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VfB Stuttgart II
VfB Stuttgart
Stuttgart
II is a German football team located in Stuttgart, currently playing in the Regionalliga Südwest
Regionalliga Südwest
due to their relegation from the 3. Liga
3. Liga
in the season 2015/16. They are the reserve team of VfB Stuttgart. Until 2005 the team played under the name of VfB Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Amateure.Contents1 History 2 Relationship with VfB Stuttgart 3 The Robert-Schlienz Stadium 4 Honours4.1 League 4.2 Cup5 Recent coaches 6 Recent seasons6.1 Key7 Players7.1 Current squad8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] VfB Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Amateure first made an appearance at the highest level of local amateur football, the third division Amateurliga Württemberg, in 1959–60, winning the league
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2. Bundesliga
The 2. Bundesliga
Bundesliga
(Zweite Bundesliga, [ˈt͡svaɪ̯tə ˈbʊndəsliːɡa]) is the second division of professional football in Germany. The 2. Bundesliga
Bundesliga
is ranked below the Bundesliga
Bundesliga
and above the 3. Liga
3. Liga
in the German football league system. All of the 2. Bundesliga
Bundesliga
clubs qualify for the DFB-Pokal, the annual German Cup competition. A total of 125 clubs have competed in the 2. Bundesliga since its foundation. The decision to establish the league as the second level of football in West Germany
Germany
was made in May 1973. The league started operating in August 1974, then with two divisions of 20 clubs. It was reduced to a single division in 1981
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Goalkeeper (association Football)
Goalkeeper, often shortened to keeper or goalie, is one of the major positions of association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's primary role is to prevent the opposing team from successfully moving the ball over the defended goal-line (between the posts and under the crossbar). This is accomplished by the goalkeeper moving into the path of the ball and either catching it or directing it away from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are able to use their hands, making them (outside throw-ins) the only players on the field permitted to handle the ball. The back pass rule prevents goalkeepers handling direct passes back to them from teammates. Goalkeepers usually perform goal kicks, and also give commands to their defense during corner kicks, direct and indirect free kicks, and marking
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Eintracht Frankfurt
Eintracht Frankfurt
Frankfurt
e.V. (German pronunciation: [ˈʔaɪ̯ntʁaxt ˈfʁaŋkfʊɐ̯t]) is a German sports club based in Frankfurt, Hesse, that is best known for its association football club, currently playing in the Bundesliga, the top tier of the German football league system. The club was founded in 1899 and have won one German championship, four DFB-Pokals and one UEFA Cup
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Bernd Wahler
Bernd Otto Wahler (born 24 May 1958 in Schnait) is a German businessman. He was president of VfB Stuttgart
VfB Stuttgart
between 22 July 2013 and 15 May 2016, his resignation due to Stuttgart's relegation to 2. Bundesliga in 2015-16 season. He played as a football player for the under-15-team and the under-17-team of VfB Stuttgart. Bernd Wahler
Bernd Wahler
joined Adidas
Adidas
in 1987. In 1997, he became managing director of Erima. From 1998 to 2000 Wahler was CEO of Bally Shoe
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Borussia Dortmund
Ballspielverein Borussia 09 e.V. Dortmund, commonly known as Borussia Dortmund
Dortmund
[boˈʁʊsi̯aː ˈdɔʁtmʊnt],[2] BVB, or simply Dortmund, is a German sports club based in Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia (Borussia is the Latin
Latin
equivalent of Prussia). The football team is part of a large membership-based sports club with more than 145,000 members,[3] making BVB the second largest sports club by membership in Germany. Dortmund
Dortmund
plays in the Bundesliga, the top tier of the German football league system. Dortmund
Dortmund
is one of the most successful clubs in German football history.[4][5] Borussia Dortmund
Dortmund
was founded in 1909 by eighteen football players from Dortmund
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Promotion And Relegation
In sports leagues, promotion and relegation is a process where teams are transferred between multiple divisions based on their performance for the completed season. The best-ranked team(s) in the lower division are promoted to the higher division for the next season, and the worst-ranked team(s) in the higher division are relegated to the lower division for the next season. In some leagues, playoffs or qualifying rounds are also used to determine rankings. This process can continue through several levels of divisions, with teams being exchanged between levels 1 and 2, levels 2 and 3, levels 3 and 4, and so on
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FIFA Eligibility Rules
As the governing body of association football, FIFA
FIFA
is responsible for maintaining and implementing the rules that determine whether an association football player is eligible to represent a particular country in officially recognised international competitions and friendly matches. In the 20th century, FIFA
FIFA
allowed a player to represent any national team, as long as the player held citizenship of that country. In 2004, in reaction to the growing trend towards naturalisation of foreign players in some countries, FIFA
FIFA
implemented a significant new ruling that requires a player to demonstrate a "clear connection" to any country they wish to represent
