HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Vir Illustris
The title vir illustris ("illustrious man") is used as a formal indication of standing in late antiquity to describe the highest ranks within the senates of Rome and Constantinople
[...More...]

"Vir Illustris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Notitia Dignitatum
The Notitia Dignitatum
Notitia Dignitatum
( Latin
Latin
for "The List of Offices") is a document of the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
that details the administrative organization of the Eastern and Western Empires. It is unique as one of very few surviving documents of Roman government and describes several thousand offices from the imperial court to provincial governments, diplomatic missions, and army units. It is usually considered to be accurate for the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the AD 420s and for the Eastern or Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
in the AD 390s
[...More...]

"Notitia Dignitatum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Late Antiquity
Late antiquity
Late antiquity
is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world, and the Near East. The development of the periodization has generally been accredited to historian Peter Brown, after the publication of his seminal work The World of Late Antiquity (1971). Precise boundaries for the period are a continuing matter of debate, but Brown proposes a period between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Generally, it can be thought of as from the end of the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century
Crisis of the Third Century
(c. 235 – 284) to, in the East, the Muslim conquests
Muslim conquests
in the mid-7th century
[...More...]

"Late Antiquity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thesaurus Linguae Latinae
The Thesaurus Linguae Latinae
Thesaurus Linguae Latinae
(abbreviated as ThLL or TLL) is a monumental dictionary of Latin
Latin
founded on historical principles. It encompasses the Latin
Latin
language from the time of its origin to the time of Isidore of Seville
Isidore of Seville
(died 636). The project began in 1894 and it was scheduled to be completed around the year 2050. The last fascicle of the P-volume appeared in 2010, and work is currently under way on both N and R. The institution that carries out the work of the dictionary is located in Munich, in the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities.[1] References[edit]^ Holmes, N. Questions and Answers, Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften
[...More...]

"Thesaurus Linguae Latinae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ulpian
Ulpian
Ulpian
(/ˈʌlpiən/; Latin: Gnaeus Domitius Annius Ulpianus; c. 170 – 223) was a prominent Roman jurist of Tyrian ancestry. He was considered one of the great legal authorities of his time and was one of the five jurists upon whom decisions were to be based according to the Law of Citations of Valentinian III.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] The exact time and place of his birth are unknown, but the period of his literary activity was between AD 211 and 222. He made his first appearance in public life as assessor in the auditorium of Papinian and member of the council of Septimius Severus; under Caracalla
Caracalla
he was master of the requests (magister libellorum)
[...More...]

"Ulpian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pandects
The Digest, also known as the Pandects (Latin: Digesta seu Pandectae, adapted from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
πανδέκτης pandektes, "all-containing"), is a name given to a compendium or digest of juristic writings on Roman law
Roman law
compiled by order of the Eastern Roman emperor Justinian I
Justinian I
in the 6th century CE (530–533). It is divided into 50 books. The Digest was part of a reduction and codification of all Roman laws up to that time, which later came to be known as the Corpus Juris Civilis (lit. "Body of Civil Law"[1]). The other two parts were a collection of statutes, the Codex (Code), which survives in a second edition, and an introductory textbook, the Institutes; all three parts were given force of law
[...More...]

"Pandects" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Codex Theodosianus
The Codex Theodosianus
Codex Theodosianus
(Eng. Theodosian Code) was a compilation of the laws of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
under the Christian
Christian
emperors since 312. A commission was established by Theodosius II
Theodosius II
and his co-emperor Valentinian III
Valentinian III
on 26 March 429[1][2] and the compilation was published by a constitution of 15 February 438
[...More...]

"Codex Theodosianus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Kleine Schriften
Kleine Schriften is a German phrase ("short writings" or "minor works"; Latin: Opuscula) often used as a title for a collection of articles and essays written by a single scholar over the course of a career. "Collected Papers" is an English equivalent. These shorter works were usually published previously in various periodicals or in collections of papers (such as a Festschrift) written by multiple scholars. A scholar's Kleine Schriften may be contained in a single volume, or several volumes published at once or (more commonly) in series within a period of a few years. Multi-volume collections may contain a scholar's minor or lesser-known book-length works as well. The title is usually reserved for the collected works of a scholar who wrote primarily in German or whose first language was German
[...More...]

