HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Vulnerability (computing)
In computer security, a vulnerability is a weakness which can be exploited by a Threat Actor, such as an attacker, to perform unauthorised actions within a computer system. Vulnerabilities are the intersection of three elements: a system susceptibility or flaw, attacker access to the flaw, and attacker capability to exploit the flaw.[1] To exploit a vulnerability, an attacker must have at least one applicable tool or technique that can connect to a system weakness. In this frame, vulnerability is also known as the attack surface. Vulnerability management is the cyclical practice of identifying, classifying, remediating, and mitigating vulnerabilities.[2] This practice generally refers to software vulnerabilities in computing systems. A security risk is often incorrectly classified as a vulnerability. The use of vulnerability with the same meaning of risk can lead to confusion
[...More...]

"Vulnerability (computing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hacker Ethic
Hacker ethic is a term for the moral values and philosophy that are common in hacker culture. Practitioners of the hacker ethic acknowledge that sharing information and data responsibly is beneficial and helpful.[1] Whilst the philosophy originated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
in the 1950s–1960s, the term hacker ethic is attributed to journalist Steven Levy
Steven Levy
as described in his 1984 book titled Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution. The key points within this ethic are access, freedom of information, and improvement to quality of life
[...More...]

"Hacker Ethic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Screen Scrape
Data
Data
scraping is a technique in which a computer program extracts data from human-readable output coming from another program.Contents1 Description 2 Technical variants2.1 Screen scraping 2.2 Web scraping 2.3 Report mining3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingDescription[edit] Normally, data transfer between programs is accomplished using data structures suited for automated processing by computers, not people. Such interchange formats and protocols are typically rigidly structured, well-documented, easily parsed, and keep ambiguity to a minimum. Very often, these transmissions are not human-readable at all.[1] Thus, the key element that distinguishes data scraping from regular parsing is that the output being scraped was intended for display to an end-user, rather than as input to another program, and is therefore usually neither documented nor structured for convenient parsing
[...More...]

"Screen Scrape" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Denial Of Service
In computing, a denial-of-service attack (DoS attack) is a cyber-attack in which the perpetrator seeks to make a machine or network resource unavailable to its intended users by temporarily or indefinitely disrupting services of a host connected to the Internet. Denial of service is typically accomplished by flooding the targeted machine or resource with superfluous requests in an attempt to overload systems and prevent some or all legitimate requests from being fulfilled.[1] In a distributed denial-of-service attack (DDoS attack), the incoming traffic flooding the victim originates from many different sources. This effectively makes it impossible to stop the attack simply by blocking a single source. A DoS or DDoS attack is analogous to a group of people crowding the entry door of a shop, making it hard for legitimate customers to enter, disrupting trade. Criminal perpetrators of DoS attacks often target sites or services hosted on high-profile web servers such as banks or credit card
[...More...]

"Denial Of Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Timeline Of Computer Security Hacker History
The timeline of computer security hacker history covers important and noteworthy events in the history of security hacking and cracking.Contents1 19001.1 19032 1930s2.1 1932 2.2 19393 1940s3.1 19434 1950s4.1 1955 4.2 19575 1960s5.1 1963 5.2 1965 5.3 19676 1970s6.1 1971 6.2 19797 1980s7.1 1980 7.2 1981 7.3 1983 7.4 1984 7.5 1985 7.6 1986 7.7 1987 7.8 1988 7.9 19898 1990s8.1 1990 8.2 1992 8.3 1993 8.4 1994 8.5 1995 8.6 1996 8.7 1997 8.8 1998 8.9 19999 2000s9.1 2000 9.2 2001 9.3 2002 9.4 2003 9.5 2004 9.6 2005 9.7 2006 9.8 2007 9.9 2008 9.10 200910 2010s10.1 2010 10.2 2011 10.3 2012 10.4 2013 10.5 2014 10.6 2015 10.7 2016 10.8 201711 See also 12 References 13 Further reading1900[edit] 1903[edit]Magician and inventor Nevil Maskelyne disrupts John Ambrose Fleming's public demonstration of Guglielmo Marconi's purportedly secur
[...More...]

"Timeline Of Computer Security Hacker History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Authentication
Authentication
Authentication
(from Greek: αὐθεντικός authentikos, "real, genuine", from αὐθέντης authentes, "author") is the act of confirming the truth of an attribute of a single piece of data claimed true by an entity. In contrast with identification, which refers to the act of stating or otherwise indicating a claim purportedly attesting to a person or thing's identity, authentication is the process of actually confirming that identity. It might involve confirming the identity of a person by validating their identity documents, verifying the authenticity of a website with a digital certificate,[1] determining the age of an artifact by carbon dating, or ensuring that a product is what its packaging and labeling claim to be
[...More...]

