HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Victoria Cross
The Victoria Cross
Victoria Cross
(VC) is the highest award of the United Kingdom honours system. It is awarded for gallantry "in the presence of the enemy" to members of the British armed forces. It may be awarded posthumously. It was previously awarded to Commonwealth countries, most of which have established their own honours systems and no longer recommend British honours. It may be awarded to a person of any military rank in any service and to civilians under military command although no civilian has received the award since 1879. Since the first awards were presented by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
in 1857, two thirds of all awards have been personally presented by the British monarch. These investitures are usually held at Buckingham Palace. The VC was introduced on 29 January 1856 by Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
to honour acts of valour during the Crimean War
[...More...]

"Victoria Cross" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Royal Logistic Corps
Royal
Royal
may refer to:Royalty Royal
Royal
familyContents1 Places1.1 United States 1.2 Elsewhere2 Schools 3 Companies 4 Sports 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPlaces[edit] United States[edit]Royal, Arkansas, an unincorpo
[...More...]

"Royal Logistic Corps" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

War Office
The War Office[1] was a department of the British Government responsible for the administration of the British Army
British Army
between 1857 and 1964, when its functions were transferred to the Ministry of Defence. Until 1855 a number of independent offices and individuals were responsible for various aspects of Army administration. The three most important were the Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, the Secretary at War and the Secretary of State for War
[...More...]

"War Office" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

MoD Donnington
Donnington may refer to:Donnington, Berkshire Donnington CastleDonnington, Gloucestershire Donnington, Herefordshire Donnington, Oxfordshire, a suburb of Oxford Donnington Bridge, a bridge over the River ThamesDonnington, Shropshire, in the parish of Wroxeter and Uppington Donnington, Telford, Shropshire Donnington, West SussexSee also[edit]Donington (other) Castle Donington Donington Park, a motor racing track and music festival venue near Castle Donington, North West Leicestershire, England.This disambiguation page
[...More...]

"MoD Donnington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Field Officer
A field officer, field grade officer, or senior officer is an army, Marine, or air force commissioned officer senior in rank to a company officer but junior to a general officer.[1] In most armies this corresponds to the ranks of major, lieutenant colonel and colonel, or their equivalents. Some countries also include brigadier in the definition. Historically, a regiment or battalion's field officers made up its command element.Contents1 Canada 2 France 3 Germany 4 Russia 5 United Kingdom and some Commonwealth countries 6 United States 7 ReferencesCanada[edit] In the Canadian Armed Forces, the equivalent of field officers are senior officers (French: Officiers supérieurs); they include the army and air force ranks of Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Colonel, and the naval ranks of Lieutenant-Commander, Commander, and Captain. France[edit] In the French Forces, field officers are called officiers supérieurs (Senior Officers)
[...More...]

"Field Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crown Of Saint Edward
St Edward's Crown
St Edward's Crown
is the centrepiece of the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom.[2] Named after Edward the Confessor, it has been traditionally used to crown English and British monarchs at their coronations since the 13th century. The original crown was a holy relic kept at Westminster Abbey, Edward's burial place, until the regalia were either sold or melted down after Parliament abolished the monarchy in 1649, during the English Civil War. The present version of St Edward's Crown
St Edward's Crown
was made for Charles II in 1661. It is solid gold, 30 centimetres (12 in) tall, weighs 2.23 kilograms (4.9 lb), and is decorated with 444 precious and semi-precious stones. The crown is similar in weight and overall appearance to the original, but its arches are Baroque. After 1689, it was not used to crown a monarch for over 200 years
[...More...]

"Crown Of Saint Edward" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Warrant (law)
A warrant is generally a specific type of authorization, that is, a writ issued by a competent officer, usually a judge or magistrate, which permits an otherwise illegal act that would violate individual rights and affords the person executing the writ protection from damages if the act is performed. A warrant is usually issued by a court and is directed to a sheriff, a constable, or a police officer. Warrants normally issued by a court include search warrants, arrest warrants, and execution warrants.Contents1 United Kingdom 2 United States2.1 History 2.2 Practice3 Types of warrant 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksUnited Kingdom[edit] In the United Kingdom, senior public appointments are made by warrant under the royal sign-manual, the personal signature of the monarch, on the recommendation of the government. In an interesting survival from medieval times, these warrants abate (lose their force) on the death of the sovereign if they have not already been executed
[...More...]

