HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Vikramshila
Vikramashila
Vikramashila
(IAST: Vikramaśilā) was one of the two most important centres of learning in India
India
during the Pala Empire, along with Nalanda. Vikramashila
Vikramashila
was established by King Dharmapala (783 to 820) in response to a supposed decline in the quality of scholarship at Nalanda. Atisha, the renowned pandita, is sometimes listed as a notable abbot. It was destroyed by the forces of Muhammad bin Bakhtiyar Khilji
Bakhtiyar Khilji
around 1200.[1] Vikramashila
Vikramashila
(village Antichak, district Bhagalpur, Bihar) is located at about 50 km east of Bhagalpur
Bhagalpur
and about 13 km north-east of Kahalgaon, a town in Bhagalpur district
Bhagalpur district

[...More...]

"Vikramshila" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxila
Taxila
Taxila
or Takshashila was an ancient city in what is now northern Pakistan. It is an important archaeological site and in 1980, was declared a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site.[6] Its ruins lie near modern Taxila, in Punjab, Pakistan, about 35 km (22 mi) northwest of Rawalpindi.[7] Taxila
Taxila
was situated at the pivotal junction of the Indian subcontinent and Central Asia. Its origin as a city goes back to c. 1000 BCE. Some ruins at Taxila
Taxila
date to the time of the Achaemenid Empire
Achaemenid Empire
in the 6th century BCE, followed successively by Mauryan, Indo-Greek, Indo-Scythian, and Kushan
Kushan
periods. Owing to its strategic location, Taxila
Taxila
has changed hands many times over the centuries, with many empires vying for its control
[...More...]

"Taxila" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Terracotta
Terracotta, terra cotta or terra-cotta (pronounced [ˌtɛrraˈkɔtta]; Italian: "baked earth",[2] from the Latin terra cocta),[3] a type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic,[4] where the fired body is porous. Terracotta
Terracotta
is the term normally used for sculpture made in earthenware, and also for various utilitarian uses including vessels (notably flower pots), water and waste water pipes, roofing tiles, bricks, and surface embellishment in building construction.[5] The term is also used to refer to the natural, brownish orange color, of most terracotta, which varies considerably. This article covers the senses of terracotta as a medium in sculpture, as in the Terracotta Army
Terracotta Army
and Greek terracotta figurines, and architectural decoration. Asian and European sculpture in porcelain is not covered
[...More...]

"Terracotta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naropa
Nāropā (Prakrit; Sanskrit: Nāropadā[1] or Naḍapāda[2]) (probably died ca. 1040 CE)[3] was an Indian Buddhist Mahasiddha. He was the disciple of Tilopa and brother, or some sources say partner and pupil, of Niguma.[4] As an Indian Mahasiddha, Naropa's instructions inform Vajrayana, particularly his six yogas of Naropa relevant to the completion stage of anuttarayogatantra. Although some accounts relate that Naropa
Naropa
was the personal teacher of Marpa Lotsawa, other accounts suggest that Marpa held Naropa's lineage through intermediary disciples only.[5]Contents1 Name 2 Biography 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingName[edit] According to scholar John Newman, "the Tibetans give Nāro's name as Nā ro pa, Nā ro paṇ chen, Nā ro ta pa, and so forth. The manuscript of the Paramarthasaṃgraha preserves a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
form Naḍapāda (Paramarthasaṃgraha 74)
[...More...]

"Naropa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cakrasamvara Tantra
New branches:Blue Lotus AssemblyGateway of the Hidden FlowerNew Kadampa BuddhismShambhala BuddhismTrue Awakening TraditionHistoryTantrismMahasiddhaSahajaPursuitBuddhahood BodhisattvaKalachakraPracticesGeneration stage Completion stagePhowaTantric techniques: Fourfold division:KriyayogaCharyayogaYogatantraAnuttarayogatantraTwofold division:Inner TantrasOuter TantrasThought forms and visualisation:MandalaMantraMudraThangkaYantraYoga:Deity yogaDream yogaDeath yogaNgöndro Guru
[...More...]

"Cakrasamvara Tantra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rinchen Zangpo
(Lochen) Rinchen Zangpo
Rinchen Zangpo
(958–1055), also known as Mahaguru, was a principal lotsawa or translator of Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Buddhist texts
Buddhist texts
into Tibetan during the second diffusion of Buddhism
Buddhism
in Tibet (or the New Translation School or New Mantra
Mantra
School period). He was a student of the famous Indian master, Atisha.[1][2] His associates included (Locheng) Legpai Sherab
[...More...]

"Rinchen Zangpo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
[...More...]

