HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Werowocomoco
Werowocomoco
Werowocomoco
was a village that served as the headquarters of the Powhatan, a Virginia Algonquian political and spiritual leader when the English founded Jamestown in 1607. The name Werowocomoco
Werowocomoco
comes from the Powhatan werowans (weroance), meaning "leader" in English; and komakah (-comoco), "settlement". The town was documented by English settlers in 1608 as located near the north bank of the York River in what is now Gloucester County. It was separated by that river and the narrow Virginia Peninsula
Virginia Peninsula
from the English settlement of Jamestown, located on the James River. Powhatan's Chimney
Powhatan's Chimney
at Wicomico, a site of historical ruins associated with a house purported to have been built for Powhatan, was long thought to have been the site of this capital
[...More...]

"Werowocomoco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
[...More...]

"National Register Of Historic Places" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

College Of William And Mary
The College of William & Mary in Virginia
Virginia
(also known as William & Mary, or W&M) is a public research university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. Royally founded in 1693 by letters patent issued by King William III and Queen Mary II, it is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, after Harvard
Harvard
University. William and Mary is the oldest college in the Commonwealth of Virginia
Virginia
and the oldest institution of higher education in the American South
[...More...]

"College Of William And Mary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Timberneck
Timberneck is a historic home located near Wicomico, Gloucester County, Virginia. It was built about 1810, and is a two-story, three bay, gable roofed frame dwelling in the Georgian style. The main house was enlarged by the addition of a frame wing in the mid-19th century.[3] It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.[1] References[edit]^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.  ^ Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission (August 1970). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Timberneck" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources.  and Accompanying photov t eU.S
[...More...]

"Timberneck" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Virginia Commonwealth University
Virginia
Virginia
Commonwealth University (VCU) is a public research university located in Richmond, Virginia. MCV was founded in 1838 as the medical department of Hampden–Sydney College, becoming the Medical College of Virginia
Virginia
in 1854
[...More...]

"Virginia Commonwealth University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Woodland Period
In the classification of Archaeological cultures of North America, the Woodland period
Woodland period
of North American pre-Columbian cultures spanned a period from roughly 1000 BCE to European contact in the eastern part of North America, with some archaeologists distinguishing the Mississippian period, from 1000 CE to European contact as a separate period.[1] The term "Woodland Period" was introduced in the 1930s as a generic term for prehistoric sites falling between the Archaic hunter-gatherers and the agriculturalist Mississippian cultures
[...More...]

"Woodland Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Archaeological Survey
In archaeology, survey or field survey is a type of field research by which archaeologists (often landscape archaeologists) search for archaeological sites and collect information about the location, distribution and organization of past human cultures across a large area (e.g. typically in excess of one hectare, and often in excess of many km2). Archaeologists conduct surveys to search for particular archaeological sites or kinds of sites, to detect patterns in the distribution of material culture over regions, to make generalizations or test hypotheses about past cultures, and to assess the risks that development projects will have adverse impacts on archaeological heritage.[1] The surveys may be: (a) intrusive or non-intrusive, depending on the needs of the survey team (and the risk of destroying archaeological evidence if intrusive methods are used) and; (b) extensive or intensive, depending on the types of research questions being asked of the landscape in question
[...More...]

"Archaeological Survey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Trade
Trade
Trade
involves the transfer of goods or services from one person or entity to another, often in exchange for money. A system or network that allows trade is called a market. The original form of trade, barter, saw the direct exchange of goods and services for other goods and services.[1][need quotation to verify] Barter
Barter
involves trading things without the use of money.[1] Later one bartering party started to involve precious metals, which gained symbolic as well as practical importance. Modern traders generally negotiate through a medium of exchange, such as money. As a result, buying can be separated from selling, or earning. The invention of money (and later credit, paper money and of non-physical money) greatly simplified and promoted trade
[...More...]

"Trade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Virginia Indian
The Native American tribes in Virginia
Virginia
are the indigenous tribes who currently live or have historically lived in what is now the Commonwealth of Virginia
Commonwealth of Virginia
in the United States of America. All of the Commonwealth of Virginia
Commonwealth of Virginia
used to be Virginia
Virginia
Indian territory. Indigenous peoples
Indigenous peoples
have occupied the region for at least 12,000 years.[1] Their population has been estimated to have been about 50,000 at the time of European colonization.[citation needed] At contact, Virginian tribes spoke languages belonging to three major language families: roughly, Algonquian along the coast, Iroquoian
Iroquoian
in the southern Tidewater region, and Siouan
Siouan
above the Fall Line
[...More...]

"Virginia Indian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Earthworks (archaeology)
In archaeology, earthworks are artificial changes in land level, typically made from piles of artificially placed or sculpted rocks and soil
[...More...]

"Earthworks (archaeology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Barack Obama
Pre-presidency Illinois
Illinois
State Senator 2004 DNC keynote address U.S
[...More...]

"Barack Obama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

National Park System
The National Park Service
National Park Service
(NPS) is an agency of the United States federal government that manages all national parks, many national monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations.[1] It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service
National Park Service
Organic Act[2] and is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior
[...More...]

"National Park System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Copper
Copper
Copper
is a chemical element with symbol Cu (from Latin: cuprum) and atomic number 29. It is a soft, malleable, and ductile metal with very high thermal and electrical conductivity. A freshly exposed surface of pure copper has a reddish-orange color. Copper
Copper
is used as a conductor of heat and electricity, as a building material, and as a constituent of various metal alloys, such as sterling silver used in jewelry, cupronickel used to make marine hardware and coins, and constantan used in strain gauges and thermocouples for temperature measurement. Copper
Copper
is one of the few metals that occur in nature in directly usable metallic form (native metals) as opposed to needing extraction from an ore. This led to very early human use, from c. 8000 BC. It was the first metal to be smelted from its ore, c. 5000 BC, the first metal to be cast into a shape in a mold, c
[...More...]

"Copper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

West Point, Virginia
West Point (formerly Delaware) is an incorporated town in King William County, Virginia, United States
[...More...]

"West Point, Virginia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Mattaponi
Enrolled members: Mattaponi, King William County, Virginia: 450 Upper Mattaponi, Hanover County, Virginia: 575Regions with significant populations United States VirginiaLanguagesEnglish, Virginia Algonquian (historical)ReligionChristianity (incl. syncretistic forms)Related ethnic groupsPamunkeyThe Mattaponi (English: /ˌmætəpoʊˈnaɪ/[1]) tribe is one of only two Virginia Indian[2] tribes in the Commonwealth of Virginia that owns reservation land, which it has held since the colonial era. The larger Mattaponi Indian Tribe lives in King William County on the reservation, which stretches along the borders of the Mattaponi River, near West Point, Virginia.[3][4] The Mattaponi were one of six tribes inherited by Chief Powhatan in the late 16th century.[5] The tribe spoke an Algonquian language, like other members of the Powhatan Chiefdom
[...More...]

"Mattaponi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pamunkey
The Pamunkey
Pamunkey
Indian Tribe is one of 11 Virginia
Virginia
Indian[1] tribes recognized by the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the state's first federally recognized tribe,[2][3] receiving its status in January 2016.[4] Six other Virginia
Virginia
tribes, the Chickahominy, the Eastern Chickahominy, the Upper Mattaponi, the Rappahannock, the Monacan, and the Nansemond, were similarly recognized through the passage of the Thomasina E. Jordan Indian Tribes of Virginia
Virginia
Federal Recognition Act of 2017 on January 12, 2018.[5] The historical tribe was part of the Powhatan
Powhatan
paramountcy, made up of Algonquian-speaking tribes
[...More...]

"Pamunkey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.