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Vehicle Registration Plate
A VEHICLE REGISTRATION PLATE, also known as a NUMBER PLATE (British English ) or a LICENSE PLATE ( American English ), is a metal or plastic plate attached to a motor vehicle or trailer for official identification purposes. All countries require registration plates for road vehicles such as cars, trucks, and motorcycles. Whether they are required for other vehicles, such as bicycles, boats, or tractors, may vary by jurisdiction. The registration identifier is a numeric or alphanumeric ID that uniquely identifies the vehicle owner within the issuing region's vehicle register . In some countries, the identifier is unique within the entire country, while in others it is unique within a state or province. Whether the identifier is associated with a vehicle or a person also varies by issuing agency
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Bag Tag
BAG TAGS, also known as BAGGAGE TAGS, BAGGAGE CHECKS or LUGGAGE TICKETS, have traditionally been used by bus, train, and airline carriers to route checked luggage to its final destination. The passenger stub is typically handed to the passenger or attached to the ticket envelope: a) to aid the passenger in identifying their bag among similar bags at the destination baggage carousel ; b) as proof—still requested at a few airports—that the passenger is not removing someone else's bag from the baggage reclaim hall; and c) as a means for the passenger and carrier to identify and trace a specific bag that has gone astray and was not delivered at the destination. The carriers' liability is restricted to published tariffs and international agreements. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Invention * 1.2 Warsaw Convention * 1.3 Previous bag tags * 1.4 Current bag tags * 2 Identification * 3 References HISTORY Bag tag for a 1972 flight to Unalaska Airport on Reeve Aleutian Airways INVENTIONThe first "separable coupon ticket" was patented by John Michael Lyons of Moncton , New Brunswick on June 5, 1882. The ticket showed the issuing station, the destination, and a consecutive number for reference. The lower half of the ticket was given to the passenger, while the upper half, with a hole at the top, was inserted into a brass sleeve and then attached to the baggage by a strap. At some point, reinforced paper tags were introduced
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Jurisdiction
JURISDICTION (from the Latin
Latin
_ius, iuris_ meaning "law" and _dicere_ meaning "to speak") is the practical authority granted to a legal body to administer justice within a defined field of responsibility, e.g., Michigan tax law. In federations like the U.S., areas of jurisdiction apply to local, state , and federal levels; e.g. the court has jurisdiction to apply federal law. Colloquiallyit is used to refer to the geographical area to which such authority applies, e.g. the court has jurisdiction over all of Colorado. The legal term refers only to the granted authority, not to a geographical area. Jurisdiction
Jurisdiction
draws its substance from public international law , conflict of laws , constitutional law , and the powers of the executive and legislative branches of government to allocate resources to best serve the needs of society . CONTENTS* 1 International dimension * 1.1 Political issue * 1.2 International and municipal * 1.2.1 Law * 1.3 International * 1.4 Supranational * 1.5 National * 2 United States
United States
* 3 Colloquially * 4 Franchise jurisdiction * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONInternational laws and treaties provide agreements which nations agree to be bound to
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Golf Cart
A GOLF CART (called GOLF CAR in ANSI standard Z130.1, since "carts" are not self-propelled) is a small vehicle designed originally to carry two golfers and their golf clubs around a golf course or on desert trails with less effort than walking. Golf carts come in a wide range of formats and are more generally used to convey small numbers of passengers short distances at speeds less than 15 mph (24 km/h) per ANSI Standard z130.1 as originally manufactured. They are generally around 4 feet (1.2 m) wide × 8 feet (2.4 m) long × 6 feet (1.8 m) high and weigh 900 pounds (410 kg) to 1,000 pounds (450 kg). Most are powered by 4-stroke engines. The price of a golf cart can range anywhere from under US$1,000 to well over US$20,000 per cart, depending on several factors. These factors may include whether or not a fleet of carts is being purchased for a golf course or a country club , for example, and whether the carts are new or used. Other factors may include options such as equipment requirements, and how many people the cart is meant to transport. With the rise in popularity of golf carts, many golf clubs or country clubs offer storage and energy options to golf cart owners. This has led to the modification of golf carts to suit use at the particular golf course. Typical modification includes windshields, ball cleaners, cooler trays, upgraded motor or speed controller (to increase speed and/or torque), and lift kits
