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Vehicle Armour
Military vehicles are commonly armoured (or armored; see spelling differences) to withstand the impact of shrapnel, bullets, missiles or shells, protecting the personnel inside from enemy fire. Such vehicles include armoured fighting vehicles like tanks, aircraft and ships. Civilian vehicles may also be armoured. These vehicles include cars used by reporters, officials and others in conflict zones or where violent crime is common, and presidential limousines. Civilian armoured cars are also routinely used by security firms to carry money or valuables to reduce the risk of highway robbery or the hijacking of the cargo. Armour
Armour
may also be used in vehicles to protect from threats other than a deliberate attack. Some spacecraft are equipped with specialised armour to protect them against impacts from micrometeoroids or fragments of space junk
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Carjacking
Carjacking
Carjacking
is a robbery in which the item taken over is a motor vehicle.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Studies 3 Prevention and response 4 Incidents by country4.1 South Africa 4.2 United States4.2.1 Federal Anti-Car Theft Act of 1992 4.2.2 Prevalence and statistical analysis 4.2.3 In particular cities 4.2.4 State law4.3 United Kingdom 4.4 Australia5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The word is a portmanteau of car and hijacking
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Jet Engine
A jet engine is a reaction engine discharging a fast-moving jet that generates thrust by jet propulsion. This broad definition includes airbreathing jet engines (turbojets, turbofans, ramjets, and pulse jets) and non-airbreathing jet engines (such as rocket engines). In general, jet engines are combustion engines. In common parlance, the term jet engine loosely refers to an internal combustion airbreathing jet engine. These typically feature a rotating air compressor powered by a turbine, with the leftover power providing thrust via a propelling nozzle — this process is known as the Brayton thermodynamic cycle. Jet aircraft
Jet aircraft
use such engines for long-distance travel. Early jet aircraft used turbojet engines which were relatively inefficient for subsonic flight. Modern subsonic jet aircraft usually use more complex high-bypass turbofan engines
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Armored Car (valuables)
An armored car (or armored cash transport car, security van) is an armored van or truck, used in transporting valuables, such as large quantities of money (especially for banks or retail companies). The armored car is typically a multifunctional vehicle designed to protect and ensure the wellbeing of the transported individuals and/or contents. Often, armored cars are bulletproof and can withstand extreme degrees of heat. These vehicles are mostly utilized by the military, but many companies such as Mercedes, Lexus, Toyota, Cadillac, Audi, and BMW
BMW
have created armored cars for civilian use, usually to protect valuables and dignitaries. Armored cars have an armored shell and cab, and typically are customized on a basic van or truck chassis. These vehicles are designed to resist attempts at robbery and hijacking
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Highway
A highway is any public or private road or other public way on land. It is used for major roads, but also includes other public roads and public tracks: It is not an equivalent term to controlled-access highway, or a translation for autobahn, autoroute, etc. In North American and Australian English, major roads such as controlled-access highways or arterial roads are often state highways (Canada: provincial highways). Other roads may be designated "county highways" in the US and Ontario. These classifications refer to the level of government (state, provincial, county) that maintains the roadway. In British English, "highway" is primarily a legal term
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Robbery
Robbery
Robbery
is the crime of taking or attempting to take anything of value by force, threat of force, or by putting the victim in fear. According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.[1] Precise definitions of the offence may vary between jurisdictions. Robbery
Robbery
is differentiated from other forms of theft (such as burglary, shoplifting, or car theft) by its inherently violent nature (a violent crime); whereas many lesser forms of theft are punished as misdemeanors, robbery is always a felony in jurisdictions that distinguish between the two. Under English law, most forms of theft are triable either way, whereas robbery is triable only on indictment
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Armoured Warfare
Armoured warfare, mechanised warfare or tank warfare is the use of armoured fighting vehicles in modern warfare
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Spacecraft
A spacecraft is a vehicle or machine designed to fly in outer space. Spacecraft
Spacecraft
are used for a variety of purposes, including communications, earth observation, meteorology, navigation, space colonization, planetary exploration, and transportation of humans and cargo. On a sub-orbital spaceflight, a spacecraft enters space and then returns to the surface, without having gone into an orbit. For orbital spaceflights, spacecraft enter closed orbits around the Earth
Earth
or around other celestial bodies. Spacecraft
Spacecraft
used for human spaceflight carry people on board as crew or passengers from start or on orbit (space stations) only, whereas those used for robotic space missions operate either autonomously or telerobotically. Robotic spacecraft used to support scientific research are space probes. Robotic spacecraft that remain in orbit around a planetary body are artificial satellites
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Micrometeoroid
A micrometeoroid is a tiny meteoroid; a small particle of rock in space, usually weighing less than a gram. A micrometeorite is such a particle that survives passage through the Earth's atmosphere
Earth's atmosphere
