HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Wang Ximeng
Wang Ximeng
Wang Ximeng
(Chinese: 王希孟; pinyin: Wáng Xīmèng; Wade–Giles: Wang Hsi-meng) (1096–1119)[1] was a Chinese painter during the Song Dynasty, the early twelfth century. A prodigy,[1] Wang was one of the most renowned court painters of the Northern Song
Northern Song
period, and was taught personally by Emperor Huizong of Song
Emperor Huizong of Song
himself
[...More...]

picture info

Chinese Language
Legend:   Countries identified Chinese as a primary, administrative, or native language   Countries with more than 5,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 1,000,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 500,000 Chinese speakers   Countries with more than 100,000 Chinese speakers   Major Chinese-speaking settlementsThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

picture info

Beijing
Beijing
Beijing
(/beɪˈdʒɪŋ/;[9] Mandarin: [pèi.tɕíŋ] ( listen)), formerly romanized as Peking,[10] is the capital of the People's Republic of China, the world's second most populous city proper, and most populous capital city
[...More...]

picture info

Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
[...More...]

picture info

Yale University Press
Yale University
Yale University
Press is a university press associated with Yale University. It was founded in 1908 by George Parmly Day,[3] and became an official department of Yale University
Yale University
in 1961, but it remains financially and operationally autonomous. As of 2009[update], Yale University
Yale University
Press published approximately 300 new hardcover and 150 new paperback books annually and has more than 6,000 books in print
[...More...]

Pergamon Press
Pergamon
Pergamon
Press was an Oxford-based publishing house, founded by Paul Rosbaud and Robert Maxwell, which published scientific and medical books and journals. Originally called Butterworth-Springer, it is now an imprint of Elsevier. History[edit] The core company, Butterworth-Springer, started in 1948 to bring the "Springer know-how and techniques of aggressive publishing in science"[1] to Britain. Paul Rosbaud was the man with the knowledge. When Maxwell acquired the company in 1951, Rosbaud held a one-quarter share.[1] They changed the house name to Pergamon
Pergamon
Press, using a logo that was a reproduction of a Greek coin from Pergamon
[...More...]

picture info

Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

picture info

Palace Museum
The Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty
Ming dynasty
to the end of the Qing dynasty—the years 1420 to 1912, it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City
The Forbidden City
served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years. Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings[2] and covers 72 hectares (over 180 acres).[3][4] The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture,[5] and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia
East Asia
and elsewhere
[...More...]

picture info

Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier forms of romanizations of Chinese
[...More...]

picture info

Chinese Art
Chinese art
Chinese art
is visual art that, whether ancient or modern, originated in or is practiced in China or by Chinese artists. The Chinese art
Chinese art
in the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan) and that of overseas Chinese can also be considered part of Chinese art
Chinese art
where it is based in or draws on Chinese heritage and Chinese culture
[...More...]

picture info

Emperor Huizong Of Song
Emperor Huizong of Song
Emperor Huizong of Song
(7 June 1082[citation needed] – 4 June 1135), personal name Zhao Ji, was the eighth emperor of the Song dynasty in China. He was also a very well-known calligrapher. Born as the 11th son of Emperor Shenzong, he ascended the throne in 1100 upon the death of his elder brother and predecessor, Emperor Zhezong, because Emperor Zhezong's only son died prematurely. He lived in luxury, sophistication and art in the first half of his life. In 1126, when the Jurchen-led Jin dynasty invaded the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
during the Jin–Song Wars, Emperor Huizong abdicated and passed on his throne to his eldest son, Emperor Qinzong, while he assumed the honorary title of Taishang Huang (or "Retired Emperor"). The following year, the Song capital, Bianjing, was conquered by Jin forces in an event historically known as the Jingkang Incident
[...More...]

picture info

Northern Song
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
[...More...]

picture info

Song Dynasty
The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
(/sɔːŋ/;[3] Chinese: 宋朝; pinyin: Sòng cháo; 960–1279) was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and continued until 1279. It was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia
Western Xia
dynasties in the north and was conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass. The Song dynasty
Song dynasty
is divided into two distinct periods, Northern and Southern
[...More...]

picture info

Chinese People
Chinese people
Chinese people
are the various individuals or ethnic groups associated with China,[1] usually through ancestry, ethnicity, nationality, citizenship or other affiliation
[...More...]

.