"Kleine Schriften" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Realencyclopädie Der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft
The Realencyclopädie der classischen Altertumswissenschaft, commonly called the Pauly–Wissowa or simply RE, is a German encyclopedia of classical scholarship. With its supplements it comprises over eighty volumes.The Realencyclopädie (RE, 1893–1980) fills an entire bookcase in the library of the University of Göttingen's Seminar for Classical Philology. At the lower right are eight volumes of the encyclopedia's earlier edition (1837–1864).Der Neue PaulyThe RE is a complete revision of an older series of which the first volume was published by August Pauly
August Pauly
in 1839. Pauly died in 1845, his work unfinished; Christian Waltz and Wilhelm Teuffel
Wilhelm Teuffel
completed it in 1852. This first edition comprised six volumes
[...More...]

"Realencyclopädie Der Classischen Altertumswissenschaft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Carolingian
Non-agnatic lines:Robertian dynastyHouse of Capet Bosonid dynastyCarolingian dynastyThe Carolingian cross.PippinidsPippin the Elder (c. 580–640) Grimoald (616–656) Childebert the Adopted
Childebert the Adopted
(d. 662)Arnulfings Arnulf of Metz
Arnulf of Metz
(582–640) Ansegisel (d. 662 or 679) Chlodulf of Metz (d. 696 or 697) Pepin of Herstal
Pepin of Herstal
(635-714) Grimoald II (d. 714) Drogo of Champagne
Drogo of Champagne
(670–708) Theudoald (d. 741)Carolingians Charles Martel
Charles Martel
(686–741) Carloman (d
[...More...]

"Carolingian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Merovingian
The Merovingians (/ˌmɛroʊˈvɪndʒiən/) were a Salian Frankish dynasty that ruled the Franks
Franks
for nearly 300 years in a region known as Francia
Francia
in Latin, beginning in the middle of the 5th century. Their territory largely corresponded to ancient Gaul
Gaul
as well as the Roman provinces of Raetia, Germania Superior
Germania Superior
and the southern part of Germania. Childeric I
Childeric I
(c
[...More...]

"Merovingian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Justinian I
Justinian I
Justinian I
(/dʒʌˈstɪniən/; Latin: Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; Greek: Φλάβιος Πέτρος Σαββάτιος Ἰουστινιανός Flávios Pétros Sabbátios Ioustinianós; c. 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint
Saint
Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church,[3][4] was the Eastern Roman emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Justinian I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roman Senate
The Roman Senate
Senate
(Latin: Senatus Romanus; Italian: Senato Romano) was a political institution in ancient Rome. It was one of the most enduring institutions in Roman history, being established in the first days of the city (traditionally founded in 753 BC). It survived the overthrow of the kings in 509 BC, the fall of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
in the 1st century BC, the division of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 395 AD, the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in 476 AD, and the barbarian rule of Rome
Rome
in the 5th, 6th, and 7th centuries. During the days of the kingdom, it was little more than an advisory council to the king
[...More...]

"Roman Senate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Consul
Consul
Consul
(abbrev. cos.; Latin
Latin
plural consules) was the title of one of the chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, and subsequently a somewhat significant title under the Roman Empire. The title was also used in other city states and also revived in modern states, notably in the First French Republic. The relating adjective is consular, from the consularis.Contents1 Modern use of the term 2 Medieval city states 3 French Revolution3.1 French Republic 3.2 Roman Republic 3.3 Bolognese Republic4 Later modern republics4.1 Paraguay5 Other uses in antiquity5.1 Other city states 5.2 Private sphere 5.3 Revolutionary Greece6 See also 7 Sources and referencesModern use of the term[edit] Main article: Consul
Consul
(representative) In modern terminology, a consul is a type of diplomat
[...More...]

"Consul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Comes Sacrarum Largitionum
The comes sacrarum largitionum ("Count of the Sacred Largesses"; in Greek: κόμης τῶν θείων θησαυρῶν, kómes tōn theíon thesaurōn) was one of the senior fiscal officials of the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and the early Byzantine Empire. Although it is first attested in 342/345, its creation must date to ca. 318, under Emperor Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
(r. 306–337). The "comes" was the successor of the Principate-era rationalis, and supervised those financial sectors that were left outside the purview of the praetorian prefects: the taxation of senators, the chrysargyron tax, customs duties, mines, mints and state-run mills and textile factories. Initially, the comes also controlled the emperor's private domains, but these passed under the control of the comes rerum privatarum by the end of the 4th century
[...More...]

"Comes Sacrarum Largitionum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.