"Warrant (law)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Royal Sign-manual
The royal sign-manual is the signature of the sovereign, by the affixing of which the monarch expresses his or her pleasure either by order, commission, or warrant. A sign-manual warrant may be either an executive act (for example, an appointment to an office), or an authority for affixing the Great Seal of the pertinent realm. The sign-manual is also used to give power to make and ratify treaties. Sign manual, with or without hyphen, is an old term for a hand-written signature in general. It is also referred to as sign manual and signet.Contents1 Composition 2 Uses 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksComposition[edit] The royal sign-manual usually consists of the sovereign's regnal name (without number, if otherwise used), followed by the letter R for Rex (king) or Regina (queen). Thus, the signs-manual of both Elizabeth I and Elizabeth II
Elizabeth II
read Elizabeth R
[...More...]

"Royal Sign-manual" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

London Gazette
The London Gazette
The London Gazette
is one of the official journals of record of the British government, and the most important among such official journals in the United Kingdom, in which certain statutory notices are required to be published. The London Gazette
The London Gazette
claims to be the oldest surviving English newspaper and the oldest continuously published newspaper in the UK, having been first published on 7 November 1665 as The Oxford
Oxford
Gazette.[a][2] This claim is also made by the Stamford Mercury and Berrow's Worcester Journal, because The Gazette is not a conventional newspaper offering general news coverage
[...More...]

"London Gazette" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Albert, Prince Consort
Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg
Coburg
and Gotha (Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emmanuel;[1] 26 August 1819 – 14 December 1861) was the husband and consort of Queen Victoria. He was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, to a family connected to many of Europe's ruling monarchs. At the age of 20, he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria; they had nine children. Initially he felt constrained by his role of consort, which did not afford him power or responsibilities. He gradually developed a reputation for supporting public causes, such as educational reform and the abolition of slavery worldwide, and was entrusted with running the Queen's household, office and estates. He was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which was a resounding success. Victoria came to depend more and more on his support and guidance
[...More...]

"Albert, Prince Consort" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Troy Ounce
Troy weight
Troy weight
is a system of units of mass customarily used for precious metals and gemstones. One troy ounce (abbreviated "t oz" or "oz t") is equal to 7001311034768000000♠31.1034768 grams, (or about 1.0971 oz. avoirdupois, the "avoirdupois" ounce being the most common definition of an "ounce" in the US).[1] There are only 12 troy ounces per troy pound, rather than the 16 ounces per pound found in the more common avoirdupois system. However, the avoirdupois pound has 7000 grains whereas the troy pound has only 5760 grains (i.e. 12 × 480 grains). Both systems use the same grain defined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959 as 6998647989100000000♠0.06479891 grams. Therefore, the troy ounce is 480 grains or 31.10 grams, compared with the avoirdupois ounce, which is 437.5 grains or 28.35 grams. The troy ounce, then, is about 10% heavier (ratio 192/175) than the avoirdupois ounce
[...More...]

"Troy Ounce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First Opium War
British victoryTreaty of NankingTerritorial changes Hong Kong Island
Hong Kong Island
ceded to BritainBelligerents United Kingdom British East India Company China
China
(Qing d
[...More...]

"First Opium War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"First World War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Boxer Rebellion
Legations: Claude Maxwell MacDonald Seymour Expedition: Sir Edward Seymour Gaselee Expedition: Alfred Gaselee Yevgeni Alekseyev Nikolai Linevich Fukushima Yasumasa Yamaguchi Motomi(ja:山口素臣) Adna Chaffee Emerson H
[...More...]

"Boxer Rebellion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sprue (manufacturing)
A sprue is the passage through which liquid material is introduced into a mold. In many cases it controls the flow of material into the mold. During casting or molding, the material in the sprue will solidify and need to be removed from the finished part. This excess material is also called a sprue.Contents1 Casting1.1 Function 1.2 Sprue design2 Injection molding2.1 Sprues, runners, and gates3 See alsoCasting[edit] In casting, a sprue is the passage through which a molten material is introduced into a mold, and the term also refers to the excess material which solidifies in the sprue passage. In sand casting, the sprue is formed by a dowel, which is removed from the sand to make the hole into which the metal is poured. Function[edit] Sprues can serve as filters, as heat sinks, and as feeders
[...More...]

"Sprue (manufacturing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Firepower - The Royal Artillery Museum
Coordinates: 51°29′38″N 0°4′15″E / 51.49389°N 0.07083°E / 51.49389; 0.07083Firepower – The Royal Artillery
Royal Artillery
MuseumEstablished 27 May 2001 (2001-05-27)Dissolved 8 July 2016 (2016-07-08)Location Royal Arsenal, Woolwich, South East LondonPublic transit access Woolwich
Woolwich
Arsenal Website Official websiteFirepower: The Royal Artillery
Royal Artillery
Museum was a military museum in Woolwich
Woolwich
in south-east London, England, which told the story of the Royal Artillery
Royal Artillery
and of the Royal Arsenal
[...More...]

"Firepower - The Royal Artillery Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.