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Vermont House Of Representatives
Majority  Democratic (83)  Progressive (7)  Independent (7)Minority  Republican (53)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Section 7, Legislative Department, Constitution of VermontSalary $636/week + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016 (150 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (150 seats)Redistricting Legislative controlMeeting placeState House Chamber, Vermont
Vermont
State House Montpelier, Vermont, U.S.The Vermont
Vermont
House of Representatives is the lower house of the Vermont General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont. The House comprises 150 members, with each member representing around 4,100 citizens. Representatives are elected to a two-year term without term limits. Vermont
Vermont
had a unicameral legislature until 1836
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Lyndonville, Vermont
Lyndonville is a village in the town of Lyndon, in Caledonia County, Vermont, United States. Lyndonville's population was 1,207 at the 2010 census.[3] It is the closest community to Lyndon State College.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Government 4 Demographics 5 Economy5.1 Personal income 5.2 Industry 5.3 Tourism6 Education 7 Arts and culture 8 Notable people 9 Footnotes 10 External linksHistory[edit] In 1883, trustees purchased a hand fire engine from Franklin, New Hampshire, to start a fire fighting company. The fire department volunteers named themselves the "Tiger Fire Company No
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Milton, Vermont
Milton is a suburb in Chittenden County, Vermont, United States. The population was 10,352 at the 2010 census.[3] According to local legend, the town was named for the English poet John Milton, but the name most likely originated from William FitzWilliam, 4th Earl FitzWilliam, who held the title Viscount
Viscount
Milton and was a supporter of independence for the colonies during the American Revolution.[4] Milton has a municipal building, school system, library, police force, fire department, rescue squad, several churches, as well as civic and social organizations.[5]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Government4.1 Public safety5 Transportation5.1 Major highways6 Education 7 Businesses 8 In popular culture 9 Notable people 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Milton was chartered by Governor Benning Wentworth
Benning Wentworth
of New Hampshire on June 8, 1763
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Grand Isle, Vermont
Grand Isle is a town on Grand Isle in Grand Isle County, Vermont, United States. The population was 2,067 at the 2010 census.[3] A landing for the Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain
Transportation Company's ferry to Plattsburgh, New York, at Cumberland Head
Cumberland Head
is located on the western shore of Grand Isle at Gordon's Landing.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Government 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The town was originally named "Middle Hero" when it was subdivided from the town of "South Hero" in November 1798. In November 1810, the town was renamed "Grand Isle".[4] Geography[edit]Entering the town of Grand IsleThe town of Grand Isle occupies the northern half of South Hero Island, also known as "Grand Isle", in Lake Champlain. It is bordered to the south by the town of South Hero and to the north by the town of North Hero, both in Grand Isle County
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Majority Leader
In U.S. politics, the majority floor leader is a partisan position in a legislative body.[1] In the federal Congress, the role of the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives and the Majority Leader of the United States Senate differ slightly. In the United States Senate, the majority leader is the chief spokesperson for the majority party,[1] as the president of the Senate is also the Vice-President of the United States, and the President pro tempore, though technically a substitute for the president of the Senate, is in reality a largely ceremonial position (albeit powerful nonetheless, being third in line of succession to the presidency). In the United States House of Representatives, the majority leader is elected by U.S. Congressmen in the political party holding the largest number of seats in the House
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Bradford, Vermont
Bradford is a town in Orange County, Vermont, United States. The population was 2,797 at the 2010 census. Bradford is located on the county's eastern border, bordering both the Connecticut River
Connecticut River
and New Hampshire, and is a commercial center for some of its surrounding towns.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Education 5 Transportation 6 Sites of interest 7 Notable people 8 References 9 Works cited 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]View of library in c
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Brattleboro, Vermont
Brattleboro
Brattleboro
(/ˈbrætəlˌbəroʊ/),[4] originally Brattleborough, is a town in Windham County, Vermont, United States. The most populous municipality abutting Vermont's eastern border (the Connecticut River), Brattleboro
Brattleboro
is located about 10 miles north of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
state line, at the confluence of Vermont's West River and the Connecticut. In 2014, Brattleboro's population was estimated by the U.S. Census
Census
Bureau to be 11,765.[5] Marlboro College
Marlboro College
Center for Graduate and Professional Studies[6] and SIT Graduate Institute[7] are located in the town
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Lower House
A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.[1] Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power. The lower house typically is the larger of the two chambers, i.e. its members are more numerous
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Minority Leader
