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VHS
The Video
Video
Home System[1][2] (VHS)[3] is a standard for consumer-level analog video recording on tape cassettes. Developed by Victor Company of Japan (JVC) in the early 1970s, it was released in Japan in late 1976 and in the United States in early 1977. From the 1950s, magnetic tape video recording became a major contributor to the television industry, via the first commercialized video tape recorders (VTRs). At that time, the devices were used only in expensive professional environments such as television studios and medical imaging (fluoroscopy). In the 1970s, videotape entered home use, creating the home video industry and changing the economics of the television and movie businesses. The television industry viewed videocassette recorders (VCRs) as having the power to disrupt their business, while television users viewed the VCR as the means to take control of their hobby.[4] In the 1970s and early 1980s, there was a format war in the home video industry
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Phillips Head
A screw drive is a system used to turn a screw.[1][2] At a minimum, it is a set of shaped cavities and protrusions on the screw head that allows torque to be applied to it. Usually, it also involves a mating tool, such as a screwdriver, that is used to turn it. The following heads are categorized based on commonality, with some of the less-common drives being classified as "tamper-resistant". Most heads come in a range of sizes, typically distinguished by a number, such as "Phillips #00" or " Torx
Torx
T5"
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Consumerization
Consumerization is the reorientation of product and service designs to focus on (and market to) the end user as an individual consumer, in contrast with an earlier era of only organization-oriented offerings (designed solely for business-to-business or business-to-government sales). Technologies whose first commercialization was at the inter-organization level thus have potential for later consumerization. The emergence of the individual consumer as the primary driver of product and service design is most commonly associated with the IT industry, as large business and government organizations dominated the early decades of computer usage and development
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Kenjiro Takayanagi
Kenjiro Takayanagi
Kenjiro Takayanagi
(高柳 健次郎, Takayanagi Kenjirō, January 20, 1899 in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka – July 23, 1990 in Yokosuka) was a Japanese engineer and a pioneer in the development of television.[1] Although he failed to gain much recognition in the West, he built the world's first all-electronic television receiver, and is referred to as "the father of Japanese television".Contents1 Career 2 Honors 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit]A recreation of Takayanagi's pioneering experiment, on display at the NHK
NHK
Broadcasting Museum in Atagoyama, TokyoIn 1925, Takayanagi began research on television after reading about the new technology in a French magazine. He developed a system similar to that of John Logie Baird, using a Nipkow disk
Nipkow disk
to scan the subject and generate electrical signals
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VX (videocassette Format)
VX or vx may refer to: Science and technology[edit]VX (nerve agent), a neurotoxic chemical warfare agent VX (videocassette format), an early consumer videocassette format produced by Panasonic Yaesu VX series, compact amateur radio handheld transceiversTransportation[edit]vx, an airplane's best angle of climb airspeed; see V speeds Holden Commodore (VX), a model of GM Holden's Commodore car ACES Colombia
ACES Colombia
(IATA code VX), a defunct airline Virgin America
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Magnetic Media
Magnetic storage or magnetic recording is the storage of data on a magnetized medium. Magnetic storage uses different patterns of magnetisation in a magnetisable material to store data and is a form of non-volatile memory. The information is accessed using one or more read/write heads. As of 2017[update], magnetic storage media, primarily hard disks, are widely used to store computer data as well as audio and video signals. In the field of computing, the term magnetic storage is preferred and in the field of audio and video production, the term magnetic recording is more commonly used. The distinction is less technical and more a matter of preference
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Ministry Of International Trade And Industry
The Ministry of International Trade and Industry (通商産業省 Tsūshō-sangyō-shō or MITI) was one of the most powerful agencies of the Government of Japan. At the height of its influence, it effectively ran much of Japanese industrial policy, funding research and directing investment. In 2001, its role was taken over by the newly created Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry
(METI).Contents1 History 2 Agencies 3 Deputy ministers 4 See also 5 Sources 6 External linksHistory[edit] MITI was created with the split of the Ministry of Commerce and Industry in May 1949 and given the mission for coordinating international trade policy with other groups, such as the Bank of Japan, the Economic planning
Economic planning
Agency, and the various commerce-related cabinet ministries. At the time it was created, Japan was still recovering from the economic disaster of World War II
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Akihabara
Akihabara
Akihabara
(Japanese: 秋葉原) is a common name for the area around Akihabara Station
Akihabara Station
in the Chiyoda ward of Tokyo, Japan. Administratively, the area called Akihabara
Akihabara
mainly belongs to the Sotokanda district (外神田), and the far-western part of Kanda-Sakumachō
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Consumer Confusion
Consumer
Consumer
