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Virginals
The VIRGINALS or VIRGINAL is a keyboard instrument of the harpsichord family. It was popular in Europe during the late Renaissance and early baroque periods. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Mechanism * 3 Etymology * 4 History * 5 Types * 5.1 Spinet virginals * 5.2 Muselars * 5.3 Ottavini * 5.4 Double virginals * 6 Compass and pitch * 7 Decoration * 8 Composers and collections of works * 9 Further reading * 10 Notes * 11 References * 12 External links DESCRIPTIONA virginal is a smaller and simpler rectangular form of the harpsichord with only one string per note running more or less parallel to the keyboard on the long side of the case. Many, if not most, of the instruments were constructed without legs, and would be placed on a table for playing. Later models were built with their own stands
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Flanders
FLANDERS (Dutch : Vlaanderen ( listen ), French : Flandre , German : Flandern) is the Dutch -speaking northern portion of Belgium
Belgium
, although there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history. It is one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium
Belgium
. The demonym associated with Flanders
Flanders
is Fleming , while the corresponding adjective is Flemish
Flemish
. The official capital of Flanders
Flanders
is Brussels
Brussels
, although Brussels
Brussels
itself has an independent regional government, and the government of Flanders
Flanders
only oversees some cultural aspects of Brussels
Brussels
life
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Dutch Language
DUTCH ( Nederlands (help ·info )) is a West Germanic language that is spoken by around 23 million people as a first language—including most of the population of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and about sixty percent of Belgium
Belgium
—and by another 5 million as a second language. It is the third most widely spoken Germanic language , after English and German. Outside of the Low Countries , it is the native language of the majority of the population of Suriname , and also holds official status in Aruba , Curaçao
Curaçao
and Sint Maarten
Sint Maarten
, which are constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Netherlands

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Bridge (instrument)
A BRIDGE is a device that supports the strings on a stringed musical instrument and transmits the vibration of those strings to another structural component of the instrument—typically a soundboard , such as the top of a guitar or violin—which transfers the sound to the surrounding air. CONTENTS * 1 Explanation * 2 Positioning * 3 Construction * 4 Bridge pin * 5 Operation * 6 Electric guitar bridges * 6.1 Vibrato
Vibrato
bridges * 6.1.1 Non-Locking Tremolo/ Vibrato
Vibrato
systems * 6.1.2 Locking Tremolo/ Vibrato
Vibrato
systems * 6.2 Non-Tremolo/ Vibrato
Vibrato
bridges * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links EXPLANATIONMost stringed instruments produce sound through the application of energy to the strings, which sets them into vibratory motion
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Pitch (music)
PITCH is a perceptual property of sounds that allows their ordering on a frequency -related scale , or more commonly, pitch is the quality that makes it possible to judge sounds as "higher" and "lower" in the sense associated with musical melodies . Pitch can be determined only in sounds that have a frequency that is clear and stable enough to distinguish from noise . Pitch is a major auditory attribute of musical tones , along with duration , loudness , and timbre . Pitch may be quantified as a frequency , but pitch is not a purely objective physical property; it is a subjective psychoacoustical attribute of sound. Historically, the study of pitch and pitch perception has been a central problem in psychoacoustics, and has been instrumental in forming and testing theories of sound representation, processing, and perception in the auditory system
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Oxford English Dictionary
The OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY (OED) is a descriptive dictionary of the English language
English language
, published by the Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press
. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world. The second edition came to 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was not until 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society
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Middle Ages
In the history of Europe , the MIDDLE AGES or MEDIEVAL PERIOD lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery . The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity , the medieval period, and the modern period . The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early , High , and Late Middle Ages . Population decline
Population decline
, counterurbanisation , invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity
Late Antiquity
, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period , including various Germanic peoples , formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
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Psaltery
A PSALTERY (or SAWTRY (archaic)) is a stringed instrument of the zither family. CONTENTS * 1 Ancient harp psaltery * 2 Ancient European zither psaltery * 3 Medieval psaltery * 4 Modern psaltery * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links ANCIENT HARP PSALTERYThe psaltery of Ancient Greece (epigonion ) is a harp-like instrument. The word psaltery derives from the Ancient Greek ψαλτήριον (psaltḗrion), "stringed instrument, psaltery, harp" and that from the verb ψάλλω (psállō), "to touch sharply, to pluck, pull, twitch" and in the case of the strings of musical instruments, "to play a stringed instrument with the fingers, and not with the plectrum ." The psaltery was originally made from wood, and relied on natural acoustics for sound production
