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Virginals
The virginals[a] or virginal is a keyboard instrument of the harpsichord family. It was popular in Europe during the late Renaissance and early baroque periods.Contents1 Description 2 Mechanism 3 Etymology 4 History 5 Types5.1 Spinet
Spinet
virginals 5.2 Muselars 5.3 Ottavini 5.4 Double virginals6 Compass and pitch 7 Decoration 8 Composers and collections of works 9 Further reading 10 Notes 11 References 12 External linksDescription[edit] A virginal is a smaller and simpler rectangular form of the harpsichord with only one string per note running more or less parallel to the keyboard on the long side of the case. Many, if not most, of the instruments were constructed without legs, and would be placed on a table for playing. Later models were built with their own stands. Mechanism[edit] The mechanism of the virginals is identical to the harpsichord's, in that its wire strings are plucked by plectra mounted in jacks
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Marble
Marble
Marble
is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble
Marble
may be foliated. In geology the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone.[1] Marble
Marble
is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical origins 3 Types 4 Uses4.1 Sculpture 4.2 Construction
Construction
marble5 Production5.1 Occupational safety5.1.1 United States6 Microbial degradation 7 Cultural associations 8 Artificial marble 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEtymologyCarlo Franzoni's sculptural marble chariot clock depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. Marble
Marble
wall of Ruskeala
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Cypress
Cypress
Cypress
is a common name for various coniferous trees or shrubs of northern temperate regions that belong to the family Cupressaceae
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Psaltery
A psaltery (or sawtry [archaic]) is a stringed instrument of the zither family.Contents1 Ancient harp psaltery 2 Ancient European zither psaltery 3 Medieval psaltery 4 Modern psaltery 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksAncient harp psaltery[edit] The psaltery of Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
(epigonion) is a harp-like instrument. The word psaltery derives from the Ancient Greek
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Interval (music)
In music theory, an interval is the difference between two pitches.[1] An interval may be described as horizontal, linear, or melodic if it refers to successively sounding tones, such as two adjacent pitches in a melody, and vertical or harmonic if it pertains to simultaneously sounding tones, such as in a chord.[2][3] In Western music, intervals are most commonly differences between notes of a diatonic scale. The smallest of these intervals is a semitone. Intervals smaller than a semitone are called microtones. They can be formed using the notes of various kinds of non-diatonic scales. Some of the very smallest ones are called commas, and describe small discrepancies, observed in some tuning systems, between enharmonically equivalent notes such as C♯ and D♭. Intervals can be arbitrarily small, and even imperceptible to the human ear. In physical terms, an interval is the ratio between two sonic frequencies. For example, any two notes an octave apart have a frequency ratio of 2:1
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Oxford English Dictionary
The Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University
Oxford University
Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.[2][3] The second edition came to 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was not until 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society
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Pitch (music)
Pitch is a perceptual property of sounds that allows their ordering on a frequency-related scale,[1] or more commonly, pitch is the quality that makes it possible to judge sounds as "higher" and "lower" in the sense associated with musical melodies.[2] Pitch can be determined only in sounds that have a frequency that is clear and stable enough to distinguish from noise.[3] Pitch is a major auditory attribute of musical tones, along with duration, loudness, and timbre.[4] Pitch may be quantified as a frequency, but pitch is not a purely objective physical property; it is a subjective psychoacoustical attribute of sound
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Flanders
Flanders
Flanders
(Dutch: Vlaanderen [ˈvlaːndərə(n)] ( listen), French: Flandre [flɑ̃dʁ], German: Flandern, [flɑndɛɹn]) is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium, although there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history. It is one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. The demonym associated with Flanders
Flanders
is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish
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Dutch Language
 Aruba  Belgium  Curaçao  Netherlands  Sint Maarten  Suriname Benelux European Union South American Union CaricomRegulated by Nederlandse Taalunie (Dutch Language Union)Language codesISO 639-1 nlISO 639-2 dut (B) nld (T)ISO 639-3 nld Dutch/FlemishGlottolog mode1257[4]Linguasphere 52-ACB-aDutch-speaking world (included are areas of daughter-language Afrikaans)Distribution of the Dutch language
Dutch language
and its dialects in Western EuropeThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Bridge (instrument)
A bridge is a device that supports the strings on a stringed musical instrument and transmits the vibration of those strings to another structural component of the instrument—typically a soundboard, such as the top of a guitar or violin—which transfers the sound to the surrounding air. Depending on the instrument, the bridge may be made of carved wood (violin family instruments, acoustic guitars and some jazz guitars), metal (electric guitars such as the Fender Telecaster) or other materials
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Hexagonal
In geometry, a hexagon (from Greek ἕξ hex, "six" and γωνία, gonía, "corner, angle") is a six-sided polygon or 6-gon
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William Byrd
William Byrd
William Byrd
(/bɜːrd/; birth date variously given as c.1539/40 or 1543 – 4 July 1623), was an English composer of the Renaissance. He wrote in many of the forms current in England at the time, including various types of sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard (the so-called Virginalist school), and consort music
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Rectangular
In Euclidean plane geometry, a rectangle is a quadrilateral with four right angles. It can also be defined as an equiangular quadrilateral, since equiangular means that all of its angles are equal (360°/4 = 90°). It can also be defined as a parallelogram containing a right angle. A rectangle with four sides of equal length is a square. The term oblong is occasionally used to refer to a non-square rectangle.[1][2][3] A rectangle with vertices ABCD would be denoted as  ABCD. The word rectangle comes from the Latin
Latin
rectangulus, which is a combination of rectus (as an adjective, right, proper) and angulus (angle). A crossed rectangle is a crossed (self-intersecting) quadrilateral which consists of two opposite sides of a rectangle along with the two diagonals.[4] It is a special case of an antiparallelogram, and its angles are not right angles
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Vault (architecture)
Vault (French voûte, from Italian volta) is an architectural term for an arched form used to provide a space with a ceiling or roof.[1] The parts of a vault exert lateral thrust that requires a counter resistance. When vaults are built underground, the ground gives all the resistance required. However, when the vault is built above ground, various replacements are employed to supply the needed resistance. An example is the thicker walls used in the case of barrel or continuous vaults. Buttresses are used to supply resistance when intersecting vaults are employed. The simplest kind of vault is the barrel vault (also called a wagon or tunnel vault), which is generally semicircular in shape. The barrel vault is a continuous arch, the length being greater than its diameter
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School (discipline)
A school of thought (or intellectual tradition) is a collection or group of people who share common characteristics of opinion or outlook of a philosophy, discipline, belief, social movement, economics, cultural movement, or art movement. Schools are often characterized by their currency, and thus classified into "new" and "old" schools. There is a convention, in political and philosophical fields of thought, to have "modern" and "classical" schools of thought. An example is the modern and classical liberals. This dichotomy is often a component of paradigm shift. However, it is rarely the case that there are only two schools in any given field. Schools are often named after their founders such as the "Rinzai school" of Zen, named after Linji Yixuan; and the Asharite
Asharite
school of early Muslim philosophy, named after Abu l'Hasan al-Ashari
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National Gallery, London
5,229,192 (2017)[1]Ranked 3rd nationally[1]Director Gabriele FinaldiPublic transit access Charing Cross Charing Cross Detailed information belowWebsite www.nationalgallery.org.ukThe National Gallery
National Gallery
is an art museum in Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
in the City of Westminster, in Central London. Founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900.[a] The Gallery is an exempt charity, and a non-departmental public body of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.[2] Its collection belongs to the government on behalf of the British public, and entry to the main collection is free of charge
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