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Water Polo
Water polo
Water polo
is a competitive team sport played in the water between two teams. The game consists of four quarters, usually of eight minutes, in which the two teams attempt to score goals and throw the ball into their opponent's goal. The team with the most goals at the end of the game wins the match. Each team is made up of six field players and one goalkeeper. Except for the goalkeeper, players participate in both offensive and defensive roles. the goal keeper is allowed to use 2 hands at all times. Water polo
Water polo
is typically played in an all-deep pool seven feet (or two meters) deep. Special
Special
equipment for water polo includes a water polo ball, which floats on the water; numbered and coloured caps; and two goals, which either float in the water or are attached to the side of the pool. The game is thought to have originated in Scotland in the late 19th century as a sort of "water rugby"
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Physical Exercise
Physical exercise
Physical exercise
is any bodily activity that enhances or maintains physical fitness and overall health and wellness.[1] It is performed for various reasons, including increasing growth and development, preventing aging, strengthening muscles and the cardiovascular system, honing athletic skills, weight loss or maintenance, and also enjoyment. Frequent and regular physical exercise boosts the immune system and helps prevent certain "diseases of affluence" such as coronary heart disease,[2] type 2 diabetes,[3] and obesity
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Man-to-man Defence
Man-to-man defense is a type of defensive tactic used in team sports such as American football, association football, basketball, and netball, in which each player is assigned to defend and follow the movements of a single player on offense. Often, a player guards his counterpart (e.g. center guarding center), but a player may be assigned to guard a different position. However, the strategy is not rigid, and a player might switch assignment if needed, or leave his own assignment for a moment to double team an offensive player. The term is commonly used in both men's and women's sports,[1] though the gender-neutral 'player-to-player' also has some usage.[2] The alternative to man-to-man defense is zone defense, in which the defender is assigned a specific area of the floor, and then guards whatever offensive player enters his area. The advantage of the man-to-man defense is that it is more aggressive than the zone defense
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National Federation Of State High School Associations
The National Federation of State High School Associations
National Federation of State High School Associations
(NFHS) is the body that writes the rules of competition for most high school sports and activities in the United States. NFHS's headquarters are located in White River State Park
White River State Park
in Indianapolis, Indiana.[2]Contents1 Member and affiliate associations1.1 Member associations 1.2 Affiliate associations2 Players by sport 3 Executive Directors 4 NFHS National High School Hall of Fame 5 See also 6 References, including organizations' official websites 7 Further reading 8 External linksMember and affiliate associations[edit] Over 17,000 high schools belong to associations that are members of the NFHS. Most high schools, whether public or private, belong to their state's high school association; in turn, each state association belongs to the NFHS
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Surfboard
A surfboard is an elongated platform used in the sport of surfing. Surfboards are relatively light, but are strong enough to support an individual standing on them while riding an ocean surface wave breaking wave. They were invented in ancient Hawaii, where they were known as papa he'e nalu in the Hawaiian language, they were usually made of wood from local trees, such as koa, and were often over 15 feet (5 m) in length and extremely heavy.[1][2] Major advances over the years include the addition of one or more fins on the bottom rear of the board to improve directional stability, and numerous improvements in materials and shape. Modern surfboards are made of polyurethane or polystyrene foam covered with layers of fiberglass cloth, and polyester or epoxy resin. The result is a light and strong surfboard that is buoyant and maneuverable
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Sport Governing Body
A sports governing body is a sports organization that has a regulatory or sanctioning function. Sports governing bodies come in various forms, and have a variety of regulatory functions. Examples of this can include disciplinary action for rule infractions and deciding on rule changes in the sport that they govern. Governing bodies have different scopes. They may cover a range of sport at an International level, such as the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
and the International Paralympic Committee, or only a single sport at a national level, such as the Rugby Football League
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Balti Language
Balti (Tibetan: སྦལ་ཏི།, Wylie: bal ti skad; Nastaʿlīq script: بلتی‬) is a Tibetic language spoken in the Baltistan region of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan, the Nubra Valley
Nubra Valley
of Leh district, and in the Kargil district
Kargil district
of Jammu and Kashmir, India.[3] It is quite different from Standard Tibetan. Many sounds of Old Tibetan that were lost in Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan
are retained in the Balti language. It also has a simple pitch accent system only in multi-syllabic words[4] while Standard Tibetan
Standard Tibetan
has a complex and distinct pitch system that includes tone contour.Contents1 Ethnography 2 Classification 3 Script 4 Areas 5 Evolution 6 Literature 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksEthnography[edit] All people living in Baltistan