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Interval (music)
In music theory , an INTERVAL is the difference between two pitches . An interval may be described as HORIZONTAL, LINEAR, or MELODIC if it refers to successively sounding tones, such as two adjacent pitches in a melody, and VERTICAL or HARMONIC if it pertains to simultaneously sounding tones, such as in a chord . In Western music, intervals are most commonly differences between notes of a diatonic scale . The smallest of these intervals is a semitone . Intervals smaller than a semitone are called microtones . They can be formed using the notes of various kinds of non-diatonic scales. Some of the very smallest ones are called commas , and describe small discrepancies, observed in some tuning systems , between enharmonically equivalent notes such as C♯ and D♭. Intervals can be arbitrarily small, and even imperceptible to the human ear. In physical terms, an interval is the ratio between two sonic frequencies
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Cypress
CYPRESS is a conifer tree or shrub of northern temperate regions that belongs to the family Cupressaceae
Cupressaceae
. The word cypress is derived from Old French
Old French
cipres, which was imported from Latin
Latin
cypressus, the latinisation of the Greek κυπάρισσος (kyparissos )
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Hexagonal
In geometry , a HEXAGON (from Greek ἕξ hex, "six" and γωνία, gonía, "corner, angle") is a six sided polygon or 6-gon. The total of the internal angles of any hexagon is 720°
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Sound Board (music)
A SOUND BOARD, or SOUNDBOARD, is the surface of a string instrument that the strings vibrate against, usually via some sort of bridge . Pianos, guitars, banjos, and many other stringed instruments incorporate soundboards. The resonant properties of the sound board and the interior of the instrument greatly increase the loudness of the vibrating strings. The sound board operates by the principle of forced vibration . The string gently vibrates the board, and despite their differences in size and composition, makes the board vibrate at exactly the same frequency. This produces the same sound as the string alone, differing only in timbre . The string would produce the same amount of energy without the board present, but the greater surface area of the sound board moves a greater volume of air, which produces a louder sound. Sound boards are traditionally made of wood (see tonewood ), though other materials are used, such as skin or plastic on instruments in the banjo family
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Chord (music)
A CHORD, in music , is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of two or more (usually three or more) notes (also called "pitches") that are heard as if sounding simultaneously . (For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords, or sequences of chord tones , may also be considered as chords.) Chords and sequences of chords are frequently used in modern West African and Oceanic music, Western classical music, and Western popular music ; yet, they are absent from the music of many other parts of the world. In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and Intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note. Other chords with more than three notes include added tone chords , extended chords and tone clusters , which are used in contemporary classical music , jazz and other genres
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Melody
A MELODY ("singing, chanting"), also TUNE, VOICE, or LINE, is a linear succession of musical tones that the listener perceives as a single entity. In its most literal sense, a melody is a combination of pitch and rhythm , while more figuratively, the term can include successions of other musical elements such as tonal color . It may be considered the foreground to the background accompaniment . A line or part need not be a foreground melody. Melodies often consist of one or more musical phrases or motifs , and are usually repeated throughout a composition in various forms. Melodies may also be described by their melodic motion or the pitches or the intervals between pitches (predominantly conjunct or disjunct or with further restrictions), pitch range, tension and release, continuity and coherence, cadence , and shape. The true goal of music—its proper enterprise—is melody
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Metropolitan Museum Of Art
www.metmuseum.org The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark Elevation by Simon Fieldhouse BUILT 1874; 143 years ago (1874) ARCHITECT Richard Morris Hunt
Richard Morris Hunt
; also Calvert Vaux
Calvert Vaux
; Jacob Wrey Mould ARCHITECTURAL STYLE Beaux-Arts NRHP REFERENCE # 86003556 SIGNIFICANT DATES ADDED TO NRHP January 29, 1972 DESIGNATED NHLJune 24, 1986 The METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, colloquially "THE MET," is located in New York City
New York City
and is the largest art museum in the United States, and is among the most visited art museums in the world. Its permanent collection contains over two million works, divided among seventeen curatorial departments
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National Gallery, London
5,908,254 (2015) * Ranked 3rd nationally * Ranked 11th globally DIRECTOR Gabriele Finaldi PUBLIC TRANSIT ACCESS Charing Cross
Charing Cross