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War Department Light Railways
The War Department Light Railways
War Department Light Railways
were a system of narrow gauge trench railways run by the British War Department in World War I. Light railways made an important contribution to the Allied war effort in the First World War, and were used for the supply of ammunition and stores, the transport of troops and the evacuation of the wounded.Contents1 Track gauges 2 Development 3 WDLR locomotives3.1 Steam 3.2 Internal combustion 3.3 Captured4 Other locomotives4.1 French Army 4.2 U.S
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Decauville
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t e Decauville
Decauville
(French: [dəkovil]) was a manufacturing company was founded by Paul Decauville
Paul Decauville
(1846–1922), a French pioneer in industrial railways. Decauville's major innovation was the use of ready-made sections of light, narrow gauge track fastened to steel sleepers; this track was portable and could be disassembled and transported very easily. The first Decauville
Decauville
railway used 400 mm (15 3⁄4 in) gauge; Decauville
Decauville
later refined his invention and switched to 500 mm (19 3⁄4 in) and 600 mm (1 ft 11 5⁄8 in) gauge.Contents1 History1.1 Military use 1.2 Civilian use2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Starting in 1875, his company produced track elements, engines and cars
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Pounds Per Square Inch
The pound per square inch or, more accurately, pound-force per square inch (symbol: lbf/in2;[1] abbreviation: psi) is a unit of pressure or of stress based on avoirdupois units. It is the pressure resulting from a force of one pound-force applied to an area of one square inch. In SI units, 1 psi is approximately equal to 6895 N/m2. Pounds per square inch
Pounds per square inch
absolute (psia) is used to make it clear that the pressure is relative to a vacuum rather than the ambient atmospheric pressure. Since atmospheric pressure at sea level is around 14.7 psi, this will be added to any pressure reading made in air at sea level. The converse is pounds per square inch gauge (psig), indicating that the pressure is relative to atmospheric pressure
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Royal Engineers
The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. It provides military engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces
British Armed Forces
and is headed by the Chief Royal Engineer. The Regimental Headquarters and the Royal School of Military Engineering are in Chatham in Kent, England. The corps is divided into several regiments, barracked at various places in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and around the world.Contents1 History 2 Significant constructions2.1 British Columbia 2.2 Royal Albert Hall 2.3 Indian infrastructure 2.4 Rideau Canal 2.5 Dover's Western Heights 2.6 Pentonville Prison 2.7 Boundary Commissions 2.8 Abney Level 2.9 H.M
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Canadian Corps
The Canadian Corps
Corps
was a World War I
World War I
corps formed from the Canadian Expeditionary Force in September 1915 after the arrival of the 2nd Canadian Division in France. The corps was expanded by the addition of the 3rd Canadian Division
3rd Canadian Division
in December 1915 and the 4th Canadian Division in August 1916. The organization of a 5th Canadian Division began in February 1917 but it was still not fully formed when it was broken up in February 1918 and its men used to reinforce the other four divisions. The majority of soldiers of the Canadian Corps
Corps
were British-born until near the end of the war, when the number of those of Canadian birth who had enlisted rose to 51 percent.[1] They were mostly volunteers, as conscription was not implemented until the end of the war (see Conscription Crisis of 1917)
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Vimy
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Vimy
Vimy
(/ˈviːmi/ or /ˈvɪmi/; French pronunciation: ​[vimi]) is a commune in the Pas-de-Calais
Pas-de-Calais
department in the Hauts-de-France region of France. It is located 3.8 kilometres (2.4 mi) east of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial
Canadian National Vimy Memorial
dedicated to the Battle of Vimy Ridge and the Canadian soldiers who were killed during the war
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Amiens
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Amiens
Amiens
(French pronunciation: ​[amjɛ̃]) is a city and commune in northern France, 120 km (75 mi) north of Paris
Paris
and 100 km (62 mi) south-west of Lille. It is the capital of the Somme department in Hauts-de-France. The city had a population of 136,105 according to the 2006 census. It has one of the biggest university hospitals in France
France
with a capacity of 1,200 beds. Amiens
Amiens
Cathedral, the tallest of the large, classic, Gothic churches of the 13th century and the largest in France
France
of its kind, is a World Heritage Site
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Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
(/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the ( Ojibwe
Ojibwe
word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan
Michigan
is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan
Michigan
is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan
Michigan
was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten
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Robert Hudson (company)
Robert Hudson Ltd was a major international supplier of light railway materials, based in Gildersome, near Leeds, England. The name was later changed to Robert Hudson (Raletrux) Ltd.Contents1 The business 2 Overseas branches 3 Products3.1 Wagons 3.2 Track and track components 3.3 Steam locomotives 3.4 Petrol and diesel locomotives 3.5 Mining equipment 3.6 Catalogue 3.7 Road vehicles4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksThe business[edit] The business was founded in 1865 by Robert Hudson at Gildersome, near Leeds.[1]:Intro The Hudson family owned the local Victoria Colliery in Bruntcliffe, Morley. To improve access to the works a connection with the Great Northern Railway main line from Wakefield
Wakefield
to Bradford
Bradford
was established in 1890 thus allowing raw materials and finished goods to be transported by rail
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Andrew Barclay & Sons Co.
