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Webley Revolver
The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Top-Break Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various marks, a standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, and the British Empire and Commonwealth, from 1887 until 1970. The Webley is a top-break revolver and breaking the revolver operates the extractor, which removes cartridges from the cylinder. The Webley Mk I service revolver was adopted in 1887 and the Mk IV rose to prominence during the Boer War of 1899–1902
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Muzzle Velocity

Muzzle velocity is the speed of a projectile (bullet, pellet, slug, ball/shots or shell) with respect to[1] the muzzle at the moment it leaves the end of a gun's barrel (i.e. the muzzle).[2] Firearm muzzle velocities range from approximately 120 m/s (390 ft/s) to 370 m/s (1,200 ft/s) in black powder muskets,[3] to more than 1,200 m/s (3,900 ft/s)[4] in modern rifles with high-velocity cartridges such as the .220 Swift and .204 Ruger, all the way to 1,700 m/s (5,600 ft/s)[5] for tank guns firing kinetic energy penetrator ammunition
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Mark (designation)
The word mark, followed by number, is a method of designating a version of a product. The kind of products that use this convention vary widely in complexity. The concept shares some similarities with the "type designation" (in hardware), the 1.0+ (1.1, 1.12, 2.0, 3.0, etc.) software versioning convention often used to designate general software product releases, and other version control schemas. It is often abbreviated as Mk or M. Because a mark is often made to measure height or progress, by metonymy the word mark is used to note a defined level of development; thus designations like "Mark I", "Mark II", "Mark III", "Mark IV", etc. come to be used as proper names. However, since the same name is used for a wide variety of products, it can have varied connotations for different persons. Mark refers to a mark on the modification plate of a system, component or machine
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Break-action
Break action is a type of firearm action in which the barrel or barrels are hinged much like a door and rotate perpendicularly to the bore axis to expose the breech and allow loading and unloading of cartridges. A separate operation may be required for the cocking of a hammer to fire the new round. There are many types of break-action firearms; break actions are universal in double-barrelled shotguns, double rifles and combination guns, and are also common in single shot rifles, pistols (especially derringers), and shotguns, and can also be found in flare guns, grenade launchers, air guns and some older revolver designs. They are also known as hinge-action, break-open, break-barrel, break-top, or, on old revolvers, top-break actions. The tip-up was the first revolver design for use with metallic cartridges in the Smith & Wesson Model 1, on which the barrel pivoted upwards, hinged on the forward end of the top strap
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Extractor (firearms)
In firearms, an extractor is a part in a breechloading weapon that serves to remove casings of previously fired cartridges from the chamber, so new rounds of ammunition can be loaded for firing. In repeating firearms with moving bolts, the extractor is often aided by an ejector, which expels the casings entirely out of the gun. Extractors can be found on bolt-action, lever-action, pump-action, semi-automatic and fully automatic firearms. Break-action shotguns and double rifles, such as those with single or double barrels, typically have an extractor that operates when the action is broken open. Extractors are also found on revolvers, removing cases either in succession (as in a fixed-cylinder single-action revolver) or simultaneously (as in a double-action revolver with a swing-out or top-break cylinder). For rimless cases, an extractor groove in the ammunition may serve as the point from which the extractor works
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Moon Clip
A moon clip is a ring-shaped or star-shaped piece of metal designed to hold multiple cartridges together as a unit, for simultaneous insertion and extraction from a revolver cylinder. Moon clips may either hold an entire cylinder's worth of cartridges together (full moon clip), half a cylinder (half-moon clip), or just two neighboring cartridges. The two-cartridge moon clips can be used for those revolvers that have an odd number of loading chambers such as five or seven and also for those revolvers that allow a shooter to mix both rimless and rimmed types of cartridges in one loading of the same cylinder (e.g., 2 adjacent rounds of .45 ACP, 2 rounds of .45 Colt, and 2 rounds of .410 in a single six-chamber S&W Governor cylinder). Moon clips can be used either to chamber rimless cartridges in a double-action revolver (which would normally require rimmed cartridges), or to chamber multiple rimmed cartridges simultaneously
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Caliber

In guns, particularly firearms, caliber (or calibre in British English) is the specified nominal internal diameter of the gun barrel bore regardless of how or where the bore is measured and whether or not the finished bore matches that specification.[1] It is measured in inches or in millimeters.[2] For example, a ".45 caliber" firearm has a barrel diameter of roughly 0.45 inches (11 mm). Barrel diameters can also be expressed using metric dimensions. For example, a "9 mm pistol" has a barrel diameter of about 9 millimeters
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