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Vermont Senate
Majority     Democratic (21)      Progressive (2)Minority     Republican (7)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Section 7, Legislative Department, Constitution of VermontSalary $693.74 per week plus per diem during sessionElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (30 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (30 seats)Redistricting Legislative controlMeeting placeState Senate Chamber, Vermont
Vermont
State House Montpelier, Vermont, U.S.Website Vermont
Vermont
State SenateThe Vermont
Vermont
Senate is the upper house of the Vermont
Vermont
General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont. The senate consists of 30 members
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List Of Counties In Vermont
There are fourteen counties in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont. These counties together contain 255 political units, or places, including 237 towns, 9 cities, 5 unincorporated areas, and 4 gores. Each county has a county seat, often referred to as a "shire town." In 1779, Vermont
Vermont
had two counties. The western side of the state was called Bennington County and the eastern was called Cumberland County.[1] In 1781, Cumberland County was separated into three counties in Vermont plus another county named Washington (not the same as the modern Washington County) that eventually became part of New Hampshire. Today's Washington County was known as Jefferson County from its creation in 1810 until it was renamed in 1814
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Constitution Of Vermont
The Constitution of the State of Vermont
Vermont
is the fundamental body of law of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont. It was adopted in 1793 following Vermont's admission to the Union in 1791 and is largely based upon the 1777 Constitution of the Vermont
Vermont
Republic which was ratified at Windsor in the Old Constitution House
Old Constitution House
and amended in 1786. At 8,295 words, it is the shortest U.S. state
U.S

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President Of The Senate
The President of the Senate
Senate
is a title often given to the presiding officer of a senate, and is the speaker of other assemblies. The senate president often ranks high in a jurisdiction's succession for its top executive office: for example, the President of the Senate of Nigeria
Nigeria
is second in line for succession to the presidency, after only the Vice President of the Federal Republic, while in France, which has no vice president, the Senate
Senate
President is first in line to succeed to the Presidential powers and duties.Contents1 Argentina 2 Australia 3 Barbados 4 Belgium 5 Belize 6 Brazil 7 Burundi 8 Cambodia 9 Canada 10 Chile 11 Colombia 12 Fiji 13 Danzig 14 France 15 Germany 16 Italy 17 Liberia 18 Malaysia 19 Mexico 20 Nigeria 21 Peru 22 Philippines 23 Poland 24 Puerto Rico 25 Romania 26 South Africa 27 Spain 28 Sri Lanka 29 Trinidad and Tobago 30 United States30.1 U.S
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Lieutenant Governor Of Vermont
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
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Upper House
An upper house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature), the other chamber being the lower house.[1] The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller and often has more restricted power than the lower house
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Cabinet (government)
A cabinet is a body of high-ranking state officials, typically consisting of the top leaders of the executive branch. They are usually called ministers, but in some jurisdictions are sometimes called secretaries. The functions of a cabinet are varied: in some countries it is a collegiate decision-making body with collective responsibility, while in others it may function either as a purely advisory body or an assisting institution to a decision making head of state or head of government. Cabinets are typically the body responsible for the day-to-day management of the government and response to sudden events, whereas the legislative and judicial branches work in a measured pace, in sessions according to lengthy procedures. In some countries, particularly those that use a parliamentary system (e.g., the UK), the Cabinet collectively decides the government's direction, especially in regard to legislation passed by the parliament
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Term Limit
A term limit is a legal restriction that limits the number of terms an officeholder may serve in a particular elected office. When term limits are found in presidential and semi-presidential systems they act as a method to curb the potential for monopoly, where a leader effectively becomes "president for life". This is intended to protect a democracy from becoming a de facto dictatorship. Sometimes, there is an absolute limit on the number of terms an officeholder can serve, while, in other cases, the restrictions are merely on the number of consecutive terms.Contents1 History1.1 Ancient 1.2 Modern2 Types 3 Notable examples3.1 Relaxed term limits 3.2 Tightened term limits 3.3 People who would have run afoul of modern term limits4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Ancient[edit] Term limits have a long history
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U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
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Minority Leader
