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Webster's Dictionary
Webster's Dictionary
Dictionary
is any of the dictionaries edited by Noah Webster in the early nineteenth century, and numerous unrelated dictionaries that have adopted the Webster's name. "Webster's" has become a genericized trademark in the U.S
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Webster–Hayne Debate
The Webster–Hayne debate was a famous debate in the United States between Senator Daniel Webster of Massachusetts and Senator Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina that took place on January 19–27, 1830 on the topic of protectionist tariffs. The heated speeches between Webster and Hayne themselves were unplanned, and stemmed from debate over a resolution by Connecticut Senator Samuel A. Foot calling for the temporary suspension of further land surveying until land already on the market was sold (this would effectively stop the introduction of new lands onto the market). Webster's "Second Reply to Hayne" was generally regarded as "the most eloquent speech ever delivered in Congress."[1] Webster's description of the U.S
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Yale College
Yale College is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Yale University. Founded in 1701, it is the original school of the university. Although other schools of the university were founded as early as 1810, all of Yale was officially known as Yale College until 1887, when its schools were confederated and the institution was renamed Yale University. Originally established to train Congregationalist ministers, the college began teaching humanities and natural sciences by the late 18th century. At the same time, students began organizing extracurricular organizations, first literary societies, and later publications, sports teams, and singing groups. By the mid-19th century, it was the largest college in the United States. In 1847, it was joined by another undergraduate degree-granting school at Yale, the Sheffield Scientific School, which was absorbed into the college in the mid-20th century
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John Ogilvie (lexicographer)
John Ogilvie (17 April 1797 – 21 November 1867) was a Scottish lexicographer who edited the Imperial Dictionary of the English Language.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 NotesLife[edit] He was born 17 April 1797 in Marnoch, Banffshire (now in Aberdeenshire), the son of William Ogilvie, farmer, and Ann Leslie, daughter of a farmer in a neighbouring parish.[1] After receiving some elementary education at home, and attending the parish school for two quarters, Ogilvie worked as a ploughman till he was twenty-one. In 1818, after an accident, one of his legs had to be amputated above the knee. Afterwards Ogilvie taught successively in two subscription schools, in the parishes of Fordyce and Gamrie, both in Banffshire. With the help of a local schoolmaster, he prepared for university, and in October 1824 he entered Marischal College, Aberdeen
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The Chicago Manual Of Style
The Chicago
Chicago
Manual of Style (abbreviated in writing as CMOS [the acronym used on its website] or CMS, or sometimes as Chicago) is a style guide for American English
American English
published since 1906 by the University of Chicago
Chicago
Press. Its seventeen editions have prescribed writing and citation styles widely used in publishing. It is "one of the most widely used and respected style guides in the United States".[attribution needed][1] CMOS deals with aspects of editorial practice, from American English
American English
grammar and use to document preparation
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CD-ROM
A CD-ROM
CD-ROM
/ˌsiːˌdiːˈrɒm/ is a pre-pressed optical compact disc which contains data. The name is an acronym which stands for "Compact Disc Read-Only Memory". Computers can read CD-ROMs, but cannot write to CD-ROMs, which are not writable or erasable. During the 1990s, CD-ROMs were popularly used to distribute software for computers and video game consoles. Some CDs, called enhanced CDs, hold both computer data and audio with the latter capable of being played on a CD player, while data (such as software or digital video) is only usable on a computer (such as ISO 9660[2] format PC CD-ROMs). The CD-ROM
CD-ROM
format was developed by Japanese company Denon
Denon
in 1982
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Knights Of The Round Table
The Round Table
Round Table
is King Arthur's famed table in the Arthurian legend, around which he and his Knights congregate. As its name suggests, it has no head, implying that everyone who sits there has equal status. The table was first described in 1155 by Wace, who relied on previous depictions of Arthur's fabulous retinue. The symbolism of the Round Table developed over time; by the close of the 12th century it had come to represent the chivalric order associated with Arthur's court, the Knights of the Round Table.Contents1 History 2 Later development 3 Round Table
Round Table
tournaments3.1 Winchester Round Table4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Round Table
Round Table
first appeared in Wace's Roman de Brut, a Norman language adaptation of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae finished in 1155
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Subscription Business Model
