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Wards And Electoral Divisions Of The United Kingdom
The wards and electoral divisions in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are electoral districts at sub-national level represented by one or more councillors. The ward is the primary unit of English electoral geography for civil parishes and borough and district councils, electoral ward is the unit used by Welsh principal councils, while the electoral division is the unit used by English county councils and some unitary authorities
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Northumberland
Northumberland
Northumberland
(/nɔːrˈθʌmbərlənd/;[2] abbreviated Northd) is a county in North East England. The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria
Cumbria
to the west, County Durham
County Durham
and Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
to the south and the Scottish Borders
Scottish Borders
to the north
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Principal Areas Of Wales
For local government purposes, Wales
Wales
has since 1 April 1996 been divided into 22 single-tier principal areas.[1] The elected councils of these areas are responsible for the provision of all local government services, including education, social work, environmental protection, and most highways
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Cumberland
Cumberland (/ˈkʌmbərlənd/ KUM-bər-lənd; locally /ˈkʊmbələnd/ KUUM-bə-lənd) is a historic county of North West England that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It was bordered by Northumberland to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire to the south, and the Scottish counties of Dumfriesshire and Roxburghshire to the north
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Westmorland
Westmorland (/ˈwɛstmərlənd/; formerly also spelt Westmoreland;[6] even older spellings are Westmerland and Westmereland) is a historic county in north west England. It formed an administrative county between 1889 and 1974, after which the whole county was administered by the new administrative county of Cumbria. In 2013, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, Eric Pickles, formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Westmorland.[3][4][5]Contents1 Early history1.1 Division into wards2 Modern history 3 Coat of arms 4 Legacy 5 Notable people 6 Surnames 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly history[edit] At the time of Domesday Book in 1086, parts of the county were considered either to form part of Yorkshire or to be within the separate Kingdom of Strathclyde
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County Durham
County Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜːrəm/) is a county[N 1] in North East England.[2] The county town is Durham, a cathedral city. The largest settlement is Darlington, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south.[3] The county's historic boundaries stretch between the rivers Tyne and Tees, and so includes places such as Gateshead, Jarrow, South Shields and Sunderland. During the Middle Ages the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert being in Durham Cathedral, and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham. The county has a mixture of mining and farming heritage, as well as a heavy railway industry, particularly in the southeast of the county in Darlington, Shildon and Stockton
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Hundred (county Subdivision)
A hundred is an administrative division that is geographically part of a larger region. It was formerly used in England, Wales, some parts of the United States, Denmark, Southern Schleswig, Sweden, Finland, Estonia
Estonia
and Norway
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Wapentakes
A hundred is an administrative division that is geographically part of a larger region. It was formerly used in England, Wales, some parts of the United States, Denmark, Southern Schleswig, Sweden, Finland, Estonia
Estonia
and Norway
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Community (Wales)
A community (Welsh: cymuned) is a division of land in Wales
Wales
that forms the lowest tier of local government in Wales. Welsh communities are analogous to civil parishes in England. In 2016 there were 870 communities in Wales. Until 1974 Wales
Wales
was divided into civil parishes.[1] These were abolished by section 20 (6) of the Local Government Act 1972, and replaced by communities by section 27 of the same Act. The principal areas of Wales
Wales
are divided entirely into communities. Unlike in England, where unparished areas exist, no part of Wales
Wales
is outside a community, even in urban areas.[1] Most, but not all, communities are administered by Community councils, which are equivalent to English parish councils in terms of their powers and the way they operate. Welsh community councils may call themselves town councils unilaterally and may have city status granted by the Crown
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Civil Parishes In England
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Single Transferable Vote
The single transferable vote (STV) is a voting system designed to achieve proportional representation through ranked voting in multi-seat organizations or constituencies (voting districts).[1] Under STV, an elector (voter) has a single vote that is initially allocated to their most preferred candidate and, as the count proceeds and candidates are either elected or eliminated, is transferred to other candidates according to the voter's stated preferences, in proportion to any surplus or discarded votes
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Local Government In Scotland
Local government in Scotland
Scotland
is organised through 32 unitary authorities[1] designated as Councils[2] which consist of councillors elected every five years by registered voters in each of the council areas. Councils receive the majority of their funding from the Scottish Government,[3] through Aggregate External Finance (AEF). AEF consists of three parts: Revenue Support Grants, Non-Domestic Rates, and Income and Specific Grants.[4] The level of central government support for each authority is determined by the Cabinet Secretary for Finance and the Constitution, currently Derek Mackay
Derek Mackay
MSP, and is distributed by the Finance and Central Services Department of the Scottish Government
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Local Government Boundary Commission For Scotland
The Local Government Boundary Commission for Scotland
Scotland
is an independent body in Scotland
Scotland
created under the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973. According to its website,[1] it is responsible for: carrying out reviews of boundaries of local authority areas; reviews of electoral arrangements for local authorities; responding to requests for ad hoc reviews of electoral or administrative arrangements; and advising on wards for Health Board elections. Its work relates to the local government of Scotland, and it reports to the Scottish Government
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Local Government In Northern Ireland
 a Lowercase "d" per here.AssemblySpeaker Robin Newton MLAActs Committees Statutory rules Members (MLA)LawSupreme Court (UK) Courts of Northern Ireland Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in the UKHer Majesty's Government Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
OfficeSecretary of StateRt. Hon. James Brokenshire
James Brokenshire
MPParliament of the United KingdomDirect rule Grand Committee Select CommitteeElectionsCurrent MPs for Westminster Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in the EUEuropean Parliament electionsConstituencyLocal governmentAdministrative divisionsCounties DistrictsOther countries Atlasv t e Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is divided into 11 districts for local government purposes
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Single Transferable Vote
The single transferable vote (STV) is a voting system designed to achieve proportional representation through ranked voting in multi-seat organizations or constituencies (voting districts).[1] Under STV, an elector (voter) has a single vote that is initially allocated to their most preferred candidate and, as the count proceeds and candidates are either elected or eliminated, is transferred to other candidates according to the voter's stated preferences, in proportion to any surplus or discarded votes
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