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Warner Bros. Records
Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Records Inc. is an American major record label established in 1958 as the foundation label of the present-day Warner Music Group (WMG), and now operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of that corporation. Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Records was established on March 19, 1958, as the recorded-music division of the American film studio Warner Bros.. For most of its early existence it was one of a group of labels owned and operated by larger parent corporations. The sequence of companies that controlled Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
and its allied labels evolved through a convoluted series of corporate mergers and acquisitions from the early 1960s to the early 2000s
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Leroy Carr
Leroy Carr
Leroy Carr
(March 27, 1905 – April 29, 1935)[1] was an American blues singer, songwriter and pianist who developed a laid-back, crooning technique and whose popularity and style influenced such artists as Nat King Cole
Nat King Cole
and Ray Charles. He first became famous for "How Long, How Long Blues", released by Vocalion Records
Vocalion Records
in 1928.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Discography 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Carr was born in Nashville, Tennessee, and raised in Indianapolis, Indiana. His recording career was cut short by his early death, but he produced a large body of work.[2] Some of his most famous songs include " Blues
Blues
Before Sunrise" (1932), "Midnight Hour Blues" (1932), and "Hurry Down Sunshine" (1934). He had a longtime partnership with the guitarist Scrapper Blackwell
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Red Nichols
Ernest Loring "Red" Nichols (May 8, 1905 – June 28, 1965) was an American jazz cornettist, composer, and jazz bandleader. Over his long career, Nichols recorded in a wide variety of musical styles, and critic Steve Leggett[1] describes him as "an expert cornet player, a solid improviser, and apparently a workaholic, since he is rumored to have appeared on over 4,000 recordings during the 1920s alone."Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and career 1.2 Brunswick Records
Brunswick Records
Era 1.3 Later career 1.4 Biographical film and film career2 Albums 3 Honors 4 Collaborators 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and career[edit] Nichols was born on May 8, 1905 in Ogden, Utah, United States. His father was a college music professor, and Nichols was a child prodigy, because by twelve he was already playing difficult set pieces for his father's brass band
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Music Publisher (popular Music)
In the music industry, a music publisher (or publishing company) is responsible for ensuring the songwriters and composers receive payment when their compositions are used commercially. Through an agreement called a publishing contract, a songwriter or composer "assigns" the copyright of their composition to a publishing company. In return, the company licenses compositions, helps monitor where compositions are used, collects royalties and distributes them to the composers. They also secure commissions for music and promote existing compositions to recording artists, film and television.[1] The copyrights owned and administered by publishing companies are one of the most important forms of intellectual property in the music industry
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Sound Recording And Reproduction
Sound
Sound
recording and reproduction is an electrical, mechanical, electronic, or digital inscription and re-creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice, singing, instrumental music, or sound effects. The two main classes of sound recording technology are analog recording and digital recording. Acoustic analog recording is achieved by a microphone diaphragm that senses changes in atmospheric pressure caused by acoustic sound waves and records them as a mechanical representation of the sound waves on a medium such as a phonograph record (in which a stylus cuts grooves on a record). In magnetic tape recording, the sound waves vibrate the microphone diaphragm and are converted into a varying electric current, which is then converted to a varying magnetic field by an electromagnet, which makes a representation of the sound as magnetized areas on a plastic tape with a magnetic coating on it
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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M. Witmark & Sons
M. Witmark & Sons was a leading publisher of sheet music for the United States
United States
"Tin Pan Alley" music industry.A Piece of Music Published by Witmark and Sons in 1890.The firm of Marcus Witmark & Sons was established in New York City in 1886. The father, Marcus Witmark, was the legal head of the company; but from the beginning it was run by his sons Isidore, Julius, and Jay, who were under legal age when the company started (ranging in age from 17 to 14 years old). They started out publishing their own compositions. They were adept at plugging songs, and within a few years were publishing the works of such composers as Victor Herbert, George M
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Standard (music)
In music, a standard is a musical composition of established popularity, considered part of the "standard repertoire" of one or several genres.[1][2] Even though the standard repertoire of a given genre consists of a dynamic and partly subjective set of songs, these can be identified by having been performed or recorded by a variety of musical acts, often with different arrangements. In addition, standards are extensively quoted by other works and commonly serve as the basis for musical improvisation.[3] Standards may "cross over" from one genre's repertoire to another's; for example, many jazz standards have entered the pop repertoire, and many blues standards have entered the rock repertoire. Standards exist in the classical, popular and folk music traditions of all cultures. In the context of Western classical music, the standard repertoire constitutes most of what is considered the "teaching canon", i.e
