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Vaudeville
Vaudeville
Vaudeville
(/ˈvɔːdvɪl, -dəvɪl/; French: [vodvil]) is a theatrical genre of variety entertainment. It was especially popular in the United States
United States
and Canada
Canada
from the early 1880s until the early 1930s. A typical vaudeville performance was made up of a series of separate, unrelated acts grouped together on a common bill. Types of acts have included popular and classical musicians, singers, dancers, comedians, trained animals, magicians, strongmen, female and male impersonators, acrobats, illustrated songs, jugglers, one-act plays or scenes from plays, athletes, lecturing celebrities, minstrels, and movies. A vaudeville performer is often referred to as a "vaudevillian". Vaudeville
Vaudeville
developed from many sources, including the concert saloon, minstrelsy, freak shows, dime museums, and literary American burlesque
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Terminology
Terminology is the study of terms and their use. Terms are words and compound words or multi-word expressions that in specific contexts are given specific meanings—these may deviate from the meanings the same words have in other contexts and in everyday language. Terminology is a discipline that studies, among other things, the development of such terms and their interrelationships within a specialized domain. Terminology differs from lexicography, as it involves the study of concepts, conceptual systems and their labels (terms), whereas lexicography studies words and their meanings. Terminology is a discipline that systematically studies the "labelling or designating of concepts" particular to one or more subject fields or domains of human activity. It does this through the research and analysis of terms in context for the purpose of documenting and promoting consistent usage
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Celebrities
Celebrity
Celebrity
refers to the fame and public attention accorded by the mass media to individuals or groups or, occasionally, animals, but is usually applied to the persons or groups of people (celebrity couples, families, etc.) themselves who receive such a status of fame and attention. Celebrity
Celebrity
status is often associated with wealth (commonly referred to as fame and fortune), while fame often provides opportunities to earn revenue. Successful careers in sports and entertainment are commonly associated with celebrity status,[1][2] while political leaders often become celebrities
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Kirksville, Missouri
Kirksville is a city in and the county seat of Adair County, Missouri, United States.[1] Located in the Benton Township, its population was 17,505 at the 2010 census.[6] Kirksville is home to two colleges: Truman State University
Truman State University
and A.T
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Upper Manhattan
Upper Manhattan
Manhattan
denotes the most northern region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Middle Class
The middle class is a class of people in the middle of a social hierarchy. In Weberian socio-economic terms, the middle class is the broad group of people in contemporary society who fall socio-economically between the working class and upper class. The common measures of what constitutes middle class vary significantly among cultures. One of the narrowest definitions limits it to those in the middle fifth of the nation's income ladder
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Impresario
An impresario (from the Italian impresa, "an enterprise or undertaking")[1] is a person who organizes and often finances concerts, plays, or operas, performing a role similar to that of an artist manager or a film or television producer. The term originated in the social and economic world of Italian opera, in which from the mid-18th century to the 1830s, the impresario was the key figure in the organization of a lyric season.[2] The owners of the theatre, usually noble amateurs, charged the impresario with hiring a composer (until the 1850s operas were expected to be new) and the orchestra, singers, costumes and sets, all while assuming considerable financial risk. In 1786 Mozart satirized the stress and emotional mayhem in a single-act farce Der Schauspieldirektor
Der Schauspieldirektor
(The Impresario)
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Nick Tosches
Nick Tosches (/ˈtɑːʃəs/; born October 17[1] or 23,[2] 1949) is an American journalist, novelist, biographer, and poet. His 1982 biography of Jerry Lee Lewis, Hellfire, was praised by Rolling Stone magazine as "the best rock and roll biography ever written."[3][4]Contents1 Life 2 Bibliography2.1 Biographies 2.2 Fiction and poetry 2.3 Journalism 2.4 Collections 2.5 Interviews3 Discography 4 Film and television 5 Podcast 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Tosches was born in Newark, New Jersey
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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James Burke (science Historian)
James Burke (born 22 December 1936) is a British broadcaster, science historian, author, and television producer, who is known, among other things, for his documentary television series Connections (1978), and for its more philosophically oriented companion series, The Day the Universe Changed (1985), which is about the history of science and technology. The Washington Post
The Washington Post
called him "one of the most intriguing minds in the Western world".[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Knowledge Web 3 Connections app 4 Predictions 5 Television credits 6 Books 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Burke was born in Derry, Northern Ireland, and was educated at Maidstone Grammar School
Maidstone Grammar School
and at Jesus College, Oxford, where he earned an M.A. degree in Middle English
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North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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Freak Show
A freak show is an exhibition of biological rarities, referred to in popular culture as "freaks of nature." Typical features would be physically unusual humans, such as those uncommonly large or small, those with both male and female secondary sexual characteristics, people with other extraordinary diseases and conditions, and performances that are expected to be shocking to the viewers. Heavily tattooed or pierced people have sometimes been seen in freak shows, as have attention-getting physical performers such as fire-eating and sword-swallowing acts.Contents1 History 2 The American Museum 3 Tom Norman 4 Dime Museum 5 Circus 6 Disability 7 Historical timeline 8 Modern freak shows 9 In popular culture 10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksHistory[edit] In the mid-16th century, freak shows became popular pastimes in England.[1] Deformities began to be treated as objects of interest and entertainment, and the crowds flocked to see them exhibited
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Film
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry
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