confusion is a state of mind that leads to consumers making imperfect purchasing decisions or lacking confidence in the correctness of their purchasing decisions.[1]Contents1 Confusion 2 Causes2.1 Choice overload 2.2 Similarity 2.3 Lack of information 2.4 Information overload 2.5 Lack of consistency3 Law 4 ReferencesConfusion[edit] Confusion occurs when a consumer fails to correctly understand or interpret products and services.[2] This, in turn, leads to them making imperfect purchasing decisions. This concept is important to marketeers because consumer confusion may result in reduced sales, reduced satisfaction with products and difficulty communicating effectively with the consumer
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Television Studio
A television studio, also called a television production studio, is an installation room in which video productions take place, either for the recording of live television to video tape, or for the acquisition of raw footage for post-production. The design of a studio is similar to, and derived from, movie studios, with a few amendments for the special requirements of television production. A professional television studio generally has several rooms, which are kept separate for noise and practicality reasons. These rooms are connected via intercom, and personnel will be divided among these workplaces.Contents1 Studio
Studio
floor 2 Production-control room 3 Master control
Master control
room 4 Other facilities 5 See also 6 References Studio
Studio
floor[edit] The studio floor is the actual stage on which the actions that will be recorded and viewed take place
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Open Standard
An open standard is a standard that is publicly available and has various rights to use associated with it, and may also have various properties of how it was designed (e.g. open process). There is no single definition and interpretations vary with usage. The terms open and standard have a wide range of meanings associated with their usage. There are a number of definitions of open standards which emphasize different aspects of openness, including the openness of the resulting specification, the openness of the drafting process, and the ownership of rights in the standard
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Analog Recording
Analog recording
Analog recording
(Greek, ana is "according to" and logos "relationship") is a technique used for the recording of analog signals which, among many possibilities, allows analog audio and analog video for later playback. Analog audio recording began with mechanical systems such as the phonautograph and phonograph. Later, electronic techniques such as wire recording and tape recorder were developed. Analog recording
Analog recording
methods store signals as a continuous signal in or on the media. The signal may be stored as a physical texture on a phonograph record, or a fluctuation in the field strength of a magnetic recording
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General Electric
General Electric
General Electric
(GE) is an American multinational conglomerate incorporated in New York[5] and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts.[2] As of 2016, the company operates through the following segments: aviation, current, digital, energy connections, global research, healthcare, lighting, oil and gas, power, renewable energy, transportation, and capital which cater to the needs of financial services, medical devices, life sciences, pharmaceutical, automotive, software development and engineering industries.[6] In 2017, GE ranked among the Fortune 500
Fortune 500
as the thirteenth-largest firm in the U.S
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Technical Standard
A technical standard is an established norm or requirement in regard to technical systems. It is usually a formal document that establishes uniform engineering or technical criteria, methods, processes and practices. In contrast, a custom, convention, company product, corporate standard, and so forth that becomes generally accepted and dominant is often called a de facto standard. A technical standard may be developed privately or unilaterally, for example by a corporation, regulatory body, military, etc. Standards can also be developed by groups such as trade unions, and trade associations. Standards organizations
Standards organizations
often have more diverse input and usually develop voluntary standards: these might become mandatory if adopted by a government (i.e
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Feature Film
A feature film is a film (also called a motion picture, movie, or just film) with a running time long enough to be considered the principal or sole film to fill a program. The notion of how long this should be has varied according to time and place. According to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the American Film
Film
Institute, and the British Film
Film
Institute, a feature film runs for at least 40 minutes, while the Screen Actors Guild
Screen Actors Guild
holds that it is 80 minutes or longer. Most feature films are between 70 and 210 minutes long. The first dramatic feature film was the 60-minute The Story of the Kelly Gang (1906, Australia)[1]. The first (proto)-feature-length adaptation was Les Misérables (1909, U.S.)
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Content Format
A content format is an encoded format for converting a specific type of data to displayable information. Content formats are used in recording and transmission to prepare data for observation or interpretation.[1][2] This includes both analog and digitized content. Content formats may be recorded and read by either natural or manufactured tools and mechanisms. In addition to converting data to information, a content format may include the encryption and/or scrambling of that information.[3] Multiple content formats may be contained within a single section of a storage medium (e.g. track, disk sector, computer file, document, page, column) or transmitted via a single channel (e.g. wire, carrier wave) of a transmission medium. With multimedia, multiple tracks containing multiple content formats are presented simultaneously. Content formats may either be recorded in secondary signal processing methods such as a software container format (e.g
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