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George Gershwin
George Jacob Gershwin (/ˈɡɜːrʃ.wɪn/; September 26, 1898 – July 11, 1937) was an American composer and pianist.[1][2] Gershwin's compositions spanned both popular and classical genres, and his most popular melodies are widely known. Among his best-known works are the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue
Rhapsody in Blue
(1924) and An American in Paris
Paris
(1928), as well as the contemporary opera Porgy and Bess
Porgy and Bess
(1935). Gershwin studied piano under Charles Hambitzer
Charles Hambitzer
and composition with Rubin Goldmark, Henry Cowell
Henry Cowell
and Joseph Brody. He began his career as a song plugger, but soon started composing Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
works with his brother Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
and Buddy DeSylva
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Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
(6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century.[1] With George he wrote more than a dozen Broadway shows, featuring songs such as "I Got Rhythm", "Embraceable You", "The Man I Love" and "Someone to Watch Over Me". He was also responsible, along with DuBose Heyward, for the libretto to George's opera Porgy and Bess. The success the Gershwin brothers had with their collaborative works has often overshadowed the creative role that Ira played. His mastery of songwriting continued, however, after the early death of George
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Jerome Kern
Jerome David Kern (January 27, 1885 – November 11, 1945) was an American composer of musical theatre and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as "Ol' Man River", "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man", "A Fine Romance", "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "All the Things You Are", "The Way You Look Tonight", "Long Ago (and Far Away)" and "Who?". He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and E. Y
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Brunswick Records
Brunswick Records
Brunswick Records
is an American record label founded in 1916.Contents1 History1.1 From 1916 1.2 1920s 1.3 1930s 1.4 Since 1939 1.5 Rhythm and blues2 Ownership 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] From 1916[edit] Records under the Brunswick label were first produced by the Brunswick-Balke-Collender Company, a company based in Dubuque, Iowa which had been manufacturing products ranging from pianos to sporting equipment since 1845. The company first began producing phonographs in 1916, then began marketing their own line of records as an after-thought
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Vocalion Records
For Decca's Vocalion label, see Disques VogueThis article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Vocalion Records1921 Vocalion labelFounded 1916 (1916)Founder Aeolian Piano CompanyGenre JazzCountry of origin U.S., U.K. Vocalion Records
Vocalion Records
is an American record company and label active for many years in the U.S. and the U.K.Contents1 History 2 Notable recordings 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Vocalion (pronounced "vo-CAL-yun") was founded in 1916 by the Aeolian Piano Company of New York City, which introduced a retail line of phonographs at the same time. The name was derived from one of their corporate divisions, the Vocalion Organ Company
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Duke Ellington
Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist, and bandleader of a jazz orchestra, which he led from 1923 until his death in a career spanning over fifty years.[1] Born in Washington, D.C., Ellington was based in New York City
New York City
from the mid-1920s onward, and gained a national profile through his orchestra's appearances at the Cotton Club
Cotton Club
in Harlem. In the 1930s, his orchestra toured in Europe. Though widely considered to have been a pivotal figure in the history of jazz, Ellington embraced the phrase "beyond category" as a liberating principle, and referred to his music as part of the more general category of American Music, rather than to a musical genre such as jazz.[2] Some of the musicians who were members of Ellington's orchestra, such as saxophonist Johnny Hodges, are considered to be among the best players in jazz
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Nick Lucas
Dominic Nicholas Anthony Lucanese (August 22, 1897 – July 28, 1982), known professionally as Nick Lucas, was the first jazz guitarist to record as a soloist. His popularity during his lifetime came from his reputation as a singer. His signature song was "Tiptoe Through the Tulips". Career[edit] Lucas was born into an Italian family in Newark, New Jersey. In 1922, at the age of 25, he gained renown with his hit renditions of "Pickin' the Guitar" and "Teasin' the Frets" for Pathé Records. In 1923, Gibson Guitars
Gibson Guitars
proposed to build him a concert guitar with a deeper body. Known as the " Nick Lucas
Nick Lucas
Special," it became a popular model with guitarists. In the same year, he began recording for Brunswick and remained one of their exclusive artists until 1932. He became known as "The Crooning Troubadour".[by whom?] In 1929, Lucas co-starred in the Warner Bros
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Time Warner
Time Warner, Inc. is an American multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate headquartered in New York City.[7] It is currently the world's third largest entertainment company in terms of revenue, after Comcast
Comcast
and The Walt Disney Company. It was also once the world's largest media conglomerate.[8] Time Warner
Time Warner
was first founded in 1990, with the merger of Time Inc.
Time Inc.
and Warner Communications. The current company consists largely of the assets of the former Warner Communications
Warner Communications
(as well as HBO, a Time Inc. subsidiary prior to the merger), and the assets of Turner Broadcasting (which was acquired by the company in 1996). Despite spinning off Time Inc
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