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Victory
The term victory (from Latin
Latin
victoria) originally applied to warfare, and denotes success achieved in personal combat, after military operations in general or, by extension, in any competition. Success in a military campaign is considered[by whom?] a strategic victory, while the success in a military engagement is a tactical victory.Play mediaHemp for Victory, a short documentary produced by the United States Department of Agriculture during World War
War
IIIn terms of human emotion, victory accompanies strong feelings of elation, and in human behaviour often exhibits movements and poses paralleling threat display preceding the combat, which are associated[by whom?] with the excess endorphin built up preceding and during combat
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Resurrection Of Christ
The resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus
Jesus
rose again from the dead
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Tamil Language
 Sri Lanka  Singapore  India:Tamil Nadu[3] Puducherry[4] Andaman & Nicobar Islands[5]Recognised minority language in Malaysia[6]  Mauritius[7]  South Africa[8]Language codesISO 639-1 taISO 639-2 tamISO 639-3 Variously: tam – Modern Tamil oty – Old Tamil ptq – Pattapu BhashaiLinguist Listoty Old TamilGlottolog tamil1289  Modern Tamil[9] oldt1248  Old Tamil[10]Linguasphere 49-EBE-aThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Indic text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks or boxes, misplaced vowels or missing conjuncts instead of Indic text.Tamil is written in a non-Latin script
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Batavian Rebellion
Depending on definition of loyalty:One Batavi ala and eight cohorts; 5,000+ Batavi (mostly cavalry) Two defecting Roman legions; 10,000 Varying support from other tribes; likely thousandsTotal: 5,000–20,000Initially: Four Roman legions
Roman legions
and attempted reinforcements; 10,000–15,000+Later: Eight Roman legions; 40,000Total: 60,000–65,000Casualties and lossesRelatively light; Batavi army survives to later serve Romans again 10,000–20,000+v t eYear of the Four EmperorsForum Julii Placentia Locus Castorum 1st Bedriacum 2nd Bedriacum Castra Vetera Augusta TreverorumThe Revolt of the Batavi
Revolt of the Batavi
took place in the Roman province
Roman province
of Germania Inferior between AD 69 and 70. It was an uprising against the Roman Empire started by the Batavi, a small but militarily powerful Germanic or Celtic tribe that inhabited Batavia, on the delta of the river Rhine
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Winning (other)
Winning is a 1969 movie starring Paul Newman. Winning may also refer to:Winning (book), a 2005 management book by Jack Welch "Winning" (Russ Ballard Song), also covered by Santana in 1981 "Winning", a song by Chris Rea from Wired to the Moon "Winning", a song by Emily Haines (and the Soft Skeletons) from Knives Don't Have Your Back "Winning", a song by Gentle Giant from The Missing PiecePeople with surname[edit]David Winning (born 1961), Canadian and American film director, producer, screenwriter Thomas Winning (1925-2001), Scottish Roman Catholic cardinalSee also[edit]Charlie Sheen, who used the word as a catch phrase Win (other) All pages beginning with "Winning" All pages with a title containing WinningThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Winning. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Wodan
In Germanic mythology, Odin
Odin
(from Old Norse
Old Norse
Óðinn) is a widely revered god. In Norse mythology, from which stems most of the information about the god, Odin
Odin
is associated with wisdom, healing, death, royalty, the gallows, knowledge, battle, sorcery, poetry, frenzy, and the runic alphabet, and is the husband of the goddess Frigg
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Lombards
The Lombards
Lombards
or Longobards (Latin: Langobardi, Italian: Longobardi [loŋɡoˈbardi], Lombard: Longobard (Western)) were a Germanic people who ruled most of the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
from 568 to 774. The Lombard historian Paul the Deacon
Paul the Deacon
wrote in the Historia Langobardorum that the Lombards
Lombards
descended from a small tribe called the Winnili,[1] who dwelt in southern Scandinavia[2] (Scadanan) before migrating to seek new lands. In the 1st century AD, they formed part of the Suebi, in northwestern Germany. By the end of the 5th century, they had moved into the area roughly coinciding with modern Austria and Slovakia
Slovakia
north of the Danube
Danube
river, where they subdued the Heruls and later fought frequent wars with the Gepids
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Spolia
Spolia
Spolia
(Latin, 'spoils'), repurposed building stone for new construction, or decorative sculpture reused in new monuments, is the result of an ancient and widespread practice whereby stone that has been quarried, cut, and used in a built structure, is carried away to be used elsewhere. The practice is of particular interest to historians, archaeologists and architectural historians since the gravestones, monuments and architectural fragments of antiquity are frequently found embedded in structures built centuries or millennia later. Archaeologist Philip A. Barker gives the example of a late Roman period (probably 1st century) tombstone from Wroxeter
Wroxeter
that could be seen to have been cut down and undergone weathering while in use as part of an exterior wall, then, possibly as late as the 5th century, reinscribed for reuse as a tombstone.[1] The practice was common in late antiquity
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Headhunting
Headhunting
Headhunting
is the practice of taking and preserving a person's head after killing the person. Headhunting
Headhunting
was practised in historic times in parts of Oceania, South Asia
South Asia
and Southeast Asia, West and Central Africa, Mesoamerica, and Europe
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English-language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
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Gaius Julius Civilis
The gens Julia or Iulia was one of the most ancient patrician families at Ancient Rome. Members of the gens attained the highest dignities of the state in the earliest times of the Republic. The first of the family to obtain the consulship was Gaius Julius Iulus in 489 BC. The gens is perhaps best known, however, for Gaius Julius Caesar, the dictator, and grand uncle of the emperor Augustus, through whom the name was passed to the so-called Julio-Claudian dynasty
Julio-Claudian dynasty
of the 1st century AD
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Hero
A hero (masculine) or heroine (feminine) is a person or main character of a literary work who, in the face of danger, combats adversity through feats of ingenuity, bravery or strength, often sacrificing their own personal concerns for a greater good. The concept of the hero can be found in classical literature. It is the main or revered character in heroic epic poetry celebrated through ancient legends of a people, often striving for military conquest and living by a continually flawed personal honor code.[1] The definition of a hero has changed throughout time
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Monster
A monster is a creature which produces fear or physical harm by its appearance or its actions. Derived from the Latin
Latin
monstrum, the word usually connotes something wrong or evil; a monster is generally morally objectionable, physically or psychologically hideous, or a freak of nature. They are usually composites of different creatures, or hybrids of humans and animals, but the term can also be applied figuratively to describe someone with similar characteristics, such as a person who does cruel or horrific things. Monsters pre-date written history, but do not emerge from a cultural void
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Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
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