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Put-in-Bay, Ohio
PUT-IN-BAY is a village located on South Bass Island in Put-in-Bay Township , Ottawa County , Ohio , United States . The population was 138 at the 2010 census . The bay played a significant role in the War of 1812 as the location of the squadron of U.S. naval commander Oliver Hazard Perry , who sailed from the port on September 10, 1813 to engage a British squadron just north of the island in the Battle of Lake Erie . The village is a popular summer resort and recreational destination. Ferry and airline services connect the community with Catawba Island , Kelleys Island , Port Clinton , and Sandusky, Ohio . CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 History of name * 3 Demographics * 3.1 2010 census * 3.2 2000 census * 3.3 Education * 4 Climate * 5 Transportation * 5.1 Ohio state routes * 5.2 Airport * 6 Tourism * 7 Gallery * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 External links GEOGRAPHYPut-in-Bay is located 15 miles (24 km) northwest of Sandusky, at 41°39′11″N 82°49′3″W / 41.65306°N 82.81750°W / 41.65306; -82.81750 (41.653006, -82.817620). According to the United States Census Bureau , the village has a total area of 0.63 square miles (1.63 km2), of which 0.45 square miles (1.17 km2) is land and 0.18 square miles (0.47 km2) is water. HISTORY OF NAMEThe name "Put-in-Bay" originally only referred to the bay itself
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British English
BRITISH ENGLISH is the English language as spoken and written in the United Kingdom . Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective _wee_ is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland and Ireland , and occasionally Yorkshire , whereas _little_ is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken, so a uniform concept of British English is more difficult to apply to the spoken language. According to Tom McArthur in the _Oxford Guide to World English_, British English shares "all the ambiguities and tensions in the word 'British ' and as a result can be used and interpreted in two ways, more broadly or more narrowly, within a range of blurring and ambiguity". When distinguished from American English , the term "British English" is sometimes used broadly as a synonym for the various varieties of English spoken in some member states of the Commonwealth of Nations
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American English
AMERICAN ENGLISH (AME, AE, AMENG, USENG, EN-US ), sometimes called UNITED STATES ENGLISH or U.S. ENGLISH, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States . English is the most widely spoken language in the United States and is the common language used by the federal government, considered the _de facto _ language of the country because of its widespread use. English has been given official status by 32 of the 50 state governments. As an example, while both Spanish and English have equivalent status in the local courts of Puerto Rico , under federal law, English is the official language for any matters being referred to the United States district court for the territory. The use of English in the United States is a result of British colonization of the Americas . The first wave of English-speaking settlers arrived in North America during the 17th century, followed by further migrations in the 18th and 19th centuries. Since then, American English has developed into new dialects, in some cases under the influence of West African and Native American languages , German , Dutch , Irish , Spanish , and other languages of successive waves of immigrants to the United States
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Metal
A METAL (from Greek μέταλλον _métallon_, "mine, quarry, metal" ) is a material (an element , compound , or alloy ) that is typically hard, opaque , shiny, and has good electrical and thermal conductivity . Metals are generally malleable —that is, they can be hammered or pressed permanently out of shape without breaking or cracking—as well as fusible (able to be fused or melted) and ductile (able to be drawn out into a thin wire). About 91 of the 118 elements in the periodic table are metals; the others are nonmetals or metalloids . Some elements appear in both metallic and non-metallic forms. Astrophysicists use the term "metal" to collectively describe all elements other than hydrogen and helium , the simplest two, in a star. The star fuses smaller atoms, mostly hydrogen and helium, to make larger ones over its lifetime. In that sense, the metallicity of an object is the proportion of its matter made up of all heavier chemical elements, not just traditional metals. Many elements and compounds that are not normally classified as metals become metallic under high pressures; these are formed as metallic allotropes of non-metals . The strength and resilience of metals has led to their frequent use in high-rise building and bridge construction , as well as most vehicles, many home appliances , tools, pipes, non-illuminated signs and railroad tracks. Precious metals were historically used as coinage
