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Washington Irving
Washington Irving
Washington Irving
(April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American short story writer, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. He is best known for his short stories "Rip Van Winkle" (1819) and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1820), both of which appear in his collection, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent. His historical works include biographies of Oliver Goldsmith, Muhammad, and George Washington, as well as several histories of 15th-century Spain dealing with subjects such as Alhambra, Christopher Columbus, and the Moors. Irving served as the U.S. ambassador to Spain from 1842 to 1846. He made his literary debut in 1802 with a series of observational letters to the Morning Chronicle, written under the pseudonym Jonathan Oldstyle
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Charles Brockden Brown
Charles Brockden Brown
Charles Brockden Brown
(January 17, 1771 – February 22, 1810) was an American novelist, historian, and editor of the Early National period. He is generally regarded by scholars as the most important American novelist before James Fenimore Cooper. He is the most frequently studied and republished practitioner of the "early American novel," or the US novel between 1789 and roughly 1820
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Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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Thomas Campbell (poet)
Thomas Campbell (27 July 1777 – 15 June 1844) was a Scottish poet chiefly remembered for his sentimental poetry dealing especially with human affairs[vague]. He was a founder and the first President of the Clarence Club and a co-founder of the Literary Association of the Friends of Poland, he was also one of the initiators of a plan to found what became University College London. In 1799, he wrote "The Pleasures of Hope", a traditional 18th century didactic poem in heroic couplets
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Francis Jeffrey
Francis Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey
Francis Jeffrey, Lord Jeffrey
(23 October 1773 – 26 January 1850) was a Scottish judge and literary critic.Contents1 Life 2 Memorials 3 Family 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Edinburgh, the son of George Jeffrey, a clerk in the Court of Session. After attending the Royal High School for six years, he studied at the University of Glasgow
University of Glasgow
from 1787 to May 1789, and at Queen's College, Oxford, from September 1791 to June 1792. He had begun the study of law at Edinburgh
Edinburgh
before going to Oxford, and returned to it afterwards. He became a member of the Speculative Society, where he measured himself in debate with Sir Walter Scott, Lord Brougham, Francis Horner, the Marquess of Lansdowne, Lord Kinnaird and others
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Moorish Spain
Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
(Arabic: الأنْدَلُس‎, trans. al-ʼAndalus; Spanish: al-Ándalus; Portuguese: al-Ândalus; Catalan: al-Àndalus; Berber: Andalus), also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain occupying at its peak most of what are today Spain and Portugal. At its greatest geographical extent in the 8th century, a part of southern France—Septimania—was briefly under its control
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Copyright Infringement
Copyright
Copyright
infringement is the use of works protected by copyright law without permission, infringing certain exclusive rights granted to the copyright holder, such as the right to reproduce, distribute, display or perform the protected work, or to make derivative works. The copyright holder is typically the work's creator, or a publisher or other business to whom copyright has been assigned. Copyright
Copyright
holders routinely invoke legal and technological measures to prevent and penalize copyright infringement. Copyright
Copyright
infringement disputes are usually resolved through direct negotiation, a notice and take down process, or litigation in civil court. Egregious or large-scale commercial infringement, especially when it involves counterfeiting, is sometimes prosecuted via the criminal justice system
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History Of Spain
The history of Spain
Spain
dates back to the Middle Ages. In 1516, Habsburg Spain
Spain
unified a number of disparate predecessor kingdoms; its modern form of a constitutional monarchy was introduced in 1813, and the current democratic constitution dates to 1978. After the completion of the Reconquista, the kingdoms of Spain
Spain
were united under Habsburg
Habsburg
rule in 1516, that unified the Crown of Castile, the Crown of Aragon
Crown of Aragon
and smaller kingdoms under the same rule
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Orkney
Orkney
Orkney
/ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney
Orkney
Islands,[Notes 1] is an archipelago in the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney
Orkney
is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness
Caithness
