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Albrecht Von Bonstetten
Albrecht von Bonstetten (c. 1443-c. 1504) was a Swiss humanist of the later 15th century. A member of the baronial von Bonstetten family, he entered Einsiedeln Abbey at a young age, and after studies in Fribourg and Basel he returned to Einsiedeln and was made deacon in 1469. He studied canon law at Pavia and was ordained a priest in 1474, and he received the title of doctor utriusque iuris from Emperor Maximilian in 1498. He is the author of a number of religious and historiographical works in Latin. His Superioris Germaniae Confoederationis descriptio (written in 1479) is the oldest geographic description of the Old Swiss Confederacy (called by von Bonstetten the "Upper German Confederacy"; the adoption of the name of Schwyz developed after his time). The work was presented to the king of France and the Doge of Venice in 1479, and was combined with a description of Burgundy in a new edition for pope Sixtus IV in 1480
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Lucerne
Lucerne (/lˈsɜːrn/ loo-SURN, French: [lysɛʁn]; German: Luzern [luˈtsɛrn] (listen); Lucerne German: Lozärn; Italian: Lucerna [luˈtʃɛrna]; Romansh: Lucerna [luˈtsɛrnɐ] (listen)) is a city in central Switzerland, in the German-speaking portion of the country. Lucerne is the capital of the canton of Lucerne and part of the district of the same name. With a population of approximately 82,000 people,[3] Lucerne is the most populous town in Central Switzerland, and a nexus of economics, transportation, culture, and media in the region
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Deutsches Wörterbuch
The Deutsches Wörterbuch (German: [ˌdɔʏtʃəs ˈvœʁtɐbuːx]; "The German Dictionary"), abbreviated DWB, is the largest and most comprehensive dictionary of the German language in existence.[1][2] Encompassing modern High German vocabulary in use since 1450, it also includes loanwords adopted from other languages into German. Entries cover the etymology, meanings, attested forms, synonyms, usage peculiarities, and regional differences of words found throughout the German speaking world. The dictionary's historical linguistics approach, illuminated by examples from primary source documents, makes it to German what the Oxford English Dictionary is to English.[3] The first completed DWB lists over 330,000 headwords in 67,000 print columns spanning 32 volumes.[4] The Deutsches Wörterbuch was begun by the Brothers Grimm in 1838 and the initial volumes were published in 1854
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Frederick The Fair

Frederick the Handsome (German: Friedrich der Schöne) or the Fair (c. 1289 – 13 January 1330), from the House of Habsburg, was Duke of Austria and Styria from 1308 as Frederick I as well as King of Germany (King of the Romans) from 1314 (anti-king until 1325) as Frederick III until his death.

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Middle High German
Middle High German (abbreviated MHG, German: Mittelhochdeutsch, abbr. Mhd.) is the term for the form of German spoken in the High Middle Ages. It is conventionally dated between 1050 and 1350, developing from Old High German and into Early New High German. High German is defined as those varieties of German which were affected by the Second Sound Shift; the Middle Low German and Middle Dutch languages spoken to the North and North West, which did not participate in this sound change, are not part of MHG. While there is no standard MHG, the prestige of the Hohenstaufen court gave rise in the late 12th century to a supra-regional literary language (mittelhochdeutsche Dichtersprache) based on Swabian, an Alemannic dialect
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Eidgenossenschaft
Eidgenossenschaft (German pronunciation: [ˈaɪdɡəˌnɔsənʃaft]) is a German word specific to the political history of Switzerland. It means "oath commonwealth" or "oath alliance" in reference to the "eternal pacts" formed between the Eight Cantons of the Old Swiss Confederacy of the late medieval period, most notably in Swiss historiography being the Rütlischwur between the three founding cantons Uri, Schwyz and Unterwalden, traditionally dated to 1307. In modern usage, it is the German term used as equivalent with "Confederation" in the official name of Switzerland, Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, rendered Confédération and Confederazione in French and Italian, respectively
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