HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

University Of Birmingham
The University                                       College scarvesCollege of Arts and Law                             College of Social Sciences                               College of Life and Environmental Sciences                         College of Engineering and Physical Sciences                   College of Medical and Dental Sciences                                 Affiliations Universitas 21 Universities UK EUA ACU Sutton 13 Russell Group<
[...More...]

"University Of Birmingham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
[...More...]

"School Colors" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chancellor (education)
A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus. In most Commonwealth and former Commonwealth nations, the chancellor is usually a ceremonial non-resident head of the university. In such institutions, the chief executive of a university is the vice-chancellor, who may carry an additional title, such as "president & vice-chancellor". The chancellor may serve as chairman of the governing body; if not, this duty is often held by a chairman who may be known as a pro-chancellor. In many countries, the administrative and educational head of the university is known as the president, principal or rector. In the United States, the head of a university is most commonly a university president. In U.S
[...More...]

"Chancellor (education)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Universities UK
Universities UK
Universities UK
is an advocacy organisation for universities in the United Kingdom. It began life as the Committee of Vice-Chancellors and Principals of the Universities of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(CVCP) in the nineteenth century when there were informal meetings involving vice-chancellors of a number of universities and principals of university colleges. The current president is Janet Beer, vice-chancellor of the University of Liverpool. The current Chief Executive is Alistair Jarvis, who took up this role in August 2017.[1]Contents1 History 2 Mission 3 Admissions and social mobility 4 Advice regarding segregation 5 Efficiency and effectiveness 6 Health 7 EU referendum 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] In 1918 the first consultative meeting of all vice-chancellors was held. At that time, the committee consisted of just twenty-two universities and university colleges
[...More...]

"Universities UK" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Escutcheon (heraldry)
Heraldry
Heraldry
portalv t eIn heraldry, an escutcheon (/ɪˈskʌtʃən/) is a shield that forms the main or focal element in an achievement of arms. The word is used in two related senses. First, as the shield on which a coat of arms is displayed. Escutcheon shapes are derived from actual shields used by knights in combat, and thus have varied and developed by region and by era. As this shape has been regarded as a war-like device appropriate to men only, British ladies customarily bear their arms upon a lozenge, or diamond-shape, while clergymen and ladies in continental Europe bear theirs on a cartouche, or oval. Other shapes are in use, such as the roundel commonly used for arms granted to Aboriginal Canadians
Aboriginal Canadians
by the Canadian Heraldic
Heraldic
Authority. Second, a shield can itself be a charge within a coat of arms
[...More...]

"Escutcheon (heraldry)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
[...More...]

"Postgraduate Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
[...More...]

"Undergraduate Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ex Officio
This page lists English translations of notable Latin
Latin
phrases, such as veni vidi vici and et cetera. Some of the phrases are themselves translations of Greek phrases, as Greek rhetoric and literature reached its peak centuries before the rise of ancient Rome.This list covers the letter E. See List of Latin
Latin
phrases for the main list.List of Latin
Latin
phrasesA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z fullReferencesE[edit]Latin Translation Notese causa ignota of unknown cause Often used in medicine when the underlying disease causing a symptom is not known. Cf. idiopathic.e pluribus unum out of many, one Literally, out of more (than one), one. Used on many U.S. coins and inscribed on the Capitol. Also used as the motto of S.L. Benfica
[...More...]

"Ex Officio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Visitor
A visitor, in English and Welsh law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution, often a charitable institution set up for the perpetual distribution of the founder's alms and bounty, who can intervene in the internal affairs of that institution. Those with such visitors are mainly cathedrals, chapels, schools, colleges, universities, and hospitals. Many visitors hold their role ex officio, by serving as the British sovereign, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Lord Chancellor, the Lord President of the Council, the Lord Chief Justice, or the bishop of a particular diocese. Others can be appointed in various ways, depending on the constitution of the organization in question. Bishops are usually the visitors to their own cathedrals. The Queen usually delegates her visitatorial functions to the Lord Chancellor
[...More...]

"Visitor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
QS World University Rankings
is an annual publication of university rankings by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). Previously known as Times Higher Education–QS World University Rankings, the publisher had collaborated with Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
magazine (THE) to publish its international league tables from 2004 to 2009 before both started to announce their own versions
[...More...]

"QS World University Rankings" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vice-chancellor
A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus. In most Commonwealth and former Commonwealth nations, the chancellor is usually a ceremonial non-resident head of the university. In such institutions, the chief executive of a university is the vice-chancellor, who may carry an additional title, such as "president & vice-chancellor". The chancellor may serve as chairman of the governing body; if not, this duty is often held by a chairman who may be known as a pro-chancellor. In many countries, the administrative and educational head of the university is known as the president, principal or rector. In the United States, the head of a university is most commonly a university president. In U.S
[...More...]

"Vice-chancellor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Association Of Commonwealth Universities
The Association of Commonwealth Universities
Association of Commonwealth Universities
(ACU) was established in 1913, and has over 500 member institutions in over 50 countries across the Commonwealth. It is the world’s oldest international network of universities and its mission is to promote and support excellence in higher education for the benefit of individuals and societies throughout the commonwealth and beyond. While it is the oldest university network, it represents the future – it has a combined population of 3 billion, mainly under the age of 30. Commonwealth countries.[2] Drawing on the collective experience and expertise, the ACU seeks to address issues in international higher education through a range of projects, networks, and events
[...More...]

"Association Of Commonwealth Universities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
(THE), formerly The Times
The Times
Higher Education Supplement (THES), is a weekly magazine based in London, reporting specifically on news and issues related to higher education. It is the United Kingdom's leading publication in its field.[1]Contents1 Publication history 2 Times Higher Education
Times Higher Education
World University Rankings 3 Awards 4 References 5 External linksPublication history[edit] From its first issue, in 1971, until 2008, The Times
The Times
Higher Education Supplement (THES) was published in newspaper format and was born out of, and affiliated with, The Times
The Times
newspaper. On 10 January 2008, it was relaunched as a magazine. It is published by TES Global, which until October 2005 was a division of Rupert Murdoch's News International. The magazine is edited by John Gill
[...More...]

"Times Higher Education" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pounds Sterling
3p, 4p, 6p,[1] 25p, £5, Sovereign (British coin), £20, £100, £500 (Silver Kilo), £1,000 (Gold Kilo)[2]DemographicsOfficial user(s) United Kingdom9 British territories British Antarctic Territory   Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
pound)   Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(alongside Gibraltar
Gibraltar
pound)   Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
(Tristan da Cunha; alongside Saint Helena pound
Saint Helena pound
in Saint Helena
Saint Helena
and Ascension)   South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands pound)   British Indian Ocean Territory
British Indian Ocean Territory
(de jure,
[...More...]

"Pounds Sterling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pound Sterling
3p, 4p, 6p,[1] 25p, £5, Sovereign (British coin), £20, £100, £500 (Silver Kilo), £1,000 (Gold Kilo)[2]DemographicsOfficial user(s) United Kingdom9 British territories British Antarctic Territory   Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
pound)   Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(alongside Gibraltar
Gibraltar
pound)   Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
(Tristan da Cunha; alongside Saint Helena pound
Saint Helena pound
in Saint Helena
Saint Helena
and Ascension)   South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands pound)   British Indian Ocean Territory
British Indian Ocean Territory
(de jure,
[...More...]

"Pound Sterling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.