and reaches the Earth's surface.Contents1 Scientific interest 2 Effect on spacecraft operations 3 Footnotes 4 See also 5 External linksScientific interest[edit] See also: Cosmic dust Micrometeoroids are very small pieces of rock or metal broken off from larger chunks of rock and debris often dating back to the birth of the Solar System. Micrometeoroids are extremely common in space. Tiny particles are a major contributor to space weathering processes. When they hit the surface of the Moon, or any airless body (Mercury, the asteroids, etc.), the resulting melting and vaporization causes darkening and other optical changes in the regolith
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Space Debris
Space debris
Space debris
(also known as space junk, space waste, space trash, space litter or space garbage) is a term for the mass of defunct, artificially created objects in space, most notably in Earth orbit, such as old satellites and spent rocket stages. It includes the fragments from their disintegration, erosion and collisions. As of December 2016, five satellite collisions have resulted in generating space waste. As of 5 July 2016[update], the United States Strategic Command tracked a total of 17,852 artificial objects in orbit above the Earth,[1] including 1,419 operational satellites.[2] However, these are just objects large enough to be tracked
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Kevlar
Kevlar
Kevlar
is the registered trademark for a para-aramid synthetic fiber, related to other aramids such as Nomex
Nomex
and Technora. Developed by Stephanie Kwolek
Stephanie Kwolek
at DuPont
DuPont
in 1965,[1][2][3] this high-strength material was first commercially used in the early 1970s as a replacement for steel in racing tires. Typically it is spun into ropes or fabric sheets that can be used as such or as an ingredient in composite material components. Kevlar
Kevlar
has many applications, ranging from bicycle tires and racing sails to bulletproof vests, because of its high tensile strength-to-weight ratio; by this measure it is 5 times stronger than steel.[2] It is also used to make modern drumheads that withstand high impact
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Cast Steel
Steel casting is a specialized form of casting involving various types of steel. Steel castings are used when cast irons cannot deliver enough strength or shock resistance.[1] Examples of items that are steel castings include: hydroelectric turbine wheels, forging presses, gears, railroad truck frames, valve bodies, pump casings, mining machinery, marine equipment, turbocharger turbines and engine cylinder blocks.[1] Steel castings are categorized into two general groups: carbon steels and alloy steels.[1]Contents1 Steel castability 2 Machinability[2] 3 Damping ability 4 Impact and wear resistance 5 Steel casting alloys 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 BibliographySteel castability[edit] Steel is more difficult to cast than iron. It has a higher melting point and greater shrinkage rate, which requires consideration during mold design. Risers should be given more capacity to draw from as the metal cools and shrinks
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Gas Turbine
A gas turbine, also called a combustion turbine, is a type of continuous combustion, internal combustion engine. There are three main components:An upstream rotating gas compressor; A downstream turbine on the same shaft; A combustion chamber or area, called a combustor, in between 1. and 2. above.A fourth component is often used to increase efficiency (turboprop, turbofan), to convert power into mechanical or electric form (turboshaft, electric generator), or to achieve greater power to mass/volume ratio (afterburner). The basic operation of the gas turbine is a Brayton cycle
Brayton cycle
with air as the working fluid. Fresh atmospheric air flows through the compressor that brings it to higher pressure. Energy
Energy
is then added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it so the combustion generates a high-temperature flow
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Airframe
The airframe of an aircraft is its mechanical structure. It is typically considered to include fuselage, wings and undercarriage and exclude the propulsion system. Airframe
Airframe
design is a field of aerospace engineering that combines aerodynamics, materials technology and manufacturing methods to achieve balances of performance, reliability and cost.[1]Contents1 History1.1 First World War 1.2 Between World wars 1.3 Second World War 1.4 Postwar 1.5 Modern era2 Safety 3 See also 4 Notes and referencesHistory[edit]4 types of Airframe
Airframe
construction 1. Truss with canvas 2. Truss with corrugate plate 3. Monocoque
Monocoque
construction 4
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Turbine Blade
A turbine blade is the individual component which makes up the turbine section of a gas turbine or steam turbine. The blades are responsible for extracting energy from the high temperature, high pressure gas produced by the combustor. The turbine blades are often the limiting component of gas turbines.[1] To survive in this difficult environment, turbine blades often use exotic materials like superalloys and many different methods of cooling, such as internal air channels, boundary layer cooling, and thermal barrier coatings. Blade fatigue is a major source of failure in steam turbines and gas turbines. Fatigue is caused by the stress induced by vibration and resonance within the operating range of machinery
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Design
Design
Design
is the creation of a plan or convention for the construction of an object, system or measurable human interaction (as in architectural blueprints, engineering drawings, business processes, circuit diagrams, and sewing patterns).[1] Design
Design
has different connotations in different fields (see design disciplines below). In some cases, the direct construction of an object (as in pottery, engineering, management, coding, and graphic design) is also considered to use design thinking. Designing often necessitates considering the aesthetic, functional, economic, and sociopolitical dimensions of both the design object and design process. It may involve considerable research, thought, modeling, interactive adjustment, and re-design
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