and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited.[2][3][4] The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland"
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Muhammad
Muhammad[n 1] (Arabic: محمد‎; pronounced [muħammad];[n 2] French: Mahomet /məˈhɒmɪt/; Latinized as Mahometus c. 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE)[1] was the founder of Islam.[2][3] According to Islamic doctrine, he was a prophet and God's messenger, sent to present and confirm the monotheistic teachings preached previously by Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets.[3][4][5][6] He is viewed as the final prophet of God
God
in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.[n 3]
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Herman Melville
Herman Melville[a] (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period. His best known works include Typee
Typee
(1846), a romantic account of his experiences in Polynesian life, and his whaling novel Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
(1851). His work was almost forgotten during his last 30 years. His writing draws on his experience at sea as a common sailor, exploration of literature and philosophy, and engagement in the contradictions of American society in a period of rapid change. He developed a complex, baroque style; the vocabulary is rich and original, a strong sense of rhythm infuses the elaborate sentences, the imagery is often mystical or ironic, and the abundance of allusion extends to biblical scripture, myth, philosophy, literature, and the visual arts. Melville was born in New York City, the third child of a merchant in French dry goods and his wife
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George Bernard Butler
George Bernard Butler, Jr. (1838-1907) was a portrait, genre, animal, and still life painter. Butler was born in New York City, where he studied art under Thomas Hicks. In 1859 he went to Paris to study under Thomas Couture, then returned to serve in the military during the Civil War. Despite the loss of his right arm, Butler continued his art career in New York and San Francisco, and was elected a National Academician in 1873. Two years later he returned to Europe and remained in Italy for an extended period. References[edit] This article incorporates text from a free content work. Licensed under Public Domain, US Government License statement: William Crowninshield Endicott, Unknown, United States Army Center of Military History
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American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
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Yellow Fever
Yellow fever
Yellow fever
is a viral disease of typically short duration.[3] In most cases, symptoms include fever, chills, loss of appetite, nausea, muscle pains particularly in the back, and headaches.[3] Symptoms typically improve within five days.[3] In about 15% of people within a day of improving, the fever comes back, abdominal pain occurs, and liver damage begins causing yellow skin.[3][6] If this occurs, the risk of bleeding and kidney problems is also increased.[3] The disease is caused by the yellow fever virus and is spread by the bite of an infected female mosquito.[3] It infects only h
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Johnstown (city), New York
Johnstown is a city and the county seat of Fulton County in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 Census, the city had population of 8,743.[2] The city was named after its founder, Sir William Johnson.[3] The city of Johnstown is mostly surrounded by the town of Johnstown, of which it was once a part when it was a village. Also adjacent to the city is the city of Gloversville. The two cities are together known as the "Glove Cities". They are known for their history of specialty manufacturing. Johnstown is located approximately 45 miles (72 km) west of Albany, about one-third of the way between Albany and the Finger Lakes
Finger Lakes
region to the west.Contents1 History1.1 Early colonial history 1.2 Revolutionary War and aftermath 1.3 19th century to the present2 Notable people2.1 Silas Talbot 2.2 Daniel Cady 2.3 John D. McDonald 2.4 Israel T
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Essays
An essay is, generally, a piece of writing that gives the author's own argument — but the definition is vague, overlapping with those of a paper, an article, a pamphlet, and a short story. Essays have traditionally been sub-classified as formal and informal. Formal essays are characterized by "serious purpose, dignity, logical organization, length," whereas the informal essay is characterized by "the personal element (self-revelation, individual tastes and experiences, confidential manner), humor, graceful style, rambling structure, unconventionality or novelty of theme," etc.[1] Essays are commonly used as literary criticism, political manifestos, learned arguments, observations of daily life, recollections, and reflections of the author. Almost all modern essays are written in prose, but works in verse have been dubbed essays (e.g., Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism
An Essay on Criticism
and An Essay
Essay
on Man)
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