HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Walter Burkert
Walter Burkert (German: [ˈbʊɐ̯kɐt]; born 2 February 1931, Neuendettelsau; died 11 March 2015, Zurich)[1] was a German scholar of Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and cult. A professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, he taught in the UK and the US
[...More...]

picture info

The Odyssey
The Odyssey
The Odyssey
(/ˈɒdəsi/;[1] Greek: Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia, pronounced [o.dýs.sej.ja] in Classical Attic) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey
The Odyssey
is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad
Iliad
is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey
Odyssey
was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia.[2] The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus
Odysseus
(known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy
[...More...]

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

picture info

Ethology
Ethology
Ethology
is the scientific and objective study of animal behaviour, usually with a focus on behaviour under natural conditions, and viewing behaviour as an evolutionarily adaptive trait.[1] Behaviourism is a term that also describes the scientific and objective study of animal behaviour, usually referring to measured responses to stimuli or trained behavioural responses in a laboratory context, without a particular emphasis on evolutionary adaptivity.[2] Many naturalists have studied aspects of animal behaviour throughout history. Ethology has its scientific roots in the work of Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
and of American and German ornithologists of the late 19th and early 20th century, including Charles O. Whitman, Oskar Heinroth, and Wallace Craig
[...More...]

picture info

Konrad Lorenz
Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (German pronunciation: [ˈkɔnʁaːt ˈloːʁɛnts]; 7 November 1903 – 27 February 1989) was an Austrian zoologist, ethologist, and ornithologist. He shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Nikolaas Tinbergen
Nikolaas Tinbergen
and Karl von Frisch. He is often regarded as one of the founders of modern ethology, the study of animal behaviour. He developed an approach that began with an earlier generation, including his teacher Oskar Heinroth.[1] Lorenz studied instinctive behavior in animals, especially in greylag geese and jackdaws. Working with geese, he investigated the principle of imprinting, the process by which some nidifugous birds (i.e. birds that leave their nest early) bond instinctively with the first moving object that they see within the first hours of hatching. Although Lorenz did not discover the topic, he became widely known for his descriptions of imprinting as an instinctive bond
[...More...]

On Aggression
On Aggression
Aggression
(German: Das sogenannte Böse zur Naturgeschichte der Aggression) is a 1963 book by the ethologist Konrad Lorenz; it was translated into English in 1966.[1] As he writes in the prologue, "the subject of this book is aggression, that is to say the fighting instinct in beast and man which is directed against members of the same species." (Page 3) According to Lorenz, animals, particularly males, are biologically programmed to fight over resources. This behavior must be considered part of natural selection, as aggression leading to death or serious injury may eventually lead to extinction unless it has such a role. However, Lorenz does not state that aggressive behaviors are in any way more powerful, prevalent, or intense than more peaceful behaviors such as mating rituals
[...More...]

picture info

Zurich
Zürich
Zürich
or Zurich (/ˈzjʊərɪk/ ZEWR-ik) is the largest city in Switzerland
Switzerland
and the capital of the canton of Zürich. It is located in north-central Switzerland[3] at the northwestern tip of Lake Zürich. The municipality has approximately 400,028[4] inhabitants, the urban agglomeration 1.315 million[5] and the Zürich metropolitan area
Zürich metropolitan area
1.83 million.[6] Zürich
Zürich
is a hub for railways, roads, and air traffic. Both Zürich Airport
Zürich Airport
and railway station are the largest and busiest in the country. Permanently settled for over 2000 years, Zürich
Zürich
was founded by the Romans, who, in 15 BC, called it Turicum
[...More...]

Habilitationsschrift
Habilitation defines the qualification to conduct self-contained university teaching and is the key for access to a professorship in many European countries. Despite all changes implemented in the European higher education systems during the Bologna Process, it is the highest qualification level issued through the process of a university examination and remains a core concept of scientific careers in these countries.[1] The degree is conferred for a habilitation thesis based on independent scholarship, which was reviewed by and successfully defended before an academic committee in a process similar to that of a doctoral dissertation
[...More...]

picture info

Harvard University Press
Harvard University
Harvard University
Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.[2] It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, the university appointed as Director George Andreou.[3] The press maintains offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Cambridge, Massachusetts
near Harvard Square, and in London, England. The press co-founded the distributor TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press
MIT Press
and Yale University Press.[4] TriLiteral was sold to LSC Communications
LSC Communications
in 2018.[5] Notable authors published by HUP include Eudora Welty, Walter Benjamin, E. O
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

University Of California
Coordinates: 37°48′08″N 122°16′17″W / 37.802168°N 122.271281°W / 37.802168; -122.271281 University
University
of CaliforniaMotto Fiat lux
Fiat lux
(Latin)


[...More...]

picture info

University Of Chicago Press
The University of Chicago
University of Chicago
Press is the largest and one of the oldest university presses in the United States.[3] It is operated by the University of Chicago
[...More...]

Thebes (Egypt)
Thebes
Thebes
may refer to one of the following places:Thebes, Egypt, Thebes
Thebes
of the Hundred Gates, one-time capital of the New Kingdom of Egypt Thebes, Greece, a city in Boeotia
[...More...]

picture info

Iliad
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
[...More...]

picture info

Human Sacrifice
Note: Varies by jurisdictionAssassination Cannibalism Child murder Consensual homicide Contract killing Crime of passion Depraved-heart murder Execution-style murder Felony murder rule Feticide Honor killing Human sacrifice InfanticideChild sacrificeInternet homicide Lonely hearts killer Lust murder Lynching Mass murder Mass shooting Misdemeanor murder Murder–suicide Poisoning Proxy murder Pseudocommando Serial killer Spree killer Thrill killing Torture murder Vehicle-ramming attackManslaughterIn English law Voluntary manslaughter Negligent homicide Vehicular homicideNon-criminal homicideNote: Varies by jurisdictionAssisted suicide Capital punishment Euthanasia Feticide Justifiable homicide WarBy victim or victimsSuicideFamily Avunculi
[...More...]

picture info

Lydia
Lydia
Lydia
(Assyrian: Luddu; Greek: Λυδία, Lydía; Turkish: Lidya) was an Iron Age
Iron Age
kingdom of western Asia Minor
Asia Minor
located generally east of ancient Ionia
Ionia
in the modern western Turkish provinces of Uşak, Manisa and inland İzmir. Its population spoke an Anatolian language known as Lydian. Its capital was Sardis.[1] The Kingdom of Lydia
Lydia
existed from about 1200 BCE to 546 BCE. At its greatest extent during the 7th century BCE, it covered all of western Anatolia. In 546 BCE, it became a province of the Achaemenid Persian Empire, known as the satrapy of Lydia
Lydia
or Sparda in Old Persian
[...More...]