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Virtual Shtetl
The Virtual Shtetl
Shtetl
(Polish: Wirtualny Sztetl) is a bilingual Polish-English portal of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews
Museum of the History of Polish Jews
in Warsaw, devoted to the Jewish history of Poland.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Virtual Shtetl
Shtetl
website was officially launched on June 16, 2009. The portal lists over 1,240 towns with maps, statistics and picture galleries. In the future, it will also include an interactive system by which Internet users will interact with each other. It creates a link between Polish-Jewish history and the contemporary, multi-cultural world. The Virtual Shtetl
Shtetl
is an extension of the real Museum scheduled to open in 2011 on the site of the Warsaw
Warsaw
ghetto. Its main objective is to provide a unique social forum for everyone interested in Polish-Jewish life
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Polish Language
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland
Poland
and is the native language of the Poles. It belongs to the Lechitic subgroup of the West Slavic languages.[8] Polish is the official language of Poland, but it is also used throughout the world by Polish minorities in other countries. There are over 55 million Polish language
Polish language
speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union. Its written standard is the Polish alphabet, which has 9 additions to the letters of the basic Latin script
Latin script
(ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż)
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Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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List Of Active Synagogues In Poland
Before the Nazi German invasion of Poland in 1939, almost every Polish town had a synagogue or a Jewish house of prayer of some kind. The 1939 statistics recorded the total of 1,415 Jewish communities in the country just before the outbreak of war, each composed of at least 100 members (Gruber, 1995). Every one of them owned at least one synagogue and a Jewish cemetery nearby. Approximately 9.8% of all believers in Poland were Jewish (according to 1931 census).[1] The list of actives synagogues in Poland cannot possibly include the hundreds of synagogue buildings which still stand today in about 250 cities and towns across the country – seventy years after the Holocaust in Poland which claimed the lives of over 90% of Polish Jewry
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Włodawa Synagogue
The Włodawa
Włodawa
Synagogue (Wlodowa Synagogue) in Włodawa, Poland
Poland
is an architectural complex consisting of two historic synagogues and a Jewish administrative building, now preserved as a museum
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Jewish Historical Institute
The Jewish Historical Institute
Jewish Historical Institute
(Polish: Żydowski Instytut Historyczny or ŻIH) also known as the Emanuel Ringelblum
Emanuel Ringelblum
Jewish Historical Institute, is a research foundation in Warsaw, Poland, primarily dealing with the history of Jews in Poland. History[edit] The Jewish Historical Institute
Jewish Historical Institute
was created in 1947 as a continuation of the Central Jewish Historical Commission, founded in 1944. The Jewish Historical Institute
Jewish Historical Institute
Association is the corporate body responsible for the building and the Institute’s holdings. The Institute falls under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage. In 2009 it was named after Emanuel Ringelblum. The institute is a repository of documentary materials relating to the Jewish historical presence in Poland
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Adam Mickiewicz Institute
The Adam Mickiewicz
Adam Mickiewicz
Institute (Polish: Instytut Adama Mickiewicza) is a government-sponsored organization funded by Poland's Ministry of Culture and National Heritage, and headquartered at ulica Mokotowska 25 (the Sugar Palace) in Warsaw. Named after Polish national poet Adam Mickiewicz, its goal is to promote the
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Former Eastern Territories Of Germany
The former eastern territories of Germany
Germany
(German: Ehemalige deutsche Ostgebiete) are those provinces or regions east of the current eastern border of Germany
Germany
(the Oder–Neisse line) which were lost by Germany after World War I
World War I
and then World War II. The territories lost following World War I
World War I
