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Vought F4U Corsair
The VOUGHT F4U CORSAIR is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II
World War II
and the Korean War
Korean War
. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought
Vought
's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear -built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster -built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured, in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53). The Corsair was designed as a carrier-based aircraft but its difficult carrier landing performance rendered it unsuitable for Navy use until the carrier landing issues were overcome by the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm
Fleet Air Arm

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Propeller (aircraft)
An AIRCRAFT PROPELLER, or AIRSCREW, converts rotary motion from an engine or other mechanical power source, to provide propulsive force . It comprises a rotating power-driven hub, to which are attached several radial airfoil -section blades such that the whole assembly rotates about a longitudinal axis. The blade pitch may be fixed, manually variable to a few set positions, or of the automatically-variable "constant-speed" type. The propeller attaches to the power source's driveshaft either directly or, especially on larger designs, through reduction gearing . Most early aircraft propellers were carved by hand from solid or laminated wood, while metal construction later became popular. More recently, composite materials are becoming increasingly used
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Chord (aircraft)
In aeronautics , CHORD refers to the imaginary straight line joining the leading and trailing edges of an aerofoil . The chord length is the distance between the trailing edge and the point on the leading edge where the chord intersects the leading edge . The point on the leading edge that is used to define the chord can be defined as either the surface point of minimum radius, or the surface point that will yield maximum chord length. The wing , horizontal stabilizer , vertical stabilizer and propeller of an aircraft are all based on aerofoil sections, and the term chord or chord length is also used to describe their width
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Parasitic Drag
PARASITIC DRAG is drag that results when an object is moved through a fluid medium. In the case of aerodynamic drag , the fluid medium is the atmosphere. Parasitic drag
Parasitic drag
is a combination of FORM DRAG, skin friction drag and INTERFERENCE DRAG. The other components of total drag, INDUCED DRAG, WAVE DRAG, and RAM DRAG, are separate types of drag, and are not components of parasitic drag. Parasitic drag
Parasitic drag
does not result from the induction of lift on the body, hence it is considered parasitic. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Form drag * 3 Profile drag * 4 Interference drag * 5 Skin friction * 6 Breakdown * 7 See also * 8 References DESCRIPTIONIn flight, induced drag results from the lift force that must be produced so that the craft can maintain level flight. Induced drag is greater at lower speeds where a high angle of attack is required
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Oleo Strut
An OLEO STRUT is a pneumatic air–oil hydraulic shock absorber used on the landing gear of most large aircraft and many smaller ones. This design cushions the impacts of landing and damps out vertical oscillations. It is undesirable for an airplane to bounce on landing—it could lead to a loss of control. The landing gear should not add to this tendency. A steel coil spring will store impact energy and then release it—the impact energy being the force of the airplane hitting the ground. An oleo strut absorbs this energy, reducing bounce. As the strut compresses, the spring rate increases dramatically, because the air is being compressed, while the viscosity of the oil dampens the rebound movement. The largest cargo airplanes in the world, like the Antonov An-124 Ruslan , use oleo struts to allow for rough-field landing capacity with a payload of up to 150 tons. This design also cushions the airframe from the impacts of taxiing
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Hamilton Standard
HAMILTON STANDARD (Now UTC Aerospace Systems a.k.a. UTAS ), an aircraft propeller parts supplier, was formed in 1929 when United Aircraft
Aircraft
and Transport Corporation consolidated Hamilton Aero Manufacturing and Standard Steel Propeller into the Hamilton Standard Propeller Corporation. Other members of the corporation included Boeing
Boeing
, United Airlines
United Airlines
, Sikorsky , and Pratt "> Hamilton Standard propeller used in Douglas DC-6
Douglas DC-6
Hamilton Standard propeller on Douglas DC-3
Douglas DC-3
of American Airlines
American Airlines
Standard Steel Propeller had been formed in 1918 in Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
, Pennsylvania and Hamilton Aero Manufacturing had been formed in 1920 in Milwaukee
Milwaukee
, Wisconsin by Thomas F. Hamilton
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Aircraft Carrier
An AIRCRAFT CARRIER is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase , equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft . Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations . Aircraft carriers are expensive to build and are critical assets. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighter planes , strike aircraft , helicopters , and other types of aircraft. There is no single definition of an "aircraft carrier," and modern navies use several variants of the type. These variants are sometimes categorized as sub-types of aircraft carriers, and sometimes as distinct types of naval aviation -capable ships
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Carrier-based Aircraft
CARRIER-BASED AIRCRAFT, sometimes known as CARRIER-CAPABLE AIRCRAFT or CARRIER-BORNE AIRCRAFT, are naval aircraft designed for operations from aircraft carriers . They must be able to launch in a short distance and be sturdy enough to withstand the abrupt forces of launching from and recovering on a pitching deck. In addition, their wings are generally able to fold up, easing operations in tight quarters. Such aircraft are designed for many purposes including air-to-air combat , surface attack , anti-submarine warfare (ASW) , search and rescue (SAR) , transport (COD) , weather observation , reconnaissance and airborne early warning and control (AEW"> Grumman Martlet lining up the flight deck of HMS Formidable . The first carrier landing and take-off of a jet aircraft, by a De Havilland Vampire in 1945
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USAAC
The UNITED STATES ARMY AIR CORPS (USAAC) was the military aviation arm of the United States