"India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Patna University
Patna
Patna
University, the first university in Bihar, was established on 1 October 1917 during the British Raj,[1] and is the seventh oldest university of the Indian subcontinent. At that time, the jurisdiction of the university extended to Bihar, Odisha, and the Kingdom of Nepal. The university oversaw examinations for educational institutions ranging from school finals to the postgraduate levels
[...More...]

"Patna University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Stupa
A stupa (Sanskrit: "heap") is a mound-like or hemispherical structure containing relics (śarīra - typically the remains of Buddhist monks or nuns) that is used as a place of meditation.[2] A related architectural term is a chaitya, which is a prayer hall or temple containing a stupa. In Buddhism, circumambulation or pradakhshina has been an important ritual and devotional practice since the earliest times, and stupas always have a pradakhshina path around them.Contents1 Description and history1.1 Notable stupas 1.2 Types of stupas2 Symbolism2.1 Five purified elements3 Construction3.1 Treasury 3.2 Tree of Life 3.3 Benefits4 Tibetan stupas4.1 Lotus Blossom Stupa 4.2 Enlightenment Stupa 4.3 Stupa
[...More...]

"Stupa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archaeological Survey Of India
The Archaeological Survey of India, is a Government of India
Government of India
(Ministry of Culture) organisation responsible for archaeological research and the conservation and preservation of cultural monuments in the country. It was founded in 1861 by the British Raj. ASI (archaeology) as well as BSI (botany), FSI (forests), FiSI (fisheries), GSI (geology), IIEE (ecology), NIO (oceanography), RGCCI (Census of India), SI (cartography) and ZSI (zoology) are key national survey organisations of India.Contents1 History1.1 Formation of the ASI 1.2 1885–1901 1.3 1901–1947 1.4 1947–19562 Organisation2.1 Circles 2.2 Directors-General3 Museums 4 Library 5 Publications 6 State government archaeological departments 7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] ASI was founded in 1861 by Alexander Cunningham
Alexander Cunningham
who also became its first Director-General
[...More...]

"Archaeological Survey Of India" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Antechamber
An antechamber (also known as an anteroom or ante-room) is a smaller room or vestibule serving as an entryway into a larger one. The word is formed of the Latin ante camera, meaning "room before". In some cases, an antechamber provides a space for a host to prepare or conduct private business away from a larger party or congregation. In a theme park, an antechamber may be used to tell guests about a ride before they experience it. References[edit] This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chambers, Ephraim, ed. (1728). "Antechamber". Cyclopædia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences
Cyclopædia, or an Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences
(first ed.). James and John Knapton, et al. This article related to a type of room in a building is a stub
[...More...]

"Antechamber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lime (material)
Lime is a calcium-containing inorganic mineral in which carbonates, oxides, and hydroxides predominate. In the strict sense of the term, lime is calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. It is also the name of the natural mineral (native lime) CaO which occurs as a product of coal seam fires and in altered limestone xenoliths in volcanic ejecta.[1] The word lime originates with its earliest use as building mortar and has the sense of sticking or adhering.[2] These materials are still used in large quantities as building and engineering materials (including limestone products, cement, concrete, and mortar), as chemical feedstocks, and for sugar refining, among other uses. Lime industries and the use of many of the resulting products date from prehistoric times in both the Old World
Old World
and the New World
[...More...]

"Lime (material)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
[...More...]

"Buddha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Avalokiteshvara
Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
(/ˌʌvloʊkɪˈteɪʃvərə, ˌʌvə-/ UV-loh-kih-TAY-shvər-ə, UV-ə-;[1] Sanskrit: अवलोकितेश्वर) is a bodhisattva who embodies the compassion of all Buddhas. This bodhisattva is variably depicted, described and is portrayed in different cultures as either female or male.[2] In Chinese Buddhism, Avalokiteśvara
Avalokiteśvara
has become the somewhat different female figure Guanyin
[...More...]

"Avalokiteshvara" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manjusri
Mañjuśrī is a bodhisattva associated with prajñā (insight) in Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism. In Tibetan Buddhism, he is also a yidam. His name means "Gentle Glory" in Sanskrit.[1] Mañjuśrī is also known by the fuller name of Mañjuśrīkumārabhūta,[2] literally "Mañjuśrī, Still a Youth" or, less literally, "Prince Mañjuśrī".Contents1 In Mahāyāna Buddhism 2 Vajrayana
Vajrayana
Buddhism 3 Iconography 4 Mantras 5 In Buddhist cultures5.1 In China 5.2 In Tibet 5.3 In Nepal 5.4 In Japan 5.5 In Indonesia6 Gallery 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksIn Mahāyāna Buddhism[edit] Manjushri
Manjushri
statue
[...More...]

"Manjusri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.