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University Of California
Coordinates: 37°48′08″N 122°16′17″W / 37.802168°N 122.271281°W / 37.802168; -122.271281 University
University
of CaliforniaMotto Fiat lux
Fiat lux
(Latin)Motto in EnglishLet there be lightType
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Congregational
Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. In the United States and the United Kingdom, many Congregational churches claim their descent from Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian and English separatist Robert Browne in 1582.[1] Ideas of nonconforming Protestants during the Puritan
Puritan
Reformation
Reformation
of the Church of England
Church of England
laid foundation for these churches. In England, the early Congregationalists were called Separatists or Independents to distinguish them from the similarly Calvinistic Presbyterians, whose churches embrace a polity based on the governance of elders
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Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
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Land-grant University
A land-grant university (also called land-grant college or land-grant institution) is an institution of higher education in the United States designated by a state to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. The Morrill Acts funded educational institutions by granting federally controlled land to the states for them to sell, to raise funds, to establish and endow "land-grant" colleges. The mission of these institutions as set forth in the 1862 Act is to focus on the teaching of practical agriculture, science, military science and engineering (though "without excluding... classical studies"), as a response to the industrial revolution and changing social class.[1][2] This mission was in contrast to the historic practice of higher education to focus on an abstract liberal arts curriculum
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Morrill Land-Grant Acts
The Morrill Land-Grant Acts
Morrill Land-Grant Acts
are United States
United States
statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges in U.S. states
U.S. states
using the proceeds of federal land sales. The Morrill Act of 1862 (7 U.S.C. § 301 et seq.) was enacted during the American Civil War and the Morrill Act of 1890 (the Agricultural College Act of 1890 (26 Stat. 417, 7 U.S.C. § 321 et seq.)) expanded this model.Contents1 Passage of original bill 2 Land-grant colleges 3 Expansion 4 Agricultural experiment stations and cooperative extension service 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksPassage of original bill[edit]Justin Smith MorrillFor 20 years prior to the first introduction of the bill in 1857, there was a political movement calling for the creation of agriculture colleges
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University
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Discipline (academia)
An academic discipline or academic field is a branch of knowledge. It incorporates expertise, people, projects, communities, challenges, studies, inquiry, and research areas that are strongly associated with a given scholastic subject area or college department. For example, the branches of science are commonly referred to as the scientific disciplines, e.g. physics, mathematics, and biology. Individuals associated with academic disciplines are commonly referred to as experts or specialists
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Faculty (division)
A faculty is a division within a university or college comprising one subject area, or a number of related subject areas.[1] In American usage such divisions are generally referred to as colleges (e.g., "college of arts and sciences") or schools (e.g., "school of business"), but may also mix terminology (e.g., Harvard University
University
has a "faculty of arts and sciences" but a "law school").Contents1 Overview 2 Faculty of Art2.1 Course of study3 Faculty of Classics 4 Faculty of Commerce 5 Faculty of Economics 6 Faculty of Education6.1 Other faculties7 Faculty of E
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United States Department Of Energy
The United States
United States
Department of Energy
Energy
(DOE) is a cabinet-level department of the United States
United States
Government concerned with the United States' policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation's nuclear weapons program, nuclear reactor production for the United States
United States
Navy, energy conservation, energy-related research, radioactive waste disposal, and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics; the Human Genome Project
Human Genome Project
originated in a DOE initiative.[3] DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S
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Graduate School
A graduate school (sometimes shortened as grad school) is a school that awards advanced academic degrees (i.e. master's and doctoral degrees) with the general requirement that students must have earned a previous undergraduate (bachelor's) degree[1][2] with a high grade point average. A distinction is typically made between graduate schools (where courses of study vary in the degree to which they provide training for a particular profession) and professional schools, which offer specialized advanced degrees in professional fields such as medicine, nursing, business, engineering, speech-language pathology, or law. The distinction between graduate schools and professional schools is not absolute, as various professional schools offer graduate degrees (e.g., some nursing schools offer a master's degree in nursing). Also, some graduate degrees train students for a specific profession (e.g
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Higher Education
Higher education
Higher education
(also called post-secondary education, third level or tertiary education) is an optional final stage of formal learning that occurs after completion of secondary education. Often delivered at universities, academies, colleges, seminaries, conservatories, and institutes of technology, higher education is also available through certain college-level institutions, including vocational schools, trade schools, and other career colleges that award academic degrees or professional certifications. Tertiary education
Tertiary education
at non-degree level is sometimes referred to as further education or continuing education as distinct from higher education. The right of access to higher education is mentioned in a number of international human rights instruments
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U.S. State
A state is a constituent political entity of the United States. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States federal government. Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside.[3] State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody)
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Alumnus
An alumnus (/əˈlʌmnəs/; masculine, plural alumni /əˈlʌmnaɪ/), an alumna (/əˈlʌmnə/; feminine, plural alumnae /əˈlʌmniː/), or an alumnum (/əˈlʌmnəm/; neuter, plural alumna /əˈlʌmnə/) is a former student, and commonly a graduate of a university.[1][2] An alumnus can also be a former member, employee, contributor, or inmate, as well as a former student.[2][3]Contents1 Etymology 2 Usage 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksEtymology[edit] The Latin
Latin
noun alumnus means “foster son” or “pupil” and is derived from the verb alere "to nourish".[4] T
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Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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