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Plastic
_Note 1_: The use of this term instead of _polymer _ is a source of confusion and thus is not recommended. _Note 2_: This term is used in polymer engineering for materials often compounded that can be processed by flow. PLASTIC is material consisting of any of a wide range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic compounds that are malleable and so can be molded into solid objects. Plasticity is the general property of all materials which can deform irreversibly without breaking but, in the class of moldable polymers , this occurs to such a degree that their actual name derives from this ability. Plastics are typically organic polymers of high molecular mass , but they often contain other substances. They are usually synthetic, most commonly derived from petrochemicals , but many are made from renewable materials such as polylactic acid from corn or cellulosics from cotton linters. Due to their relatively low cost, ease of manufacture, versatility, and imperviousness to water, plastics are used in an enormous and expanding range of products, from paper clips to spaceships. They have already displaced many traditional materials, such as wood , stone , horn and bone , leather , paper , metal , glass , and ceramic , in most of their former uses. In developed countries, about a third of plastic is used in packaging and another third in buildings such as piping used in plumbing or vinyl siding
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Motor Vehicle
A MOTOR VEHICLE is a self-propelled road vehicle or off-road vehicle , commonly wheeled , that does not operate on rails , such as trains or trams and used for the transportation of passengers, or passengers and property. The vehicle propulsion is provided by an engine or motor, usually by an internal combustion engine , or an electric motor , or some combination of the two, such as hybrid electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids . For legal purposes motor vehicles are often identified within a number of vehicle classes including cars , buses , motorcycles , off-road vehicles , light trucks and regular trucks . These classifications vary according to the legal codes of each country. ISO 3833:1977 is the standard for road vehicles types, terms and definitions. Generally to avoid requiring handicapped persons from having to possess an operator's license to use one, or requiring tags and insurance, powered wheelchairs will be specifically excluded by law from being considered motor vehicles. As of 2010 there were more than one billion motor vehicles in use in the world excluding off-road vehicles and heavy construction equipment . Global vehicle ownership per capita in 2010 was 148 vehicles in operation per 1000 people. The United States
United States
has the largest fleet of motor vehicles in the world, with 239.8 million in 2010. Vehicle ownership per capita in the US is also the highest in the world with 769 vehicles in operation per 1000 people
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Trailer (vehicle)
A TRAILER is an unpowered vehicle towed by a powered vehicle. It is commonly used for the transport of goods and materials. Sometimes recreational vehicles , travel trailers , or mobile homes with limited living facilities, where people can camp or stay have been referred to as trailers. In earlier days, many such vehicles were towable trailers. CONTENTS * 1 United States * 2 Types of trailers * 2.1 Bicycle trailer * 2.2 Construction trailer * 2.3 Travel trailer * 2.4 Semi-trailer * 2.5 Full trailer * 2.6 Close-coupled trailer * 2.7 Motorcycle trailer * 2.8 Trailer winches * 2.9 Livestock trailer * 2.10 Boat trailer * 3 Hitching a trailer * 3.1 Ball and socket * 3.2 Fifth wheel and gooseneck * 3.3 Trailer jack * 4 Electrical components * 4.1 Brakes * 5 Stability * 6 See also * 6.1 List of types of trailers * 7 References * 8 External links UNITED STATES A truck pulling a semi-trailer using a trailer dolly . In the United States , the term is sometimes used interchangeably with travel trailer and mobile home , varieties of trailers and manufactured housing designed for human habitation. Their origins lay in utility trailers built in a similar fashion to horse-drawn wagons. A trailer park is an area where mobile homes are placed for habitation
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Unique Identifier
