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Verb
A verb, from the Latin
Latin
verbum meaning word, is a word (part of speech) that in syntax conveys an action (bring, read, walk, run, learn), an occurrence (happen, become), or a state of being (be, exist, stand). In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected (modified in form) to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice. A verb may also agree with the person, gender or number of some of its arguments, such as its subject, or object
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VERB (program)
VERB was a physical activity program of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of the United States Government. It included print, online, and television national paid advertising, running them on popular children's channels and popular children's magazines, for example. It ran from 2002 to 2006. The main goal of the VERB campaign was to increase and maintain physical activity among “tweens” (children ages 9–13). The campaign is based upon social marketing principles (produce, price, place and promotion) and culturally targets this age group. It encourages life style changes such as playing more and “trying new verbs.” [1] An evaluation of the program in 2004 found it to have an expansive reach. Among exposed children, 96% reported understanding of at least one key campaign message. Children who reported being aware of the VERB campaign engaged in 3.9 weekly sessions of free-time activity while children with no VERB awareness reported 3 sessions of physical activity
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Mandarin Chinese
Mandarin (/ˈmændərɪn, -drɪn/ ( listen); simplified Chinese: 官话; traditional Chinese: 官話; pinyin: Guānhuà; literally: "speech of officials") is a group of related varieties of Chinese spoken across most of northern and southwestern China. The group includes the Beijing
Beijing
dialect, the basis of Standard Mandarin or Standard Chinese. Because most Mandarin dialects are found in the north, the group is sometimes referred to as the Northern dialects (北方话; běifānghuà). Many local Mandarin varieties are not mutually intelligible
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Dependent-marking Language
A dependent-marking language has grammatical markers of agreement and case government between the words of phrases that tend to appear more on dependents than on heads. The distinction between head-marking and dependent-marking was first explored by Johanna Nichols in 1986,[1] and has since become a central criterion in language typology in which languages are classified according to whether they are more head-marking or dependent-marking. Many languages employ both head and dependent-marking, but some employ double-marking, and yet others employ zero-marking. However, it is not clear that the head of a clause has anything to do with the head of a noun phrase, or even what the head of a clause is.Contents1 In English 2 In German 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesIn English[edit] English has few inflectional markers of agreement and so can be construed as zero-marking much of the time
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Standard Average European
Standard Average European (SAE) is a concept introduced in 1939 by Benjamin Whorf
Benjamin Whorf
to group the modern Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
of Europe.[1] Whorf argued that these languages were characterized by a number of similarities including syntax and grammar, vocabulary and its use as well as the relationship between contrasting words and their origins, idioms and word order which all made them stand out from many other language groups around the world which do not share these similarities; in essence creating a continental sprachbund
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Noun Phrase
A noun phrase or nominal phrase (abbreviated NP) is a phrase which has a noun (or indefinite pronoun) as its head, or which performs the same grammatical function as such a phrase.[1] Noun phrases are very common cross-linguistically, and they may be the most frequently occurring phrase type. Noun phrases often function as verb subjects and objects, as predicative expressions, and as the complements of prepositions
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Todd Young
Todd Christopher Young (born August 24, 1972) is an American politician serving as the junior United States Senator from Indiana since 2017. From 2011 to 2017 he was the U.S. Representative for Indiana's 9th congressional district. Young is a member of the Republican Party. He was elected to the United States Senate
United States Senate
in the November 8, 2016, general election, succeeding retiring Republican Dan Coats.Contents1 Early life 2 Military career 3 Post-military career 4 Early political career 5 U.S. House of Representatives5.1 Elections5.1.1 2010 5.1.2 20125.2 Tenure 5.3 Sponsored legislation 5.4 Committee assignments6 U.S. Senate6.1 2016 election 6.2 Tenure 6.3 Committee assignments7 Political positions7.1 Gun law8 Personal life 9 Electoral history 10 References 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Young was born August 24, 1972 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the second of three children of Nancy R. (née Pierce) and Bruce H
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Mike Trout
Michael Nelson Trout (born August 7, 1991) is an American professional baseball center fielder for the Los Angeles Angels
Los Angeles Angels
of Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB). Trout is a six-time MLB All-Star, and received the American League
American League
(AL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) award in 2014 and 2016 (finishing second in the 2012, 2013 and 2015 votes). He throws and bats right-handed, stands 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m) tall, and weighs 235 pounds (107 kg). Trout was a first-round pick by the Angels in the 2009 MLB draft and made a brief major league appearance in 2011. He became a regular player for the Angels the subsequent season and won the 2012 AL Rookie of the Year Award unanimously. He is under contract with the Angels through 2020. Nicknamed "The Millville Meteor", Trout's MLB performances have received praise from both the mainstream media and sabermetricians
