , flour corn , and sweet corn