"Authentication" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Computer Crime
Cybercrime, or computer oriented crime, is crime that involves a computer and a network.[1] The computer may have been used in the commission of a crime, or it may be the target.[2] Cybercrimes can be defined as: "Offences that are committed against individuals or groups of individuals with a criminal motive to intentionally harm the reputation of the victim or cause physical or mental harm, or loss, to the victim directly or indirectly, using modern telecommunication networks such as Internet (networks including but not limited to Chat rooms, emails, notice boards and groups) and mobile phones (Bluetooth/SMS/MMS)".[3] Cybercrime
[...More...]

"Computer Crime" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eavesdropping
Eavesdropping
Eavesdropping
is secretly listening to the private conversation of others without their consent, as defined by Black's Law Dictionary.[1] The practice is commonly believed to be unethical.Contents1 Etymology 2 Techniques 3 Network attacks 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The verb eavesdrop is a back-formation from the noun eavesdropper ("a person who eavesdrops"), which was formed from the unrelated noun eavesdrop ("the dripping of water from the eaves of a house; the ground on which such water falls").[2] An eavesdropper was someone who stands at the eavesdrop (where the water drops, i.e., next to the house) so as to hear what is said within
[...More...]

"Eavesdropping" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

DEF CON
DEF CON
DEF CON
(also written as DEFCON, Defcon, or DC) is one of the world's largest hacker conventions, held annually in Las Vegas, Nevada, with the first DEF CON
DEF CON
taking place in June 1993
[...More...]

"DEF CON" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Logic Bomb
A logic bomb is a piece of code intentionally inserted into a software system that will set off a malicious function when specified conditions are met. For example, a programmer may hide a piece of code that starts deleting files (such as a salary database trigger), should they ever be terminated from the company. Software
Software
that is inherently malicious, such as viruses and worms, often contain logic bombs that execute a certain payload at a pre-defined time or when some other condition is met. This technique can be used by a virus or worm to gain momentum and spread before being noticed. Some viruses attack their host systems on specific dates, such as Friday the 13th
Friday the 13th
or April Fools' Day. Trojans that activate on certain dates are often called "time bombs". To be considered a logic bomb, the payload should be unwanted and unknown to the user of the software
[...More...]

"Logic Bomb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Backdoor (computing)
A backdoor is a method, often secret, of bypassing normal authentication or encryption in a computer system, a product, or an embedded device (e.g. a home router), or its embodiment, e.g. as part of a cryptosystem, an algorithm, a chipset, or a "homunculus computer"[1] (such as that as found in Intel's AMT technology). Backdoors are often used for securing remote access to a computer, or obtaining access to plaintext in cryptographic systems. A backdoor may take the form of a hidden part of a program one uses,[2] a separate program (e.g. Back Orifice may subvert the system through a rootkit), or code in the firmware of ones hardware[3] or parts of ones operating system such as Microsoft Windows.[4][5][6] Although normally surreptitiously installed, in some cases backdoors are deliberate and widely known
[...More...]

"Backdoor (computing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Internet Security
Internet
Internet
security is a branch of computer security specifically related to the Internet, often involving browser security but also network security on a more general level, as it applies to other applications or operating systems as a whole. Its objective is to establish rules and measures to use against attacks over the Internet.[1] The Internet
Internet
represents an insecure channel for exchanging information leading to a high risk of intrusion or fraud, such as phishing[2], online viruses, trojans, worms and more. Many methods are used to protect the transfer of data, including encryption and from-the-ground-up engineering
[...More...]

"Internet Security" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Computer Worm
A computer worm is a standalone malware computer program that replicates itself in order to spread to other computers.[1] Often, it uses a computer network to spread itself, relying on security failures on the target computer to access it. Worms almost always cause at least some harm to the network, even if only by consuming bandwidth, whereas viruses almost always corrupt or modify files on a targeted computer. Many worms that have been created are designed only to spread, and do not attempt to change the systems they pass through
[...More...]

"Computer Worm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Encryption
In cryptography, encryption is the process of encoding a message or information in such a way that only authorized parties can access it and those who are not authorized cannot. Encryption
Encryption
does not itself prevent interference, but denies the intelligible content to a would-be interceptor. In an encryption scheme, the intended information or message, referred to as plaintext, is encrypted using an encryption algorithm – a cipher – generating ciphertext that can be read only if decrypted. For technical reasons, an encryption scheme usually uses a pseudo-random encryption key generated by an algorithm. It is in principle possible to decrypt the message without possessing the key, but, for a well-designed encryption scheme, considerable computational resources and skills are required
[...More...]

"Encryption" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Security-focused Operating System
This is a list of operating systems with a sharp security focus. Here, "security-focused" means that the project is specifically focused on security
[...More...]

"Security-focused Operating System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Multi-factor Authentication
Multi-factor authentication
Multi-factor authentication
(MFA) is a method of confirming a user's claimed identity in which a user is granted access only after successfully presenting 2 or more pieces of evidence (or factors) to an authentication mechanism: knowledge (something they and only they know), possession (something they and only they have), and inherence (something they and only they are).[1][2] Two-factor authentication
Two-factor authentication
(also known as 2FA) is a type (subset) of multi-factor authentication
[...More...]

"Multi-factor Authentication" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.