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Vought F4U Corsair
The Vought
Vought
F4U Corsair is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II
World War II
and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured,[2] in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).[3][4][5] The Corsair was designed as a carrier-based aircraft, but it came to and retained prominence in its area of greatest deployment: land based use by the U.S. Marines.[6] Due to logistics issues and initial problems with carrier landings, the role of the dominant U.S
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Carrier-based Aircraft
Carrier-based aircraft, sometimes known as carrier-capable aircraft or carrier-borne aircraft, are naval aircraft designed for operations from aircraft carriers. They must be able to launch in a short distance and be sturdy enough to withstand the abrupt forces of launching from and recovering on a pitching deck
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Curtiss P-36 Hawk
The Curtiss P-36 Hawk, also known as the Curtiss Hawk Model 75, is an American-designed and built fighter aircraft of the 1930s and 40s. A contemporary of both the Hawker Hurricane
Hawker Hurricane
and Messerschmitt Bf 109, it was one of the first of a new generation of combat aircraft—a sleek monoplane design making extensive use of metal in its construction and powered by a powerful radial engine. Perhaps best known as the predecessor of the Curtiss P-40
P-40
Warhawk, the P-36 saw little combat with the United States Army Air Forces
United States Army Air Forces
during World War II. It was nevertheless the fighter used most extensively and successfully by the French Armee de l'air during the Battle of France. The P-36 was also ordered by the governments of the Netherlands and Norway, but did not arrive in time to see action before both were occupied by Nazi Germany
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Synchronization Gear
A synchronization gear, or a gun synchronizer, sometimes rather less accurately referred to as an interrupter, is attached to the armament of a single-engined tractor-type aircraft so it can fire through the arc of its spinning propeller without bullets striking the blades
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Aircraft Carrier
An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft.[1] Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighter planes, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. Whilst heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets
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Hamilton Standard
Hamilton Standard
Hamilton Standard
(Now UTC Aerospace Systems
UTC Aerospace Systems
a.k.a. UTAS[1] ), an aircraft propeller parts supplier, was formed in 1929 when United Aircraft
Aircraft
and Transport Corporation consolidated Hamilton Aero Manufacturing and Standard Steel Propeller into the Hamilton Standard Propeller Corporation. Other members of the corporation included Boeing, United Airlines, Sikorsky, and Pratt & Whitney
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Propeller (aircraft)
An aircraft propeller, or airscrew,[1] converts rotary motion from an engine or other power source, into a swirling slipstream which pushes the propeller forwards or backwards
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Chord (aircraft)
In aeronautics, chord refers to the imaginary straight line joining the leading and trailing edges of an aerofoil. The chord length is the distance between the trailing edge and the point on the leading edge where the chord intersects the leading edge.[1][2] The point on the leading edge that is used to define the chord can be defined as either the surface point of minimum radius,[2] or the surface point that will yield maximum chord length[citation needed]. The wing, horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer and propeller of an aircraft are all based on aerofoil sections, and the term chord or chord length is also used to describe their width
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Parasitic Drag
Parasitic drag
Parasitic drag
is drag that results when an object is moved through a fluid medium. In the case of aerodynamic drag, the fluid medium is the atmosphere. Parasitic drag
Parasitic drag
is a combination of form drag, skin friction drag and interference drag. The other components of total drag, induced drag, wave drag, and ram drag (see ram pressure), are separate types of drag, and are not components of parasitic drag. Parasitic drag
Parasitic drag
does not result from the induction of lift on the body, hence it is considered parasitic.Contents1 Description 2 Form drag 3 Profile drag 4 Interference drag 5 Skin friction 6 See also 7 ReferencesDescription[edit] In flight, induced drag results from the lift force that must be produced so that the craft can maintain level flight. Induced drag
Induced drag
is greater at lower speeds where a high angle of attack is required
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Oleo Strut
An oleo strut is a pneumatic air–oil hydraulic shock absorber used on the landing gear of most large aircraft and many smaller ones.[1] This design cushions the impacts of landing and damps out vertical oscillations. It is undesirable for an airplane to bounce on landing—it could lead to a loss of control.[2] The landing gear should not add to this tendency. A steel coil spring stores impact energy from landing and then releases it. An oleo strut absorbs this energy, reducing bounce.[3] As the strut compresses, the spring rate increases dramatically, because the air is being compressed, while the viscosity of the oil dampens the rebound movement.[4][5] The largest cargo airplanes in the world, such as the Antonov An-124 Ruslan, use oleo struts to allow for rough-field landing capacity with a payload of up to 150 tons
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Supercharger
A supercharger is an air compressor that increases the pressure or density of air supplied to an internal combustion engine
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Stratford, Connecticut
Stratford is a town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, United States. It is situated on Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
along Connecticut's "Gold Coast" at the mouth of the Housatonic River. Stratford is in the Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk Metropolitan Statistical Area. It was founded by Puritans
Puritans
in 1639. The population was 51,384 as of the 2010 census.[1] It has a historical legacy in aviation, the military, and theater
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Aluminum
Aluminium
Aluminium
or aluminum is a chemical element with symbol Al and atomic number 13. It is a silvery-white, soft, nonmagnetic and ductile metal in the boron group. By mass, aluminium makes up about 8% of the Earth's crust; it is the third most abundant element after oxygen and silicon and the most abundant metal in the crust, though it is less common in the mantle below. The chief ore of aluminium is bauxite. Aluminium
Aluminium
metal is so chemically reactive that native specimens are rare and limited to extreme reducing environments. Instead, it is found combined in over 270 different minerals.[5] Aluminium
Aluminium
is remarkable for its low density and its ability to resist corrosion through the phenomenon of passivation
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Spot Welding
Resistance spot welding (RSW)[1] is a process in which contacting metal surface points are joined by the heat obtained from resistance to electric current. It is a subset of electric resistance welding. Work-pieces are held together under pressure exerted by electrodes. Typically the sheets are in the 0.5 to 3 mm (0.020 to 0.118 in) thickness range. The process uses two shaped copper alloy electrodes to concentrate welding current into a small "spot" and to simultaneously clamp the sheets together. Forcing a large current through the spot will melt the metal and form the weld
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Spar (aviation)
In a fixed-wing aircraft, the spar is often the main structural member of the wing, running spanwise at right angles (or thereabouts depending on wing sweep) to the fuselage. The spar carries flight loads and the weight of the wings while on the ground. Other structural and forming members such as ribs may be attached to the spar or spars, with stressed skin construction also sharing the loads where it is used. There may be more than one spar in a wing or none at all
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Aileron
An aileron (French for "little wing" or "fin") is a hinged flight control surface usually forming part of the trailing edge of each wing of a fixed-wing aircraft. Ailerons are used in pairs to control the aircraft in roll (or movement around the aircraft's longitudinal axis), which normally results in a change in flight path due to the tilting of the lift vector. Movement around this axis is called 'rolling' or 'banking'. The aileron was first patented by the British scientist and inventor Matthew Piers Watt Boulton in 1868, based on his 1864 paper On Aërial Locomotion. Even though there was extensive prior art in the 19th century for the aileron and its functional analog, wing warping, in 1906 the United States granted an expansive patent to the Wright Brothers of Dayton, Ohio, for the invention of a system of aerodynamic control that manipulated an airplane's control surfaces
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