HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







Rosario, Santa Fe
Rosario (Spanish pronunciation: [roˈsaɾjo]) is the largest city in the central Argentina province of Santa Fe. The city is located 300 km (186 mi) northwest of Buenos Aires, on the west bank of the Paraná River. Rosario is the third most populous city in the country, and is also the most populous city in Argentina that is not a capital (provincial or national). With a growing and important metropolitan area, Greater Rosario has an estimated population of 1,700,000 [3]as of 2020.[4]. One of its main attractions includes the neoclassical, Art Nouveau[5], and Art Deco architecture that has been retained over the centuries in hundreds of residences, houses and public buildings. Rosario is the head city of the Rosario Department and is located at the heart of the major industrial corridor in Argentina. The city is a major railroad terminal and the shipping center for north-eastern Argentina
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Poverty

Poverty is the state of not having enough material possessions or income for a person's basic needs.[2] Poverty may include social, economic, and political elements.[3] Absolute poverty is the complete lack of the means necessary to meet basic personal needs, such as food, clothing, and shelter.[4] The floor at which absolute poverty is defined is always about the same, independent of the person's permanent location or era. On the other hand, relative poverty occurs when a person cannot meet a minimum level of living standards, compared to others in the same time and place. Therefore, the floor at which relative poverty is defined varies from one country to another, or from one society to another.[5] Many governments and non-governmental organizations try to reduce poverty by providing basic needs to people who are unable to earn a sufficient income
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Squatting
Squatting is the action of occupying an abandoned or unoccupied area of land or a building, usually residential, that the squatter does not own, rent or otherwise have lawful permission to use. Author Robert Neuwirth suggested in 2004 that there were one billion squatters globally. Squatting occurs worldwide and tends to occur when people who are poor and homeless find empty buildings or land to occupy for housing. It has a long history, broken down by country below. In developing countries and least developed countries, shanty towns often begin as squatted settlements. There are pavement dwellers and slums in India and South Africa, represented by groups such as Slum Dwellers International and Abahlali baseMjondolo. In Hong Kong there are rooftop slums. In Brazil, there are favelas and large social movements of thousands of people such as the Homeless Workers' Movement (MTST) and the Landless Workers' Movement (MST)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Campamento (Chile)
Campamento ("camp", or "tent city") and población callampa ("mushroom town") are terms given in Chile to shanty towns. The term "mushroom town" refers to the speed in which these informal settlements sprung up between the 1960s and the 1980s, literally overnight. Nowadays, the term campamento has replaced "mushroom town". According to the NGO Un Techo para Chile ("A roof for Chile"), a campamento is defined as a group of crude dwellings of more than eight families, lacking at least one of the following basic services: drinking water, electricity and wastewater treatment, and which are illegally residing on the land.[1] As of 2004, there were 531 campamentos in Chile. A total of 27,785 houses were home to 32,371 families in these shanty towns
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Urban Village (China)
Urban villages (Chinese: 城中村; pinyin: chéngzhōngcūn; literally: "village in city") are villages that appear on both the outskirts and the downtown segments of major Chinese cities, including Shenzhen and Guangzhou. They are surrounded by skyscrapers, transportation infrastructures, and other modern urban constructions. Urban villages are a unique phenomenon that formed part of China's urbanization efforts. Urban villages are commonly inhabited by the poor and transient, and as such they are associated with squalor, overcrowding and social problems
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Athens Refugee Squats
Athens refugee squats exist since the 2015 spike in the European migrant crisis, Greece has been a destination for migrants seeking refuge on the European continent via the "Balkan Route."[1] Coalitions of solidarity groups and migrants have established squats throughout Athens (mostly in Exarcheia) to house refugees, demonstrating an alternative to solutions offered by the European Union and NGOs.[2] The squats are grouped together in the Coordination of Refugee Squats. Notable projects included 5th School and City Plaza. In late 2019, the New Democracy party declared it would evict all the squats. Following the 2008 financial crisis, a Greek government-debt crisis prompted the European Troika to implement austerity policies in the form of three distinct memoranda, despite public protest
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Asentamiento
An asentamiento irregular, known colloquially as an asentamiento (Spanish pronunciation: [asentaˈmjento]) is a shanty town in Latin America, particularly around Guatemala City and Montevideo. Most have been established in the last 20 years as a result of economic inequalities between rural and metropolitan areas in Guatemala and Uruguay. In 15 of the 23 districts of Guatemala City, there are precarious settlements. In 1984, there were 103 and by 1991 there were 232. In 2016 there were 297.[1] In 1984, 800 families made a land invasion and successfully squatted an area called El Mezquital. The settlement eventually swelled to over 25,000 people
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Barrio
Barrio (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈbarjo]) is a Spanish word meaning "quarter" or "neighborhood." In the modern Spanish language, “barrio” is generally defined as each area of a city, usually differentiated by functional (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, etc.), social, architectural or morphological features.[1] In Spain, several Latin American countries and the Philippines, the term is also used officially to denote a division of a municipality. In Argentina and Uruguay, a barrio is a division of a municipality officially delineated by the local authority at a later time, and it sometimes keeps a distinct character from others (as in the barrios of Buenos Aires even if they have been superseded by larger administrative divisions). The word does not have a special socioeconomic connotation unless it is used in contrast to the centro (city center or downtown)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]