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Viking Invasions
Viking expansion
Viking expansion
is the process by which the Vikings[a] sailed most of the North Atlantic, reaching south to North Africa
North Africa
and east to Russia, Constantinople
Constantinople
and the Middle East
Middle East
as looters, traders, colonists and mercenaries
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Vikings
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
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Youth Bulge
A population pyramid, also called an "age pyramid", is a graphical illustration that shows the distribution of various age groups in a population (typically that of a country or region of the world), which forms the shape of a pyramid when the population is growing.[1] This tool can be used to visualize and age composition of a particular population.[2] It is also used in ecology to determine the overall age distribution of a population; an indication of the reproductive capabilities and likelihood of the continuation of a species. Population pyramid often contains continuous stacked-histogram bars. The population size is depicted on the x-axis (horizontal), and age-groups on y-axis (vertical).[3] Males are conventionally shown on the left and females on the right, and they may be measured by raw number or as a percentage of the total population. Population pyramids are often viewed as the most effective way to graphically depict the age and distribution of a population, partly because
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Danelaw
The Danelaw
Danelaw
(/ˈdeɪnˌlɔː/, also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu;[1] Danish: Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England
England
in which the laws of the Danes held sway[2] and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons. Danelaw
Danelaw
contrasts West Saxon law and Mercian law. The term is first recorded in the early eleventh century as Dena lage.[3] Modern historians have extended the term to a geographical designation. The areas that constituted the Danelaw
Danelaw
lie in northern and eastern England. The Danelaw
Danelaw
originated from the Viking
Viking
expansion of the 9th century AD, although the term was not used to describe a geographic area until the 11th century AD
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Isle Of Skye
Skye, or the Isle of Skye
Skye
(/skaɪ/; Scottish Gaelic: An t-Eilean Sgitheanach or Eilean a' Cheò), is the largest and northernmost of the major islands in the Inner Hebrides
Inner Hebrides
of Scotland.[Note 1] The island's peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country.[9][10] Although it has been suggested that the Gaelic Sgitheanach describes a winged shape there is no definitive agreement as to the name's origins. The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
period, and its history includes a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by Clan MacLeod
Clan MacLeod
and Clan Donald
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Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
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DNA
Deoxyribonucleic acid (/diˈɒksiˌraɪboʊnjʊˈkliːɪk, -ˈkleɪ.ɪk/ ( listen);[1] DNA) is a thread-like chain of nucleotides carrying the genetic instructions used in the growth, development, functioning and reproduction of all known living organisms and many viruses. DNA
DNA
and ribonucleic acid (RNA) are nucleic acids; alongside proteins, lipids and complex carbohydrates (polysaccharides), they are one of the four major types of macromolecules that are essential for all known forms of life. Most DNA
DNA
molecules consist of two biopolymer strands coiled around each other to form a double helix. The two DNA
DNA
strands are called polynucleotides since they are composed of simpler monomer units called nucleotides.[2][3] Each nucleotide is composed of one of four nitrogen-containing nucleobases (cytosine [C], guanine [G], adenine [A] or thymine [T]), a sugar called deoxyribose, and a phosphate group
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Isotope Analysis
Isotope analysis
Isotope analysis
is the identification of isotopic signature, the abundance of certain stable isotopes and chemical elements within organic and inorganic compounds. Isotopic analysis can be used to understand the flow of energy through a food web, to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions, to investigate human and animal diets in the past, for food authentification, and a variety of other physical, geological, palaeontological and chemical processes
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Osteology
Osteology
Osteology
is the scientific study of bones, practiced by osteologists. A subdiscipline of anatomy, anthropology, and archaeology, osteology is a detailed study of the structure of bones, skeletal elements, teeth, microbone morphology, function, disease, pathology, the process of ossification (from cartilaginous molds), the resistance and hardness of bones (biophysics), etc
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John Charles Dollman
John Charles Dollman
John Charles Dollman
RWS RI ROI (1851–1934) was an English painter and illustrator. Dollman was born in Hove
Hove
on 6 May 1851 and moved to London to study at South Kensington
South Kensington
and the Royal Academy Schools, after which he set up a studio at Bedford Park, London. He exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1870 to 1912, and was elected RWS (Member of the Royal Watercolour Society) in 1913. Dollman was also an illustrator, working in black and white or colour for magazines such as the Graphic during and after the 1880s. Some of his early work has been said to have influenced Van Gogh.[1][2] Works[edit] A central theme was ambitious mythological pictures such as a Viking Foray, a Viking horde entitled the Ravager, The Unknown (1912), featuring a girl surrounded by chimps and Orpheus and his Lute with Lions
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North Atlantic
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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Silk Road
The Silk
Silk
Road was an ancient network of trade routes connecting the East and West which for centuries was central to cultural interaction between them.[1][2][3] The Silk
Silk
Road refers to both the terrestrial and the maritime routes connecting Asia with the Middle East
Middle East
and southern Europe. The Silk
Silk
Road derives its name from the lucrative trade in silk carried out along its length, beginning in the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
(207 BCE–220 CE)
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Expansion Of Islam
Early Muslim conquests
Early Muslim conquests
in the years following the Prophet Muhammad's death led to the creation of the caliphates, occupying a vast geographical area and conversion to Islam
Islam
was boosted by missionary activities particularly those of Imams, who easily intermingled with local populace to propagate the religious teachings.[1] These early caliphates, coupled with Muslim
Muslim
economics and trading and the later expansion of the Ottoman Empire, resulted in Islam's spread outwards from Mecca
Mecca
towards both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the creation of the Muslim
Muslim
world
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Raptio
Raptio (in archaic or literary English rendered as rape) is a Latin term referring to the large-scale abduction of women, i.e. kidnapping either for marriage or enslavement (particularly sexual slavery). The equivalent term Frauenraub, originally from German, is used in English in the field of art history. Bride kidnapping is distinguished from raptio in that the former is the abduction of one woman by one man (and his friends and relatives), whereas the latter is the abduction of women by groups of men, possibly in a time of war.Look up rape in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Contents1 Terminology 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesTerminology[edit] The English word rape retains the Latin meaning in literary language, but the meaning is obscured by the more current meaning of "sexual violation"
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Female Infanticide
Female infanticide
Female infanticide
is the deliberate killing of newborn female children. In countries with a history of female infanticide, the modern practice of sex-selective abortion is often discussed as a closely related issue. Female infanticide
Female infanticide
is a major cause of concern in several nations such as China, India and Pakistan. It has been argued that the "low status" in which women are viewed in patriarchal societies creates a bias against females.[1] An alternative hypothesis is that female infanticides could be the result rigid monogamous societies. Homo sapiens are male polygamous by biology. As religious and social barriers enforce unnatural monogamy it leads to surplus of women. This surplus of women decreases their "market value" and leads to many social ills including female infanticide
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