The subscription business model is a business model where a customer must pay a subscription price to have access to a product or service. The model was pioneered by magazines and newspapers, but is now used by many businesses and websites.Contents1 Subscriptions1.1 Types2 Effects2.1 Vendors 2.2 Customers2.2.1 Legal2.3 Environment3 See also 4 ReferencesSubscriptions[edit] Rather than selling products individually, a subscription sells periodic (monthly or yearly or seasonal) use or access to a product or service, or, in the case of such non-profit organizations as opera companies or symphony orchestras, it sells tickets to the entire run of some set number of (eg., five to fifteen) scheduled performances for an entire season. Thus, a one-time sale of a product can become a recurring sale and can build brand loyalty
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Website
A website[1] is a collection of related web pages, including multimedia content, typically identified with a common domain name, and published on at least one web server. A website may be accessible via a public Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) network, such as the Internet, or a private local area network (LAN), by referencing a uniform resource locator (URL) that identifies the site. Websites can have many functions and can be used in various fashions; a website can be a personal website, a corporate website for a company, a government website, an organization website, etc
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Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
is a Scottish-founded, now American company best known for publishing the Encyclopædia Britannica, the world's oldest continuously published encyclopedia.Contents1 History1.1 Sears
Sears
Roebuck 1.2 William Benton 1.3 Jacqui Safra2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit]Current location in ChicagoThe company was founded in Edinburgh, Scotland, in the 18th century, in the atmosphere of the Scottish Enlightenment
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Microsoft
Microsoft
Microsoft
Corporation (/ˈmaɪkrəˌsɒft/,[2][3] abbreviated as MS) is an American multinational technology company with headquarters in Redmond, Washington. It develops, manufactures, licenses, supports and sells computer software, consumer electronics, personal computers, and services. Its best known software products are the Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows line of operating systems, the Microsoft Office
Microsoft Office
suite, and the Internet
Internet
Explorer and Edge web browsers. Its flagship hardware products are the Xbox
Xbox
video game consoles and the Microsoft
Microsoft
Surface lineup of touchscreen personal computers
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Chronology
Chronology
Chronology
(from Latin
Latin
chronologia, from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
χρόνος, chrónos, "time"; and -λογία, -logia)[2] is the science of arranging events in their order of occurrence in time. Consider, for example, the use of a timeline or sequence of events. It is also "the determination of the actual temporal sequence of past events".[3] Chronology
Chronology
is part of periodization
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William Allan Neilson
William Allan Neilson (28 March 1869 – 1946) was a Scottish-American educator, writer and lexicographer, graduated in the University of Edinburgh in 1891 and became a Ph.D. in Harvard University in 1898. He was president of Smith College between 1917 and 1939. Neilson was born in Doune, Scotland and he emigrated to the United States in 1895, being naturalised 3 August 1905. He taught at Bryn Mawr College from 1898 to 1900, Harvard from 1900 to 1904, Columbia from 1904 to 1906, and Harvard again from 1906 to 1917
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Optical Character Recognition
Optical character recognition (also optical character reader, OCR) is the mechanical or electronic conversion of images of typed, handwritten or printed text into machine-encoded text, whether from a scanned document, a photo of a document, a scene-photo (for example the text on signs and billboards in a landscape photo) or from subtitle text superimposed on an image (for example from a television broadcast).[1] It is widely used as a form of information entry from printed paper data records, whether passport documents, invoices, bank statements, computerised receipts, business cards, mail, printouts of static-data, or any suitable documentation. It is a common method of digitising printed texts so that they can be electronically edited, searched, stored more compactly, displayed on-line, and used in machine processes such as cognitive computing, machine translation, (extracted) text-to-speech, key data and text mining
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Yale University
Yale University
Yale University
is an American private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States
United States
and one of the nine Colonial Colleges
Colonial Colleges
chartered before the American Revolution.[6] Chartered by Connecticut
Connecticut
Colony, the "Collegiate School" was established by clergy in Saybrook Colony
Saybrook Colony
to educate Congregational ministers. It moved to New Haven
New Haven
in 1716 and shortly after was renamed Yale College
Yale College
in recognition of a gift from British East India Company governor Elihu Yale
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Copyright
Copyright
Copyright
is a legal right created by the law of a country that grants the creator of an original work exclusive rights for its use and distribution. This is usually only for a limited time. The exclusive rights are not absolute but limited by limitations and exceptions to copyright law, including fair use. A major limitation on copyright is that copyright protects only the original expression of ideas, and not the underlying ideas themselves.[1][2] Copyright
Copyright
is a form of intellectual property, applicable to certain forms of creative work. Some, but not all jurisdictions require "fixing" copyrighted works in a tangible form
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