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Vacation
A vacation or holiday is a leave of absence from a regular occupation, or a specific trip or journey, usually for the purpose of recreation or tourism. People often take a vacation during specific holiday observances, or for specific festivals or celebrations. Vacations are often spent with friends or family[1]. A person may take a longer break from work, such as a sabbatical, gap year, or career break. The concept of taking a vacation is a recent invention, and has developed through the last two centuries. Historically, the idea of travel for recreation was a luxury that only wealthy people could afford (see Grand Tour). In the Puritan
Puritan
culture of early America, taking a break from work for reasons other than weekly observance of the Sabbath was frowned upon. However, the modern concept of vacation was led by a later religious movement encouraging spiritual retreat and recreation
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NPR
National Public Radio
Radio
(usually shortened to NPR, stylized as npr) is an American privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization based in Washington DC. It serves as a national syndicator to a network of over 1,000 public radio stations in the United States.[2] NPR
NPR
produces and distributes news and cultural programming. Individual public radio stations are not required to broadcast all NPR
NPR
programs; most broadcast a mix of NPR
NPR
programs, content from rival providers American Public Media, Public Radio
Radio
International, Public Radio Exchange and WNYC
WNYC
Studios, and locally produced programs
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Upstate New York
Upstate New York
Upstate New York
is the portion of the American state of New York lying north of the New York metropolitan area
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Commonwealth Of Nations
The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
of Nations[2] (formerly the British Commonwealth),[3][1] also known as simply the Commonwealth, is an intergovernmental organisation of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.[4] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
operates by intergovernmental consensus of the member states, organised through the Commonwealth Secretariat and non-governmental organisations, organised through the Commonwealth
Commonwealth
Foundation.[5] The Commonwealth
Commonwealth
dates back to the mid-20th century with the decolonisation of the British Empire
British Empire
through increased self-governance of its territories
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Canadians
Canadians
Canadians
(French: Canadiens / Canadiennes) are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical, or cultural. For most Canadians, several (or all) of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian. Canada
Canada
is a multilingual and multicultural society home to people of many different ethnic, religious and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World
Old World
immigrants and their descendants. Following the initial period of French and then the much larger British colonization, different waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-indigenous peoples took place over the course of nearly two centuries and continue today
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Public Holiday
A public holiday, national holiday or legal holiday is a holiday generally established by law and is usually a non-working day during the year. Sovereign nations and territories observe holidays based on events of significance to their history, such as the National Day. For example, Australians
Australians
celebrate Australia Day. They vary by country and may vary by year. With 36 days a year, Nepal is the country with the highest number of public holidays but it observes six working days a week. India
India
ranks second with 21 national holidays, followed by Colombia
Colombia
and the Philippines
Philippines
at 18 each. Likewise, China
China
and Hong Kong
Hong Kong
enjoy 17 public breaks a year.[1] Some countries (e.g
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Rockefellers
The Rockefeller family (/ˈrɒkəfɛlər/) is an American industrial, political, and banking family that owns one of the world's largest fortunes. The fortune was initially made in the US petroleum industry during the late 19th and early 20th centuries by John D
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Collis Potter Huntington
Collis Potter Huntington
Collis Potter Huntington
(October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900)[2] was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker) who built the Central Pacific Railroad as part of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad. Huntington then helped lead and develop other major interstate lines such as the Southern Pacific Railroad
Southern Pacific Railroad
and the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway (C&O), which he was recruited to help complete. The C&O, completed in 1873, fulfilled a long-held dream of Virginians of a rail link from the James River at Richmond to the Ohio River Valley
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Adirondacks
The Adirondack Mountains
Adirondack Mountains
/ædɪˈrɒndæk/ form a massif in northeastern New York, United States. Its boundaries correspond to the boundaries of Adirondack Park. The mountains form a roughly circular dome, about 160 miles (260 km) in diameter and about 1 mile (1,600 m) high. The current relief owes much to glaciation.Contents1 History 2 Geology 3 Ecology 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]1876 map of the Adirondacks, showing many of the now obsolete names for many of the peaks, lakes, and communitiesThe earliest written use of the name, spelled Rontaks, was in 1724 by the French missionary Joseph-François Lafitau. He defined it as tree eaters. In the Mohawk language, Adirondack means porcupine, an animal that may eat bark. The Mohawks had no written language at the time so Europeans have used various phonetic spellings
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Upper-class
The upper class in modern societies is the social class composed of the wealthiest members of society, who also wield the greatest political power.[1] According to this view, the upper class is generally distinguished by immense wealth which is passed on from generation to generation.[2][unreliable source?] Prior to the 20th century, the nomenclature aristocracy was widely used.[3] Because the upper classes of a society may no longer rule the society in which they are living, they are often referred to as the old upper classes and they are often culturally distinct from the newly rich middle classes that tend to dominate public life in modern social democracies.[citation needed] According to the latter view held by the traditional upper classes, no amount of individual wealth or fame would make a person from an undistinguished background into a member of the upper class as one must be born into a family of that class and raised in a particular manner so as to understand and share upper
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Hungarian Language
Hungarian ( magyar nyelv (help·info)) is a Finno-Ugric language spoken in Hungary
Hungary
and several neighbouring countries. It is the official language of Hungary
Hungary
and one of the 24 official languages of the European Union. Outside Hungary
Hungary
it is also spoken by communities of Hungarians
Hungarians
in the countries that today make up Slovakia, western Ukraine, central and western Romania
Romania
(Transylvania and Partium), northern Serbia
Serbia
(Vojvodina), southern Poland[citation needed], northern Croatia, and northern Slovenia
Slovenia
due to the effects of the Treaty of Trianon, which resulted in many ethnic Hungarians
Hungarians
being displaced from their homes and communities in the former territories of the Austro-Hungarian Empire
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Books
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Disaster
A disaster is a serious disruption, occurring over a relatively short time, of the functioning of a community or a society involving widespread human, material, economic or environmental loss and impacts, which exceeds the ability of the affected community or society to cope using its own resources.[1][2] In contemporary academia, disasters are seen as the consequence of inappropriately managed risk. These risks are the product of a combination of both hazards and vulnerability
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