include most of the Province of Posen and West Prussia
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (
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Yiddish
Yiddish
Yiddish
(ייִדיש, יידיש or אידיש, yidish/idish, lit. "Jewish", pronounced [ˈjɪdɪʃ] [ˈɪdɪʃ]; in older sources ייִדיש-טײַטש Yidish-Taitsh, lit. Judaeo-German)[3] is the historical language of the Ashkenazi Jews. It originated during the 9th century[4] in Central Europe, providing the nascent Ashkenazi community with a High German-based vernacular fused with elements taken from Hebrew and Aramaic as well as from Slavic languages
Slavic languages
and traces of Romance languages.[5][6] Yiddish
Yiddish
is written with a fully vocalized version of the Hebrew alphabet. The earliest surviving references date from the 12th century and call the language לשון־אַשכּנז‎ (loshn-ashknaz, "language of Ashkenaz") or טײַטש‎ (taytsh), a variant of tiutsch, the contemporary name for Middle High German
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Jew
Enlarged population (includes full or partial Jewish ancestry): 20.7 million[1] (2018, est.)Regions with significant populations Israel6,558,100–6,958,300[1] United States5,700,000–10,000,000[1] France453,000–600,000[1] Canada390,500–550,000[1] United Kingdom290,000–370,000[1] Argentina180,300–330,000[1] Russia172,000–440,000[1] Germany116,000–225,000[1] Australia113,400–140,000[1] Brazil93,200–150,000[1] South Africa69,000–80,000[1] Ukraine50,000–140,000[1] Hungary47,400–100,000[1] Mexico40,000–50,000[1] Netherlands29,800–52,000[1] Belgium29,200–40,000[1] Italy27,500–41,000[1]  Switzerland18,600–25,000[1] Chile18,300–26,000[1] Uruguay16,700–25,000[1] Turkey15,000–
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Warsaw
Warsaw
Warsaw
(/ˈwɔːrsɔː/ WOR-saw; Polish: Warszawa [varˈʂava] (listen); see also other names) is the capital and largest city of Poland. The metropolis stands on the Vistula
Vistula
River in east-central Poland
Poland
and its population is officially estimated at 1.78 million residents within a greater metropolitan area of 3.1 million residents,[5] which makes Warsaw
Warsaw
the 8th most-populous capital city in the European Union. The city limits cover 516.9 square kilometres (199.6 sq mi), while the metropolitan area covers 6,100.43 square kilometres (2,355.39 sq mi).[6] Warsaw
Warsaw
is an alpha global city,[7] a major international tourist destination, and a significant cultural, political and economic hub
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Shtetl
Shtetlekh (Yiddish: שטעטל‎, shtetl (singular), שטעטלעך, shtetlekh (plural))[1] were small towns with large Jewish populations, which existed in Central and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
before the Holocaust. Shtetlekh were mainly found in the areas that constituted the 19th century Pale of Settlement
Pale of Settlement
in the Russian Empire, the Congress Kingdom of Poland, Galicia (Ukraine) and Romania
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History Of Polish Jews
The history of the Jews
Jews
in Poland
Poland
dates back over 1,000 years. For centuries, Poland
Poland
was home to the largest and most significant Jewish community in the world. Poland
Poland
was the centre of Jewish
Jewish
culture, thanks to a long period of statutory religious tolerance and social autonomy. This ended with the Partitions of Poland
Poland
which began in 1772, in particular, with the discrimination and persecution of Jews in the Russian Empire. During World War II
World War II
there was a nearly complete genocidal destruction of the Polish Jewish
Jewish
community by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, during the 1939–1945 German occupation of Poland
Poland
and the ensuing Holocaust
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History Of The Polish Jews
The history of the Jews
Jews
in Poland
Poland
dates back over 1,000 years. For centuries, Poland
Poland
was home to the largest and most significant Jewish community in the world. Poland
Poland
was the centre of Jewish
Jewish
culture, thanks to a long period of statutory religious tolerance and social autonomy. This ended with the Partitions of Poland
Poland
which began in 1772, in particular, with the discrimination and persecution of Jews in the Russian Empire. During World War II
World War II
there was a nearly complete genocidal destruction of the Polish Jewish
Jewish
community by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, during the 1939–1945 German occupation of Poland
Poland
and the ensuing Holocaust
[...More...]