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WWT London Wetlands Centre
WWT London
London
Wetland
Wetland
Centre is a wetland reserve managed by the Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust in the Barnes area of the London
London
Borough of Richmond upon Thames, southwest London, England, by Barn Elms. The site is formed of four disused Victorian reservoirs tucked into a loop in the Thames. The centre first opened in 2000, and in 2002 an area of 29.9 hectares was designated a Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
as the Barn Elms Wetland
Wetland
Centre.[1] The centre occupies more than 100 acres (40 hectares) of land which was formerly occupied by several small reservoirs. These were converted into a wide range of wetland features and habitats before the centre opened in May 2000
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Site Of Special Scientific Interest
A Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest (SSSI) in Great Britain
Great Britain
or an Area of Special
Special
Scientific Interest (ASSI) in the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Isle of Man. SSSI/ASSIs are the basic building block of site-based nature conservation legislation and most other legal nature/geological conservation designations in the United Kingdom are based upon them, including national nature reserves, Ramsar sites, Special
Special
Protection Areas, and Special
Special
Areas of Conservation
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Backswamp
In geology backswamp is the section of a floodplain where deposits of fine silts and clays settle after a flood.[1] Backswamps usually lie behind a stream's natural levees.[2] See also[edit]Wetlands portalReferences[edit]^ Smith, Bob. "Coastal Backswamps... Restoring their value". NSW Department of Primary Industries. Retrieved 2009-05-18.  ^ "Geologylink - Glossary B"
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Black-necked Swan
The black-necked swan (Cygnus melancoryphus) is a swan that is the largest waterfowl native to South America.Contents1 Description 2 Gallery 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksDescription[edit] Adults average 102 to 124 cm (40 to 49 in) and weigh 3.5 to 6.7 kg (7.7 to 14.8 lb).[3] The wingspan ranges from 135 to 177 cm (53 to 70 in).[4] The body plumage is white with a black neck and head and greyish bill. It has a red knob near the base of the bill and white stripe behind eye. The sexes are similar, with the female slightly smaller. The cygnet has a light grey plumage with black bill and feet. The black-necked swan was formerly placed in monotypic genus, Sthenelides. The smallest member in its genus, it is found in freshwater marshes, lagoon and lake shores in southern South America. The black-necked swan breeds in Chilean Southern Zone, Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
and on the Falkland Islands
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Coscoroba Swan
The coscoroba swan (Coscoroba coscoroba) is a species of waterfowl endemic to southern South America. It is the smallest of the birds called "swans", but still a large species of waterfowl. It belongs to the subfamily Anserinae
Anserinae
in the family of ducks, swans, and geese, Anatidae. It is placed in the monotypic genus Coscoroba. The coscoroba swan is traditionally considered as an early branch from the common ancestor leading to true geese and swans, and recently genetic studies have associated a phylogenetic relationship between this species and Cape Barren goose (Cereopsis novaehollandiae) as sister groups.[2]Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Behavior 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit]FlyingMale coscoroba swans weigh 3.8–5.4 kg (8.4–11.9 lb) and females weigh 3.2–4.5 kg (7.1–9.9 lb)
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Demoiselle Crane
The demoiselle crane (Grus virgo) is a species of crane found in central Eurasia, ranging from the Black Sea to Mongolia and North Eastern China. There is also a small breeding population in Turkey. These cranes are migratory birds. Birds from western Eurasia
Eurasia
will spend the winter in Africa
Africa
whilst the birds from Asia, Mongolia and China will spend the winter in the Indian subcontinent. The bird is symbolically significant in the Culture of India and Pakistan, where it is known as Koonj.[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Life 3 Symbolism in North Indian culture 4 References 5 External linksCharacteristics[edit]Individual from Tal Chhapar Sanctuary, Churu, RajasthanThe demoiselle is 85–100 cm (33.5–39.5 in) long, 76 cm (30 in) tall and has a 155–180 cm (61–71 in) wingspan. It weighs 2–3 kg (4.4–6.6 lb)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Acrotelm
The acrotelm is one of two distinct layers in undisturbed peat bogs. It overlies the catotelm. The boundary between the two layers is defined by the transition from peat containing living plants (acrotelm) to peat containing dead plant material (catotelm)
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A Directory Of Important Wetlands In Australia
A Directory of Important Wetlands in Australia
Australia
(DIWA) is a list of wetlands of national importance to Australia. Intended to augment the list of wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention, it was formerly published in report form, but is now essentially an online publication