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German Cup
The DFB-Pokal
DFB-Pokal
[ˈdeː ʔɛf beː poˈkaːl] (until 1943 Tschammer-Pokal [tʃaːmɐ poˈkaːl]) or German Cup is a German knockout football cup competition held annually. Sixty-four teams participate in the competition, including all clubs from the Bundesliga
Bundesliga
and the 2. Bundesliga. It is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal
DFB-Pokal
is run by the German Football Association (DFB), and runs from August until June. The winner qualifies for the DFL-Supercup
DFL-Supercup
and the UEFA Europa League
UEFA Europa League
unless the winner already qualifies for the UEFA Champions League
UEFA Champions League
in the Bundesliga. The competition was founded in 1935, then called the Tschammer-Pokal. The first titleholder were 1. FC Nürnberg
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FC Augsburg
Fußball-Club Augsburg
Augsburg
1907 e. V., commonly known as FC Augsburg (German pronunciation: [ʔɛf t͡seː ˈʔaʊ̯ksbʊʁk]) or Augsburg, is a German football club based in Augsburg, Bavaria. FC Augsburg
Augsburg
play in the Bundesliga, the top tier of the German football league system. The team was founded as Fußball-Klub Alemania Augsburg
Augsburg
in 1907 and played as BC Augsburg
Augsburg
from 1921 to 1969. With over 12,200 members, it is the largest football club in Swabian Bavaria. FC Augsburg, which has long fluctuated between the second and third division, experienced a difficult time in the early 2000s, suffering relegation to the fourth division for two seasons. FCA recovered from this, returning to professional football in 2006
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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SC Jülich 1910
SC Jülich is a German association football club from the city of Jülich, North Rhine-Westphalia. The club distinguished itself by winning three consecutive German amateur football championships from 1969 to 1971[1] while part of the third division Amateurliga Mittelrhein. History[edit] The club was founded on 12 January 1910 as Fußball-Club Jülich through the merger of predecessors Jülicher Gymnasial Turn- und Spielverein, Alemannia Jülich, and Viktoria Jülich . GTSV was the successor to Fußball-Club Juliacum 1903 Jülich.[2] The team was later renamed Sport-Club Jülich and first came to note with an advance to the Verbandsliga Mittelrhein (III) following their title in the Landesliga Mittelrhein (IV) in 1966. They earned a third place result in their debut campaign before going on to win a string of three divisional titles
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Kit (association Football)
In association football, kit (also referred to as a strip or uniform) is the standard equipment and attire worn by players. The sport's Laws of the Game specify the minimum kit which a player must use, and also prohibit the use of anything that is dangerous to either the player or another participant. Individual competitions may stipulate further restrictions, such as regulating the size of logos displayed on shirts and stating that, in the event of a match between teams with identical or similar colours, the away team must change to different coloured attire. Footballers generally wear identifying numbers on the backs of their shirts. Originally a team of players wore numbers from 1 to 11, corresponding roughly to their playing positions, but at the professional level this has generally been superseded by squad numbering, whereby each player in a squad is allocated a fixed number for the duration of a season
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Away Colours
Away colours
Away colours
are a choice of coloured clothing used in team sports. They are required to be worn by one team during a game between teams that would otherwise wear the same colours as each other, or similar colours. This change prevents confusion for officials, players, and spectators. In most sports, it is the visiting or road team that must change – second-choice kits are commonly known as away kits or change kits in British English, and road uniforms in American English. Some sports leagues mandate that away teams must always wear an alternative kit, while others simply state that the two teams' colours should not match. In some sports, conventionally the home team has changed its kit (such as in rugby union and early association football). In most cases, a team wears its away kit only when its primary kit would clash with the colours of the home team
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Defender (association Football)
In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield player whose primary role is to prevent the opposing team from scoring goals. There are four types of defenders: centre-back, sweeper, full-back, and wing-back. The centre-back and full-back positions are essential in most modern formations
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Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Stuttgart
(/ˈʃtʊtɡɑːrt/ SHTUUT-gart;[4] German: [ˈʃtʊtɡaʁt] ( listen); Swabian: Schduagert, pronounced [ˈʒ̊d̥ua̯ɡ̊ɛʕd̥]; names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Stuttgart is located on the Neckar
Neckar
river in a fertile valley known locally as the " Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Cauldron." It lies an hour from the Swabian Jura
Swabian Jura
and the Black Forest. Its urban area has a population of 609,219,[5] making it the sixth largest city in Germany.[6] 2.7 million people live in the city's administrative region[7] and another 5.3 million people in its metropolitan area,[8] making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Germany
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