Baltistan
may be referred to as Balti
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Arlington Baths Club
Arlington Baths Club is a not-for-profit member-run swimming club in Glasgow, housed in a purpose-built Category A Listed Building opened on 1 August 1871. The Arlington Baths Club was the first swimming club in Glasgow. The building is in the Charing Cross area and was part of the westward development of the city. Built largely in the traditional tenement idiom, albeit with some extraordinary flourishes such as the famous Charing Cross Mansions, this area quickly attracted the well-off middle class residents who also constituted the membership of the Arlington Baths Club. The Club was therefore created on the doorstep of its membership, the great majority of whom lived within easy walking distance. From this emerged the traditions of the Club
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Bournemouth
Bournemouth
Bournemouth
/ˈbɔːrnməθ/ ( listen) is a large coastal resort town on the south coast of England
England
directly to the east of the Jurassic Coast, a 96-mile (155 km) World Heritage Site.[1] According to the 2011 census, the town has a population of 183,491 making it the largest settlement in Dorset. With Poole
Poole
to the west and Christchurch in the east, Bournemouth
Bournemouth
forms the South East Dorset conurbation, which has a total population of over 465,000. Before it was founded in 1810 by Lewis Tregonwell, the area was a deserted heathland occasionally visited by fishermen and smugglers. Initially marketed as a health resort, the town received a boost when it appeared in Augustus Granville's 1841 book, The Spas of England. Bournemouth's growth truly accelerated with the arrival of the railway and it became a recognised town in 1870
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Zone Defence
Zone defense is a type of defense, used in team sports, which is the alternative to man-to-man defense; instead of each player guarding a corresponding player on the other team, each defensive player is given an area (a zone) to cover. A zone defense can be used in many sports where defensive players guard players on the other team. Zone defenses and zone principles are commonly used in basketball, american football, association football, ice hockey, australian rules football, netball and ultimate among others.Contents1 Basketball1.1 History of basketball zone defense 1.2 Advantages 1.3 Disadvantages 1.4 Attacking a zone defense2 American football 3 Australian rules football 4 Ice hockey 5 Netball 6 Ultimate 7 See also 8 ReferencesBasketball[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Point Guard
The point guard (PG), also called the one or point, is one of the five positions in a regulation basketball game. A point guard has perhaps the most specialized role of any position. Point guards are expected to run the team's offense by controlling the ball and making sure that it gets to the right players at the right time. Above all, the point guard must totally understand and accept their coach's game plan; in this way, the position can be compared to a quarterback in American football or a playmaker in association football (soccer). While the guard must understand and accept the coach's gameplan, he must also be able to adapt to what the defense is allowing, and he also must control the pace of the game. A point guard, like other player positions in basketball, specializes in certain skills
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Sports Governing Body
A sports governing body is a sports organization that has a regulatory or sanctioning function. Sports governing bodies come in various forms, and have a variety of regulatory functions. Examples of this can include disciplinary action for rule infractions and deciding on rule changes in the sport that they govern. Governing bodies have different scopes. They may cover a range of sport at an International level, such as the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
and the International Paralympic Committee, or only a single sport at a national level, such as the Rugby Football League
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One-piece Swimsuit
A one-piece swimsuit most commonly refers to swimwear worn by women and girls when swimming in the sea or in a swimming pool, or for any activity in the sun, such as sun bathing. Today, the one-piece swimsuit is usually a skin-tight garment that covers a female's torso, except maybe the back or upper chest. Before the popularity of the two-piece swimsuit, and then the bikini, virtually all female swimwear completely covered at least the wearer's torso, and men also wore similar swimsuits. While the bikini has increasingly found popular acceptance since the 1960s, the one-piece swimsuit has maintained a place on beaches to this day. Some people consider a one-piece swimsuit to be more modest than a two-piece bikini.[citation needed]
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Offside (sport)
Offside, often pluralized as Offsides in American English, is a rule used by several different team sports regulating aspects of player positioning. It is particularly used in field sports with rules deriving from the various codes of football, such as association football, rugby union and rugby league, and in some other sports e.g. ice hockey, field hockey and bandy. Offside rules are generally designed to ensure that players play together as a team, and do not consistently position one or a few players near the opponent's goal to try to receive a "Hail Mary pass" for an easy goal without opposing players nearby
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Waikiki
Waikīkī (/waɪkiːˈkiː/; Hawaiian: [vɐjˈtiːˈtiː, wɐjˈtiːˈtiː]) (also known as Waikiki
Waikiki
Beach) is a beachfront neighborhood of Honolulu
Honolulu
on the south shore of the island of Oʻahu in the U.S. state of Hawaii
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Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
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