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Aquatic Ecosystem
An aquatic ecosystem is an ecosystem in a body of water. Communities of organisms that are dependent on each other and on their environment live in aquatic ecosystems. The two main types of aquatic ecosystems are marine ecosystems and freshwater ecosystems.[1]Contents1 Types1.1 Marine 1.2 Freshwater 1.3 Lentic1.3.1 Ponds1.4 Lotic 1.5 Wetlands2 Functions 3 Abiotic characteristics 4 Biotic characteristics4.1 Autotrophic organisms 4.2 Heterotrophic
Heterotrophic
organisms5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksTypes[edit] Marine[edit] Main article: Marine ecosystem Marine ecosystems cover approximately 71% of the Earth's surface
Earth's surface
and contain approximately 97% of the planet's water. They generate 32% of the world's net primary production.[2] They are distinguished from freshwater ecosystems by the presence of dissolved compounds, especially salts, in the water
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Aquatic Plant
Aquatic plants are plants that have adapted to living in aquatic environments (saltwater or freshwater). They are also referred to as hydrophytes or macrophytes. These plants require special adaptations for living submerged in water, or at the water's surface. The most common adaptation is aerenchyma, but floating leaves and finely dissected leaves are also common.[1][2][3] Aquatic plants can only grow in water or in soil that is permanently saturated with water. They are therefore a common component of wetlands.[4] The principal factor controlling the distribution of aquatic plants is the depth and duration of flooding. However, other factors may also control their distribution, abundance, and growth form, including nutrients, disturbance from waves, grazing, and salinity.[4] Aquatic vascular plants have originated on multiple occasions in different plant families;[1][5] they can be ferns or angiosperms (including both monocots and dicots)
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Atchafalaya Basin
The Atchafalaya Basin, or Atchafalaya Swamp
Swamp
(/əˌtʃæfəˈlaɪə/; Louisiana
Louisiana
French: L'Atchafalaya, [latʃafalaˈja]), is the largest wetland and swamp in the United States. Located in south central Louisiana, it is a combination of wetlands and river delta area where the Atchafalaya River
Atchafalaya River
and the Gulf of Mexico
Gulf of Mexico
converge. The river stretches from near Simmesport in the north through parts of eight parishes to the Morgan City southern area. The Atchafalaya is different among Louisiana
Louisiana
basins because it has a growing delta system (see illustration) with wetlands that are almost stable.[1] The basin contains about 70% forest habitat and about 30% marsh and open water
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Bayou
In usage in the United States, a bayou (/ˈbaɪ.uː/ or /ˈbaɪ.oʊ/,[1][2] from Cajun
Cajun
French) is a body of water typically found in a flat, low-lying area, and can be either an extremely slow-moving stream or river (often with a poorly defined shoreline), or a marshy lake or wetland. The term bayou can also refer to a creek whose current reverses daily due to tides and which contains brackish water highly conducive to fish life and plankton. Bayous are commonly found in the Gulf Coast region of the southern United States, notably the Mississippi River Delta, with the states of Louisiana
Louisiana
and Texas being famous for them. A bayou is frequently an anabranch or minor braid of a braided channel that is moving much more slowly than the mainstem, often becoming boggy and stagnant
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Parrot
Cacatuoidea
Cacatuoidea
(cockatoos) Psittacoidea
Psittacoidea
(true parrots) Strigopoidea
Strigopoidea
( New Zealand
New Zealand
parrots)Range of parrots, all species (red)Parrots, also known as psittacines /ˈsɪtəsaɪnz/,[1][2] are birds of the roughly 393 species in 92 genera that make up the order Psittaciformes, found in most tropical and subtropical regions. The order is subdivided into three superfamilies: the Psittacoidea
Psittacoidea
("true" parrots), the Cacatuoidea
Cacatuoidea
(cockatoos), and the Strigopoidea
Strigopoidea
(New Zealand parrots). Parrots have a generally pantropical distribution with several species inhabiting temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere, as well
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Beach Meadow
Beach Meadows are coastal meadows influenced by the presence of the nearby sea. Under this definition, the salinity of the air and wind is usually high and the meadows are often flooded during and after stormy weather. These conditions implies that the flora is dominated by salt-tolerant species. But that alone does not make a meadow. To be categorized as a meadow in the first place, the plantgrowth has to be low in height, and normally this can only be achieved from wear by general traffic or grazing of the landscape, either artificially or by livestock. Beach meadows are therefore usually thought of as cultural landscapes or biotopes, requiring some degree of intervention and not being able to sustain itself on its own
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