With reference to a given (possibly implicit) set of objects, a UNIQUE IDENTIFIER (UID) is any identifier which is guaranteed to be unique among all identifiers used for those objects and for a specific purpose. There are three main types of unique identifiers, each corresponding to a different generation strategy: * serial numbers , assigned incrementally or sequentially * random numbers , selected from a number space much larger than the maximum (or expected) number of objects to be identified. Although not really unique, some identifiers of this type may be appropriate for identifying objects in many practical applications and are, with abuse of language, still referred to as "unique" * names or codes allocated by choice which are forced to be unique by keeping a central registry such as the EPC Information Services .The above methods can be combined, hierarchically or singly, to create other generation schemes which guarantee uniqueness. In many cases, a single object may have more than one unique identifier, each of which identifies it for a different purpose. In relational databases , certain attributes of an entity that serve as unique identifiers are called primary keys
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Vehicle Register
The VEHICLE REGISTER in the United Kingdom is a database of motor vehicles . It is a legal requirement in the UK for most types of motor vehicle to be registered if they are to be used on the public road. All new and imported vehicles are required to be entered onto the register which is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) in Great Britain and by Driver "> * ^ Car Registrations in the British Isles Peter Robson ISBN 1-872686-30-3 * ^ Oates, John (20 January 2010). "DVLA makes £44m flogging drivers\' details". The Register. Retrieved 4 February 2010. * ^ Williams, Chris (28 September 2009). "DVLA pledges investigation over Castrol spy posters". The Register
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Car Model
An AUTOMOBILE MODEL (or CAR MODEL or MODEL OF CAR, and typically abbreviated to just "model") is a particular brand of vehicle sold under a marque by a manufacturer, usually within a range of models, usually of different sizes or capabilities. From an engineering point of view, a particular car model is usually defined and/or constrained by the use of a particular car chassis /bodywork combination or the same monocoque , although sometimes this is not the case, and the model represents a marketing segment. A model may also be referred to as a NAMEPLATE , specifically when referring to the product from the point of view of the manufacturer, especially a model over time. For example, the Chevrolet Suburban
Chevrolet Suburban
is the oldest automobile nameplate in continuous production, dating to 1934 (1935 model year), while the Chrysler New Yorker was (until its demise in 1996) the oldest North American car nameplate. "Nameplate" is also sometimes used more loosely, however, to refer to a brand or division of larger company (e.g., GMC), rather than a specific model. This engineering frame may have derivatives, giving rise to more than one body style for a particular car model. For example, the same model can be offered as a four-door sedan (saloon), a two-door coupé , a station wagon (estate), or even as a folding-roof convertible, all derived from essentially the same engineering frame. An example of this is the BMW 3-series
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Car Colour
The most popular car colours today are shades of grey: white , black , grey and silver , amounting to over 70% of the total world car production. Red , blue and brown /beige cars range between 6% and 9% each, while all other colours amount to less than 5%. Colour choice is subject to fluctuation and fashion, and historical trends shifted from dark neutral colours of early cars, through more vivid colours of 1950s and 1960s, back towards today's neutral colours. CONTENTS * 1 Most popular colours * 2 Proposed reasons * 3 Gender differences * 4 Future trends * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links MOST POPULAR COLOURSAmerican paint manufacturers PPG Industries (PPG) and DuPont (DP) both conduct annual surveys about car colour popularity worldwide. According to the 2012 surveys, white was the most popular car colour worldwide, followed by silver, grey and black; the highest discrepancies come between grey and silver, apparently because of ambiguity of the terms
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Engine
An ENGINE or MOTOR is a machine designed to convert one form of energy into mechanical energy . Heat engines burn a fuel to create heat , which is then used to create a force . Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion; pneumatic motors use compressed air and clockwork motors in wind-up toys use elastic energy . In biological systems, molecular motors , like myosins in muscles , use chemical energy to create forces and eventually motion
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