In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the floor leader of the second largest caucus in a legislative body.[1] Given the two-party nature of the U.S. system, the minority leader is almost inevitably either a Republican or a Democrat. The position could be considered similar to that of the Leader of the Opposition in Parliamentary systems. In bicameral legislatures, the counterpart to the minority leader in the lower house is the Speaker, and the majority leader is hence only the second-most senior member of the majority caucus. Contrastingly, in upper houses the titular Speaker is frequently a separately elected officer such as a lieutenant governor or vice president. The minority leader is often assisted in his/her role by one or more whips, whose job is to enforce party discipline on votes deemed to be crucial by the party leadership and to ensure that members do not vote against the position of the party leaders
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New Haven, Vermont
New Haven is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The population was 1,727 at the 2010 census.[3] In addition to the town center, New Haven contains the communities of Belden (sometimes called Belden Falls), Brooksville, New Haven Junction and New Haven Mills.Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Notable people 4 References 5 External linksGeography[edit] New Haven is located in north-central Addison County, in the Champlain Valley. It is bordered by Ferrisburgh and Monkton to the north, Bristol to the east, Middlebury to the south, Weybridge to the southwest, and Waltham to the northwest. The town of Addison, west of Weybridge and Waltham, touches New Haven at one corner. Otter Creek, one of the longest rivers in Vermont, forms part of the town's southwest border, with falls at Belden and Huntington Falls. The New Haven River, rising to the east in the Green Mountains, flows into Otter Creek at Brooksville. U.S. Route 7
U.S

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Minority Leader
In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the floor leader of the second largest caucus in a legislative body.[1] Given the two-party nature of the U.S. system, the minority leader is almost inevitably either a Republican or a Democrat. The position could be considered similar to that of the Leader of the Opposition in Parliamentary systems. In bicameral legislatures, the counterpart to the minority leader in the lower house is the Speaker, and the majority leader is hence only the second-most senior member of the majority caucus. Contrastingly, in upper houses the titular Speaker is frequently a separately elected officer such as a lieutenant governor or vice president. The minority leader is often assisted in his/her role by one or more whips, whose job is to enforce party discipline on votes deemed to be crucial by the party leadership and to ensure that members do not vote against the position of the party leaders
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Swanton (town), Vermont
Swanton is a town in Franklin County, Vermont. The population was 6,427 at the 2010 census.[1] The town includes the village of Swanton.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Missisiquoi Council Abenaki
Abenaki
Nation 5 Swans 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The town of Swanton was chartered in 1763 as one of the New Hampshire Grants by Benning Wentworth, the governor of the Province of New Hampshire
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Poultney, Vermont
Poultney is a town in Rutland County in the southwestern part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont. New York state is on its western border. Castleton, Vermont, is on its northern border. Poultney is home to Green Mountain College, a private liberal arts college with about 600 students. The Village of Poultney is entirely within the town. The town population was 3,432 at the 2010 census.[1]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Neighboring cities and towns3 Demographics 4 Sites of interest 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] One of the New Hampshire
New Hampshire
Grants, Poultney was charted on September 21, 1761, by Benning Wentworth, Royal Governor of New Hampshire, and named for William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath, a British politician and orator.[2] Poultney was first settled by Thomas Ashley and Ebenezer Allen
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Burlington, Vermont
Burlington is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Vermont
Vermont
and the seat of Chittenden County. It is located 45 miles (72 km) south of the Canada– United States
United States
border and 94 miles (151 km) south of Canada's second most populous municipality, Montreal. The city's population was 42,452 according to a 2015 U.S. census estimate.[7] It is the least populous municipality in the United States to be the most populous incorporated area in a state. A regional college town, Burlington is home to the University of Vermont
Vermont
(UVM) and Champlain College, a small private college. Vermont's largest hospital, the UVM Medical Center, is located within the city limits. The City
City
of Burlington also owns the state of Vermont's largest airport, the Burlington International Airport, in neighboring South Burlington
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Bristol, Vermont
Bristol is a town in Addison County, Vermont, United States. The town was founded June 26, 1762. The population was 3,894 at the 2010 census.[3] Main Street is home to most of the businesses of the town. The town is also home to the Lord's Prayer
Lord's Prayer
Rock.[4]Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Education 4 Media 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksGeography[edit] Bristol is in northeastern Addison County, at the western foot of the Green Mountains. The New Haven River, a tributary of Otter Creek, flows out of the mountains through the town center
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