United States
of America between 1926 and 1941. After World War I , as early aviation became an increasingly important part of modern warfare, a philosophical rift developed between more traditional ground-based army personnel and those who felt that aircraft were being underutilized and that air operations were being stifled for political reasons unrelated to their effectiveness. The USAAC was renamed from the earlier United States
United States
Army Air Service on 2 July 1926, and was part of the larger United States
United States
Army . The Air Corps became the United States
United States
Army Air Forces (USAAF) on 20 June 1941, giving it greater autonomy from the Army's middle-level command structure
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Synchronization Gear
A SYNCHRONIZATION GEAR, or a GUN SYNCHRONIZER, sometimes rather less accurately referred to as an INTERRUPTER, is attached to the armament of a single-engined tractor -type aircraft so it can fire through the arc of its spinning propeller without bullets striking the blades. The idea presupposes a fixed armament directed by aiming the aircraft in which it is fitted at the target, rather than aiming the gun independently. There are many practical problems, mostly arising from the inherently imprecise nature of an automatic gun's firing, the great (and varying) velocity of the blades of a spinning propeller, and the very high speed at which any gear synchronizing the two has to operate
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Curtiss P-36 Hawk
The CURTISS P-36 HAWK, also known as the CURTISS HAWK MODEL 75, was an American-designed and built fighter aircraft of the 1930s and 40s. A contemporary of both the Hawker Hurricane
Hawker Hurricane
and Messerschmitt Bf 109
Messerschmitt Bf 109
, it was one of the first of a new generation of combat aircraft—a sleek monoplane design making extensive use of metal in its construction and powered by a powerful radial engine . Perhaps best known as the predecessor of the Curtiss P-40 Warhawk , the P-36 saw little combat with the United States Army Air Forces during World War II
World War II
. It was nevertheless the fighter used most extensively and successfully by the French Armee de l\'air during the Battle of France
Battle of France

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Supercharger
A SUPERCHARGER is an air compressor that increases the pressure or density of air supplied to an internal combustion engine . This gives each intake cycle of the engine more oxygen, letting it burn more fuel and do more work , thus increasing power. Power for the supercharger can be provided mechanically by means of a belt, gear, shaft, or chain connected to the engine's crankshaft . When power is provided by a turbine powered by exhaust gas , a supercharger is known as a turbosupercharger – typically referred to simply as a turbocharger or just turbo. Common usage restricts the term supercharger to mechanically driven units
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Rudder
A RUDDER is a primary control surface used to steer a ship , boat , submarine , hovercraft , aircraft , or other conveyance that moves through a fluid medium (generally air or water). On an aircraft the rudder is used primarily to counter adverse yaw and p-factor and is not the primary control used to turn the airplane. A rudder operates by redirecting the fluid past the hull (watercraft) or fuselage , thus imparting a turning or yawing motion to the craft. In basic form, a rudder is a flat plane or sheet of material attached with hinges to the craft's stern , tail, or after end. Often rudders are shaped so as to minimize hydrodynamic or aerodynamic drag . On simple watercraft , a tiller —essentially, a stick or pole acting as a lever arm—may be attached to the top of the rudder to allow it to be turned by a helmsman . In larger vessels, cables, pushrods , or hydraulics may be used to link rudders to steering wheels
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Flap (aircraft)
FLAPS are a type of high-lift device used to increase the lift of an aircraft wing at a given airspeed . Flaps are usually mounted on the wing trailing edges of a fixed-wing aircraft . Flaps are used to lower the minimum speed at which the aircraft can be safely flown, and to increase the angle of descent for landing. Flaps also cause an increase in drag , so they are retracted when not needed. Extending the wing flaps increases the camber or curvature of the wing, raising the maximum lift coefficient or the upper limit to the lift a wing can generate. This allows the aircraft to generate the required lift at a lower speed, reducing the stalling speed of the aircraft, and therefore also the minimum speed at which the aircraft will safely maintain flight. The increase in camber also increases the wing drag , which can be beneficial during approach and landing, because it slows the aircraft
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Tailhook
A TAILHOOK, ARRESTING HOOK, or ARRESTER HOOK is a device attached to the empennage (rear) of some military fixed-wing aircraft . The hook is used to achieve rapid deceleration during routine landings aboard aircraft carrier flight decks at sea, or during emergency landings or aborted takeoffs at properly equipped airports. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Description * 3 Arresting gear * 4 Use * 5 Testing * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links HISTORY Tailhook
Tailhook
on an E-1B Tracer On January 18, 1911, Eugene Ely landed his Curtiss pusher airplane on a platform on the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania anchored in San Francisco Bay . Ely flew from the Tanforan airfield in San Bruno, California and landed on the Pennsylvania, which was the first successful shipboard landing of an aircraft
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Stall (flight)
In fluid dynamics , a STALL is a reduction in the lift coefficient generated by a foil as angle of attack increases. This occurs when the critical angle of attack of the foil is exceeded. The critical angle of attack is typically about 15 degrees, but it may vary significantly depending on the fluid, foil, and Reynolds number . Stalls in fixed-wing flight are often experienced as a sudden reduction in lift as the pilot increases the wing's angle of attack and exceeds its critical angle of attack (which may be due to slowing down below stall speed in level flight). A stall does not mean that the engine(s) have stopped working, or that the aircraft has stopped moving — the effect is the same even in an unpowered glider aircraft . Vectored thrust in manned and unmanned aircraft is used to surpass the stall limit, thereby giving rise to post-stall technology
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