In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the floor leader of the second largest caucus in a legislative body.[1] Given the two-party nature of the U.S. system, the minority leader is almost inevitably either a Republican or a Democrat. The position could be considered similar to that of the Leader of the Opposition in Parliamentary systems. In bicameral legislatures, the counterpart to the minority leader in the lower house is the Speaker, and the majority leader is hence only the second-most senior member of the majority caucus. Contrastingly, in upper houses the titular Speaker is frequently a separately elected officer such as a lieutenant governor or vice president. The minority leader is often assisted in his/her role by one or more whips, whose job is to enforce party discipline on votes deemed to be crucial by the party leadership and to ensure that members do not vote against the position of the party leaders
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Hinesburg, Vermont
Hinesburg is a town in Chittenden County, Vermont, United States. The town was named for Abel Hine, town clerk.[3] The population was 4,396 at the 2010 census.[4] The main settlement of Hinesburg in the center of town is a census-designated place (CDP), with a population of 658 at the 2010 census.[5]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Schools and libraries 4 Notable events 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] Hinesburg is located in southern Chittenden County, bordered by Addison County to the south
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Montpelier, Vermont
Montpelier (/mɒntˈpiːliər/)[3] is the capital city of the U.S. state of Vermont
Vermont
and the seat of Washington County. As the site of Vermont's state government, it is the least populous state capital in the United States.[4] The population was 7,855 at the 2010 Census. However, the daytime population swells to about 21,000, due to the large number of jobs within city limits.[5] The Vermont
Vermont
College of Fine Arts and New England Culinary Institute
New England Culinary Institute
are located in the municipality
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Majority Leader
In U.S. politics, the majority floor leader is a partisan position in a legislative body.[1] In the federal Congress, the role of the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives and the Majority Leader of the United States Senate differ slightly. In the United States Senate, the majority leader is the chief spokesperson for the majority party,[1] as the president of the Senate is also the Vice-President of the United States, and the President pro tempore, though technically a substitute for the president of the Senate, is in reality a largely ceremonial position (albeit powerful nonetheless, being third in line of succession to the presidency). In the United States House of Representatives, the majority leader is elected by U.S. Congressmen in the political party holding the largest number of seats in the House
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St. Johnsbury, Vermont
St. Johnsbury (known locally as "St. Jay")[1] is the shire town[4] (county seat[5]) of Caledonia County, Vermont, United States. The population was 7,603 at the 2010 census.[6] St. Johnsbury is located approximately 10 miles (16 km) northwest of the Connecticut River and 48 miles (77 km) south of the Canada-U.S. border. St. Johnsbury is the largest town by population in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont
Vermont
and has served as a commercial center for the region
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Burlington, Vermont
Burlington is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont
Vermont
and the seat of Chittenden County. It is located 45 miles (72 km) south of the Canada– United States
United States
border and 94 miles (151 km) south of Canada's second most populous municipality, Montreal. The city's population was 42,452 according to a 2015 U.S. census estimate.[7] It is the least populous municipality in the United States to be the most populous incorporated area in a state. A regional college town, Burlington is home to the University of Vermont
Vermont
(UVM) and Champlain College, a small private college. Vermont's largest hospital, the UVM Medical Center, is located within the city limits. The City
City
of Burlington also owns the state of Vermont's largest airport, the Burlington International Airport, in neighboring South Burlington
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Republican Party (United States)
The Republican Party, commonly referred to as the GOP (abbreviation for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being its historic rival, the Democratic Party. The party is named after republicanism, the dominant value during the American Revolution. Founded by anti-slavery activists, economic modernizers, ex Whigs and ex Free Soilers in 1854, the Republicans dominated politics nationally and in the majority of northern states for most of the period between 1860 and 1932.[16] The Republican Party originally championed classical liberal ideas, including anti-slavery and economic reforms.[17][18] The party was usually dominant over the Democrats during the Third Party System
Third Party System
and Fourth Party System. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
formed the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party after being rejected by the GOP and ran as a candidate
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