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Vaughan Grylls
Vaughan Grylls
Vaughan Grylls
is a British artist, photographer, and author.[1] Known for his fine art photography and sculptures, Grylls first received recognition for his 1960s pun-sculptures and, later, for his 1980s photography and panoramic photo collages.[2] Grylls was the director of Kent Institute of Art & Design before co-founding the University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone & Rochester.[citation needed] He has work in various public collections including Unilever, Polaroid, the Arts Council of Wales,[citation needed] the Library of the Museum of Modern Art i
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Whitechapel Art Gallery
The Whitechapel
Whitechapel
Gallery is a public art gallery in Whitechapel
Whitechapel
on the north side of Whitechapel
Whitechapel
High Street, in the London
London
Borough of Tower Hamlets in the East End of London
London
and Central London. Designed by Charles Harrison Townsend, it was opened in 1901 as one of the first publicly funded galleries for temporary exhibitions in London, and it has a long track record for education and outreach projects, focused on local people
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Chelsea Arts Club
Chelsea
Chelsea
or Chelsey may refer to:Contents1 Places1.1 Australia 1.2 Canada 1.3 United Kingdom 1.4 United States2 Companies 3 Organisations3.1 Film and television 3.2 Music3.2.1 Bands 3.2.2 Albums 3.2.3 Songs4 Sports 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPlaces[edit] Australia[edit]Chelsea, VictoriaCanada[edit]Chelsea, Nova Scotia Chelsea, QuebecUnited Kingdom[edit]Chelsea, London Chelsea
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Williams College
Williams College
Williams College
is a private liberal arts college in Williamstown, Massachusetts, United States. It was established in 1793 with funds from the estate of Ephraim Williams, a colonist from the Province of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay who was killed in the French and Indian War
French and Indian War
in 1755. The college was ranked first in 2017 in the U.S. News & World Report's liberal arts ranking for the 15th consecutive year,[6][7] and third among liberal art colleges in the 2017 Forbes
Forbes
magazine ranking of America's Top Colleges.[8] Williams is on a 450-acre (1.8 km2) campus in Williamstown, in the Berkshires
Berkshires
in rural northwestern Massachusetts. The campus contains more than 100 academic, athletic, and residential buildings.[9] There are 349 voting faculty members, with a student-to-faculty ratio of 7:1
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University For The Creative Arts
The University for the Creative Arts
University for the Creative Arts
is a specialist art and design university in the south of England. It was formed in 2005 as University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone
Maidstone
and Rochester when the Kent Institute of Art and Design was merged into the Surrey
Surrey
Institute of Art & Design, which already had degree-awarding status;[4] both constituent schools had been formed by merging the local art schools, in Kent
Kent
and Surrey
Surrey
respectively. It was granted university status in 2008, and the name changed to the present one
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Christopher Frayling
Sir Christopher John Frayling (born 25 December 1946) is a British educationalist and writer, known for his study of popular culture.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Knighthood 4 Select bibliography4.1 Literature 4.2 History 4.3 Film 4.4 Education5 List of audio commentaries 6 Notes 7 External linksBiography[edit] Christopher Frayling
Christopher Frayling
was born in Hampton, a suburb of London,[1] in affluent circumstances.[2] After attending Repton School,[3] Frayling read history at Churchill College, Cambridge
Churchill College, Cambridge
and gained a PhD in the study of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. He was appointed a Fellow of the college in 2009. He taught history at the University of Bath
University of Bath
and was awarded an Honorary Degree (Doctor of Arts) from that University in 2003
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Royal College Of Art
The Royal College of Art
Art
(RCA) is a public research university in London, in the United Kingdom
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Sadler's Wells
Sadler's Wells Theatre
Sadler's Wells Theatre
is a performing arts venue in Clerkenwell, London, England located on Rosebery Avenue. The present-day theatre is the sixth on the site since 1683. It consists of two performance spaces: a 1,500 seat main auditorium and the Lilian Baylis
Lilian Baylis
Studio, with extensive rehearsal rooms and technical facilities also housed within the site. Sadler's Wells is renowned as one of the world's leading dance venues. As well as a stage for visiting companies, the theatre is also a producing house, with a number of associated artists and companies that produce original works for the theatre
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Rochester Cathedral
Rochester Cathedral, formally the Cathedral
Cathedral
Church of Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary, is an English church of Norman architecture
Norman architecture
in Rochester, Kent. The church is the cathedral of the Diocese
Diocese
of Rochester in the Church of England and the seat (cathedra) of the Bishop
Bishop
of Rochester, the second oldest bishopric in England after that of the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
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Sculpture
Sculpture
Sculpture
is the branch of the visual arts that operates in three dimensions. It is one of the plastic arts. Durable sculptural processes originally used carving (the removal of material) and modelling (the addition of material, as clay), in stone, metal, ceramics, wood and other materials but, since Modernism, there has been an almost complete freedom of materials and process
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Edward Allington
Edward Thomas Allington (24 June 1951 – 21 September 2017)[1] was an English artist and sculptor, best known for his part in the 1980s New British Sculpture movement.[2] Born at Troutbeck Bridge, Westmorland, Allington studied at Lancaster College of Art from 1968 to 1971, at the Central School of Art and Design in London from 1971 to 1974[3] and at the Royal College of Art from 1983 to 1984. He was a fellow at Exeter College of Art and Design 1975–77. He won the John Moores Liverpool Exhibition Prize in 1989, was Gregory Fellow in Sculpture at University of Leeds 1991–93 and Research Fellow in Sculpture at Manchester Metropolitan University in 1993. He received a fine art award to work at the British School at Rome in 1997.Deluxe vase made whilst a fellow at Exeter College of Art and Design in 1976His work was included in the group exhibition 'Objects and Sculpture' at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1981 and 'The Sculpture Show' at The Hayward Gallery 1983
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William Feaver
William Feaver (born 1 December 1942) is a British art critic, curator, artist and lecturer. From 1975–1998 he was the chief art critic of the Observer, and from 1994 a visiting professor at Nottingham Trent University. His book The Pitmen Painters inspired the play of the same name by Lee Hall.[1]Contents1 Education 2 Career as art critic 3 Exhibitions curated 4 Books published 5 Family 6 ReferencesEducation[edit] Feaver was educated at Nottingham High School
Nottingham High School
and Keble College, Oxford. After graduatiing from Oxford he became a teacher at Newcastle's Royal Grammar School (1965-71)[2] before being appointed the Sir James Knott Fellow at Newcastle University
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Amazon Standard Identification Number
The Amazon Standard Identification Number (ASIN) is a 10-character alphanumeric unique identifier assigned by Amazon.com
Amazon.com
and its partners for product identification within the Amazon organization.[1] Usage and structure[edit] Although ASINs used to be unique worldwide, global expansion has changed things so that ASINs are only guaranteed unique within a marketplace.[citation needed] The same product may be referred to by several ASINs though, and different national sites may use a different ASIN for the same product.[citation needed] In general, ASINs are likely to be different between the country sites unless they are for a class of product where the ASIN is based on an externally defined and internationally consistent identifier, such as ISBN
ISBN
for books.[citation needed] Each product sold on Amazon.com
Amazon.com
is given a unique ASIN
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