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Basque Language
Basque (/bæsk/ or /bɑːsk/;[4] Basque: euskara, IPA: [eus̺ˈkaɾa]) is the language spoken in the Basque country. Linguistically, Basque is unrelated to the other languages of Europe and indeed, as a language isolate, to any other known living language. The Basques
Basques
are indigenous to, and primarily inhabit, the Basque Country, a region that straddles the westernmost Pyrenees
Pyrenees
in adjacent parts of northern Spain
Spain
and southwestern France
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Voice (grammar)
In grammar, the voice of a verb describes the relationship between the action (or state) that the verb expresses and the participants identified by its arguments (subject, object, etc.). When the subject is the agent or doer of the action, the verb is in the active voice. When the subject is the patient, target or undergoer of the action, the verb is said to be in the passive voice. Voice is sometimes called diathesis.[2] For example, in the sentence:The cat ate the mouse.the verb "ate" is in the active voice. However, in the sentence:The mouse was eaten by the cat.the verbal phrase "was eaten" is passive. In the sentence:The hunter killed the bear.the verb "killed" is in the active voice, and the doer of the action is the "hunter"
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Subject (grammar)
The subject in a simple English sentence such as John runs, John is a teacher, or John was hit by a car is the person or thing about whom the statement is made, in this case 'John'. Traditionally the subject is the word or phrase which controls the verb in the clause, that is to say with which the verb agrees (John is but John and Mary are). If there is no verb, as in John - what an idiot!, or if the verb has a different subject, as in John - I can't stand him!, then 'John' is not considered to be the grammatical subject, but can be described as the 'topic' of the sentence. These definitions seem clear enough for simple sentences such as the above, but as will be shown in the article below, problems in defining the subject arise when an attempt is made to extend the definitions to more complex sentences and to languages other than English
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Null-subject Language
In linguistic typology, a null-subject language is a language whose grammar permits an independent clause to lack an explicit subject; such a clause is then said to have a null subject. Typically, null-subject languages express person, number, and/or gender agreement with the referent on the verb, rendering a subject noun phrase redundant. In the principles and parameters framework, the null subject is controlled by the pro-drop parameter, which is either on or off for a particular language. For example, in Italian the subject "she" can be either explicit or implicit:Maria non vuole mangiare. lit. Maria not wants [to-]eat, "Maria does not want to eat". Non vuole mangiare. lit
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Polish Language
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland
Poland
and is the native language of the Poles. It belongs to the Lechitic subgroup of the West Slavic languages.[8] Polish is the official language of Poland, but it is also used throughout the world by Polish minorities in other countries. There are over 55 million Polish language
Polish language
speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union. Its written standard is the Polish alphabet, which has 9 additions to the letters of the basic Latin script
Latin script
(ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż)
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Argument (linguistics)
In linguistics, an argument is an expression that helps complete the meaning of a predicate,[2] the latter referring in this context to a main verb and its auxiliaries. In this regard, the complement is a closely related concept. Most predicates take one, two, or three arguments. A predicate and its arguments form a predicate-argument structure. The discussion of predicates and arguments is associated most with (content) verbs and noun phrases (NPs), although other syntactic categories can also be construed as predicates and as arguments. Arguments must be distinguished from adjuncts. While a predicate needs its arguments to complete its meaning, the adjuncts that appear with a predicate are optional; they are not necessary to complete the meaning of the predicate.[3] Most theories of syntax and semantics acknowledge arguments and adjuncts, although the terminology varies, and the distinction is generally believed to exist in all languages
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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Grammatical Mood
In linguistics, grammatical mood (also mode) is a grammatical feature of verbs, used for signaling modality.[2][3]:p.181;[4] That is, it is the use of verbal inflections that allow speakers to express their attitude toward what they are saying (e.g. a statement of fact, of desire, of command, etc.). The term is also used more broadly to describe the syntactic expression of modality, that is, the use of verb phrases that do not involve inflexion of the verb itself. Mood is distinct from grammatical tense or grammatical aspect, although the same word patterns are used for expressing more than one of these meanings at the same time in many languages, including English and most other modern Indo-European languages. (See tense–aspect–mood for a discussion of this.) Some examples of moods are indicative, interrogative, imperative, subjunctive, injunctive, optative, and potential. These are all finite forms of the verb
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