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Weir
A weir /wɪər/ or low head dam is a barrier across the horizontal width of a river that alters the flow characteristics of the water and usually results in a change in the height of the river level
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Sturminster Newton
Sturminster Newton
Sturminster Newton
/ˌstɜːrmɪnstər ˈnjuːtən/ is a town and civil parish in the Blackmore Vale
Blackmore Vale
area of Dorset, England. It is situated on a low limestone ridge in a meander of the River Stour. The town is at the centre of a large dairy agriculture region, around which the town's economy is built. The larger part of the town (Sturminster) lies on the north side of the river, and includes most shops and services, whilst to the south is the smaller Newton. Between these two areas is a wide flood plain. The town was the home of poet and author William Barnes, and, for part of his life, Thomas Hardy. The town has 43 shops, a primary and secondary school, and a school and college catering for children with special educational needs. In the 2011 census the town's civil parish had a population of 4,292. A market is held in the town on Mondays
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Sea Lamprey
The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is a parasitic lamprey native to the Northern Hemisphere.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Ecology 4 Physiology 5 Genetics 6 Invasive species6.1 Efforts at control6.1.1 Restoration7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit] For a broader coverage related to general lamprey morphology, see Lamprey. The sea lamprey has an eel-like body without paired fins. Its mouth is jawless, round and sucker-like, and as wide or wider than the head; sharp teeth are arranged in many consecutive circular rows. There are 7 branchial openings behind the eye. They are olive or brown-yellow on the dorsal and lateral part of the body, with some black marblings, with lighter coloration on the belly
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Ohio DNR
The Ohio
Ohio
Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is the administrative department of the Ohio
Ohio
state government[1] charged with maintaining natural resources such as state parks, state nature preserves, state wildlife areas, state forests, and state waterways
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
(/ˈhɑːrtfərdʃɪər/ ( listen)[n 1]; often abbreviated Herts) is a county in southern England, bordered by Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north, Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the north-east, Essex
Essex
to the east, Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
to the west and Greater London
Greater London
to the south. For government statistical purposes, it is placed in the East of England
England
region. In 2013, the county had a population of 1,140,700[2] living in an area of 634 square miles (1,640 km2).[3] Four towns have between 50,000 and 100,000 residents: Hemel Hempstead, Stevenage, Watford
Watford
and St Albans
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Warkworth, New Zealand
Warkworth is a town on the Northland Peninsula
Northland Peninsula
in the upper North Island of New Zealand. It is in the northern part of the Auckland Region
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Meuse (river)
The Meuse
Meuse
(/mjuːz/; French: la Meuse
Meuse
[møz]; Walloon: Moûze [muːs]) or Maas (Dutch: Maas [ˈmaːs]; Limburgish: Maos or Maas) is a major European river, rising in France
France
and flowing through Belgium
Belgium
and the Netherlands
Netherlands
before draining into the North Sea
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County Durham
County Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜːrəm/) is a county[N 1] in North East England.[2] The county town is Durham, a cathedral city. The largest settlement is Darlington, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south.[3] The county's historic boundaries stretch between the rivers Tyne and Tees, and so includes places such as Gateshead, Jarrow, South Shields and Sunderland. During the Middle Ages the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert being in Durham Cathedral, and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham. The county has a mixture of mining and farming heritage, as well as a heavy railway industry, particularly in the southeast of the county in Darlington, Shildon and Stockton
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Dorset
Dorset
Dorset
(/ˈdɔːrsɪt/; archaically, Dorsetshire) is a county in South West England
England
on the English Channel
English Channel
coast. The ceremonial county comprises the non-metropolitan county, which is governed by Dorset County Council, and the unitary authority areas of Poole
Poole
and Bournemouth. Covering an area of 2,653 square kilometres (1,024 sq mi), Dorset
Dorset
borders Devon
Devon
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the north-west, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the north-east, and Hampshire
Hampshire
to the east. The county town is Dorchester which is in the south. After the reorganisation of local government in 1974 the county's border was extended eastward to incorporate the Hampshire
Hampshire
towns of Bournemouth and Christchurch
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Raymore Park
Coordinates: 43°41′47.94″N 79°30′54.24″W / 43.6966500°N 79.5150667°W / 43.6966500; -79.5150667 Raymore Drive is a mostly residential street in the Weston neighbourhood of Toronto in the Canadian province of Ontario. It runs next to the Humber River. On October 15, 1954, the area was severely affected by Hurricane Hazel. When the Humber River burst its banks and tore away a footbridge, the waters of the Humber were redirected through the neighbourhood. The flood killed 35 residents and washed away 39 percent of the street. Altogether, Hazel was responsible for 81 deaths in Canada. Subsequent residential development in that area was prohibited
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Silt
Silt
Silt
is granular material of a size between sand and clay, whose mineral origin is quartz[1] and feldspar. Silt
Silt
may occur as a soil (often mixed with sand or clay) or as sediment mixed in suspension with water (also known as a suspended load) and soil in a body of water such as a river. It may also exist as soil deposited at the bottom of a water body, like mudflows from landslides. Silt
Silt
has a moderate specific area with a typically non-sticky, plastic feel. Silt usually has a floury feel when dry, and a slippery feel when wet. Silt can be visually observed with a hand lens, exhibiting a sparkly appearance
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Siltation
Siltation
Siltation
or siltification is the pollution of water by particulate terrestrial clastic material, with a particle size dominated by silt or clay. It refers both to the increased concentration of suspended sediments, and to the increased accumulation (temporary or permanent) of fine sediments on bottoms where they are undesirable. Siltation
Siltation
is most often caused by soil erosion or sediment spill. Sometimes siltation is called sediment pollution, although that is an undesirable term since it is ambiguous, and can also be used to refer to a chemical contamination of sediments accumulated on the bottom, or pollutants bound to sediment particles
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