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Vernon Davis
Vernon Leonard Davis (born January 31, 1984) is an American football tight end for the Washington Redskins
Washington Redskins
of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Maryland. He was drafted by the San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
sixth overall in the 2006 NFL
NFL
Draft. Upon entering the league, Davis signed a five-year, $23 million deal that made him the highest paid tight end at the time. In 2009, Davis co-led the NFL
NFL
in touchdown receptions. In the 2011–12 NFL playoffs with the 49ers, Davis caught the game-winning touchdown pass from Alex Smith
Alex Smith
against the New Orleans Saints, which was referred to as "The Catch III"
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2004 Northern Illinois Huskies Football Team
The 2004 Northern Illinois Huskies football team during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. Northern Illinois competed as a member of the West Division of the Mid-American Conference (MAC). They were coached by Joe Novak. Schedule[edit]Date Time Opponent Site TV Result AttendanceSeptember 4 5:00 PM at No
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Rivals.com
Rivals.com is a network of websites that focus mainly on college football and basketball recruiting in the United States. The network was started in 1998 and currently employs more than 300 personnel.[3]Contents1 History 2 Schools 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Rivals.com was founded in 1998 by Jim Heckman in Seattle, Washington, with a cadre of outside investors.[4] Heckman was once the son-in-law of Don James, the former head football coach at the University of Washington, where Heckman attended school and was later involved in a recruiting scandal.[5] Initial deriving revenue solely from advertising, Rivals.com later employed a subscription fee of $10.00 per month to users for access to the latest recruiting news and to participate in various message boards dedicated to schools covered by the network
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College Football
College football
College football
is American football
American football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football
Canadian football
played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football
American football
rules first gained popularity in the United States. Unlike most other sports in North America, no minor league farm organizations exist in American or Canadian football. Therefore, college football is generally considered to be the second tier of American football
American football
in the United States and Canadian football
Canadian football
in Canada; one step ahead of high school competition, and one step below professional competition
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2005 Clemson Tigers Football Team
The 2005 Clemson Tigers football team represented Clemson University in the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Tommy Bowden and played their homes game at Memorial Stadium in Clemson, South Carolina. Season[edit] Clemson started off its season with wins over a ranked Texas A&M team and the Maryland Terrapins. However, Clemson then lost the following three games to Miami, Boston College, and Wake Forest. The losses to Miami and Boston College came in overtime. Clemson then rebounded to win the next two games against NC State and Temple. The next week, Clemson lost a close game to Georgia Tech. Clemson then closed out the regular season with three straight wins over Duke, ACC rival Florida State, and instate rival South Carolina. In the post-season, Clemson received an invitation to play in the 2005 Champs Sports Bowl against Colorado
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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New Orleans Saints
National Football League
National Football League
(1967–present)Eastern Conference (1967–1969)Capitol Division (1967; 1969) Century Division (1968) National Football Conference
Natio

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Carolina Panthers
National Football League
National Football League
(1995–present) National Football Conference
National Football Conference
(1995–present)
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Paul Public Charter School
Paul Public Charter School is a charter school in northwest Washington, D.C.. It is located at 5800 Eighth Street NW, at the intersection of Eighth and Olglethorpe Streets. The school opened its doors as a public charter junior high school in 2000. It has students from sixth through twelfth grade (intermediate school). Paul focuses on allowing its students to become M.E.R.I.T Scholars, which stands for Motivated, Educated, Responsible, Independent, Thinkers. In August 2014 broke ground for high school expansion expected to be finished May 2015.[citation needed] There are 675 students at Paul. Paul has 1% Asians and Pacific Islanders, 13.39% Hispanics, 84% African Americans, and 1% Caucasian.[citation needed] Paul is named for Edward A. Paul, the first principal of Washington High School from 1877-1888.[1] Paul was born in Haverill, MA in 1855 and graduated from high school in Lawrence, MA before graduating from Dartmouth College in 1876
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High School Football
High school
High school
football is gridiron football played by high school teams in the United States and Canada. It ranks among the most popular interscholastic sports in both countries. It is also popular amongst American High school
High school
teams in Europe. High school
High school
football began in the late 19th century, concurrent with the start of many college football programs. In the late 19th and early 20th century, many college and high school teams played against one another. Other traditions of high school football such as pep rallies, marching bands, mascots, and homecomings are mirrored from college football. No true minor league farm organizations exist in American football. Therefore, high school football is generally considered to be the third tier of American football
American football
in the United States, behind professional and college competition
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New York Jets
American Football League
American Football League
(1960–1969)Eastern Division (1960–1969) National Football League
National Football League
(1970–present)
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American Football
American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada[citation needed] and also known as gridiron,[nb 1] is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal
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Track & Field
Track and field
Track and field
is a sport which includes athletic contests established on the skills of running, jumping, and throwing.[1] The name is derived from the sport's typical venue: a stadium with an oval running track enclosing a grass field where the throwing and jumping events take place. Track and field
Track and field
is categorized under the umbrella sport of athletics, which also includes road running, cross country running, and race walking. The foot racing events, which include sprints, middle- and long-distance events, race walking and hurdling, are won by the athlete with the fastest time. The jumping and throwing events are won by the athlete who achieves the greatest distance or height. Regular jumping events include long jump, triple jump, high jump and pole vault, while the most common throwing events are shot put, javelin, discus and hammer
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100 Meters
The 100 metres, or 100-metre dash, is a sprint race in track and field competitions. The shortest common outdoor running distance, it is one of the most popular and prestigious events in the sport of athletics. It has been contested at the Summer Olympics
Summer Olympics
since 1896 for men and since 1928 for women.Play mediaWomen's 100M Final - 28th Summer Universiade 2015The reigning 100 m Olympic champion is often named "the fastest man in the world". The World Championships 100 metres
100 metres
has been contested since 1983
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High Jump
The high jump is a track and field event in which competitors must jump unaided over a horizontal bar placed at measured heights without dislodging it. In its modern most practised format, a bar is placed between two standards with a crash mat for landing. In the modern era, athletes run towards the bar and use the Fosbury Flop
Fosbury Flop
method of jumping, leaping head first with their back to the bar. Since ancient times, competitors have introduced increasingly effective techniques to arrive at the current form. The discipline is, alongside the pole vault, one of two vertical clearance events to feature on the Olympic athletics programme. It is contested at the World Championships in Athletics
World Championships in Athletics
and IAAF
IAAF
World Indoor Championships, and is a common occurrence at track and field meetings
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4 × 100 Metres Relay
The 4 × 100 metres relay or sprint relay is an athletics track event run in lanes over one lap of the track with four runners completing 100 metres each. The first runners must begin in the same stagger as for the individual 400 m race. A relay baton is carried by each runner. Prior to 2018, the baton had to be passed within a 20 m changeover box, preceded by a 10 metre acceleration zone. With a rule change effective November 1, 2017 that zone was modified to include the acceleration zone as part of the passing zone, making the entire zone 30 metres in length. The outgoing runner cannot touch the baton until it has entered the zone, the incoming runner cannot touch the baton after it has left the zone. The zone is usually marked in yellow, frequently using lines, triangles or chevrons. While the rule book specifies the exact positioning of the marks, the colors and style are only "recommended"
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