Andrew Barclay Sons & Co. are a builder of steam and later fireless and diesel locomotives. The company's history dates to foundation of an engineering workshop in 1840 in Kilmarnock, Scotland. After a long period of operation the company was acquired by the Hunslet group in 1972 and renamed Hunslet-Barclay; in 2007 the company changed hands after bankruptcy becoming Brush-Barclay
Brush-Barclay
as part of the FKI Group
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Hundredweight
The hundredweight (abbreviation: cwt), formerly also known as the centum weight or quintal, is an English, imperial, and US customary unit of weight or mass of various values. Its present value continues to differ between the American and imperial systems
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Pascal (unit)
The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of pressure used to quantify internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus
Young's modulus
and ultimate tensile strength
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Baldwin Locomotive Works
Coordinates: 39°51′33″N 75°19′38″W / 39.85917°N 75.32722°W / 39.85917; -75.32722Baldwin Locomotive
Locomotive
WorksBaldwin Locomotive
Locomotive
Works in 1875Industry RailwayFate BankruptcyFounded Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S. (1825)Founder Matthias W. BaldwinDefunct 1972Headquarters Eddystone, Pennsylvania, U.S.Products LocomotivesBaldwin Locomotive
Locomotive
Works builder's plate, 1922Baldwin Locomotive
Locomotive
Works c. 1900The Baldwin Locomotive
Locomotive
Works was an American manufacturer of railroad locomotives from 1825 to 1956. Originally located in Philadelphia, it moved to nearby Eddystone, Pennsylvania, in the early 20th century. The company was for decades the world's largest producer of steam locomotives, but struggled to compete as demand switched to diesel locomotives
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Pound (force)
The pound-force (symbol: lbf[1], sometimes lbf,[2]) is a unit of force used in some systems of measurement including English Engineering units and the British Gravitational System.[3] Pound force should not be confused with foot-pounds or pound-feet, which are units of torque, and may be written as "lbf⋅ft". They should not be confused with pound-mass (symbol: lb), often simply called pounds, which is a unit of mass.Contents1 Definitions1.1 Product of avoirdupois pound and standard gravity2 Conversion to other units 3 Foot–pound–second (FPS) systems of units 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesDefinitions[edit] The pound-force is equal to the gravitational force exerted on a mass of one avoirdupois pound on the surface of Earth
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Newton (unit)
The newton (symbol: N) is the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) derived unit of force. It is named after Isaac Newton
Isaac Newton
in recognition of his work on classical mechanics, specifically Newton's second law of motion. See below for the conversion factors.Contents1 Definition 2 Examples 3 Commonly seen as kilonewtons 4 Conversion factors 5 See also 6 Notes and referencesDefinition[edit] One newton is the force needed to accelerate one kilogram of mass at the rate of one metre per second squared in the direction of the applied force. In 1946, Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures (CGPM) Resolution 2 standardized the unit of force in the MKS system of units to be the amount needed to accelerate 1 kilogram of mass at the rate of 1 metre per second squared
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Long Ton
Long ton,[1] also known as the imperial ton or displacement ton,[1][2] is the name for the unit called the "ton" in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements. It was standardised in the thirteenth century and is used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and several other British Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
countries alongside the mass-based metric tonne defined in 1799. It is not to be confused with the short ton a unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds (907.18474 kg) used in the United States and in Canada before metrication also referred to simply as a "ton".Contents1 Unit definition 2 Unit equivalences 3 International usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesUnit definition[edit] A long ton is defined as exactly 2,240 pounds
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