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Universal Priesthood
The universal priesthood or the priesthood of all believers is a foundational concept of Christianity
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Neo-charismatic Movement
The Neo-charismatic (also third-wave charismatic or hypercharismatic) movement is a movement within evangelical protestant Christianity which places emphasis on the use of charismata (or spiritual gifts) such as glossolalia, prophecy, divine healing, and divine revelation, which are believed to be given to them by the Holy Spirit. The Neo-charismatic movement is considered to be the "third wave" of the charismatic Christian tradition which began with Pentecostalism
Pentecostalism
(the "first wave"), and was furthered by the evangelical charismatic movement (the "second wave")
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Paleo-orthodoxy
Paleo-orthodoxy (from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
παλαιός "ancient" and Koine Greek ὀρθοδοξία "correct belief") is a Protestant Christian theological movement of the late 20th and early 21st centuries which focuses on the consensual understanding of the faith among the Ecumenical councils and Church Fathers
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Evangelicalism
Evangelicalism
Evangelicalism
(/ˌiːvænˈdʒɛlɪkəlˌɪzəm, ˌɛvən-/), evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism,[a] is a worldwide, crossdenominational movement within Protestant
Protestant
Christianity which maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel
Gospel
consists of the doctrine of salvation by grace through faith in Jesus
Jesus
Christ's atonement.[1][2] Evangelicals believe in the centrality of the conversion or the "born again" experience in receiving salvation, in the authority of the Bible
Bible
as God's revelation to humanity, and in spreading the Christian message
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Charismatic Movement
The Charismatic Movement
Charismatic Movement
is the international trend of historically mainstream Christian congregations adopting beliefs and practices similar to Pentecostalism. Fundamental to the movement is the use of spiritual gifts (charismata). Among Protestants, the movement began around 1960. Among Roman Catholics, it originated around 1967.Contents1 History 2 Beliefs 3 Denominations influenced3.1 Anglicanism 3.2 Evangelicalism 3.3 Lutheranism 3.4 Methodism 3.5 Calvinism 3.6 Adventism 3.7 Roman Catholicism 3.8 Eastern Orthodoxy4 Theologians and scholars 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Pentecostalism
Pentecostalism
began in the early twentieth century. Its doctrinal distinctive involved a dramatic encounter with God termed baptism with the Holy Spirit
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Epistle To The Hebrews
The Epistle
Epistle
to the Hebrews, or Letter to the Hebrews, or in the Greek manuscripts, simply To the Hebrews ( Πρὸς Έβραίους)[1] is one of the books of the New Testament. The text is traditionally attributed to Paul the Apostle, but doubt on Pauline authorship is reported by Eusebius,[2] and modern biblical scholarship considers its authorship unknown,[3] perhaps written in deliberate imitation of the style of Paul.[4][5] Scholars of Greek consider its writing to be more polished and eloquent than any other book of the New Testament. The book has earned the reputation of being a masterpiece.[6] It has also been described as an intricate New Testament
New Testament
book.[7] Scholars believe it was written for Jewish Christians
Jewish Christians
who lived in Jerusalem.[6] Its purpose was to exhort Christians
Christians
to persevere in the face of persecution
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Arminianism
Arminianism
Arminianism
is based on theological ideas of the Dutch Reformed theologian Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
(1560–1609) and his historic supporters known as Remonstrants. His teachings held to the five solae of the Reformation, but they were distinct from particular teachings of Martin Luther, Huldrych Zwingli, John Calvin, and other Protestant Reformers. Jacobus Arminius
Jacobus Arminius
(Jakob Harmenszoon) was a student of Theodore Beza
Theodore Beza
(Calvin's successor) at the Theological University of Geneva
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Book Of Revelation
The Book
Book
of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse
Apocalypse
of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation or Apocalypse (and often misquoted as Revelations), is a book of the New Testament that occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Its title is derived from the first word of the text, written in Koine Greek: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation" (before title pages and titles, books were commonly known by their first words, as is also the case of the Hebrew Five Books of Moses
Five Books of Moses
(Torah)). The Book
Book
of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament
New Testament
canon (although there are short apocalyptic passages in various places in the Gospels and the Epistles).[a] The author names himself in the text as "John", but his precise identity remains a point of academic debate
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Puritans
The Puritans
Puritans
were English Reformed
Reformed

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Neo-orthodoxy
Neo-orthodoxy, in Christianity, also known as theology of crisis and dialectical theology,[1][2] was a theological movement developed in the aftermath of the First World War. The movement was largely a reaction against doctrines of 19th-century liberal theology and a reevaluation of the teachings of the Reformation.[3] Karl Barth
Karl Barth
is the leading figure associated with the movement
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Christian Fundamentalism
Christian fundamentalism
Christian fundamentalism
began in the late 19th and early 20th centuries among British and American Protestants[1][2] as a reaction to theological liberalism and cultural modernism. Fundamentalists argued that 19th-century modernist theologians had misinterpreted or rejected certain doctrines, especially biblical inerrancy, that they viewed as the fundamentals of the Christian faith.[3] Fundamentalists are almost always described as having a literal interpretation of the Bible
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Holiness Movement
The Holiness movement
Holiness movement
involves a set of beliefs and practices which emerged from 19th-century Methodism. A number of Evangelical
Evangelical
Christian denominations, parachurch organizations, and movements emphasize those beliefs as central doctrine. The movement is Wesleyan-Arminian in theology,[1] and is defined by its emphasis on John Wesley's doctrine of a second work of grace leading to Christian
Christian
perfection
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Liberal Christianity
Liberal Christianity, also known as liberal theology, covers diverse philosophically and biblically informed religious movements and ideas within Christianity
Christianity
from the late 18th century onward. Liberal does not refer to Progressive Christianity
Christianity
or to a political philosophy but to the philosophical and religious thought that developed and grew as a consequence of the Enlightenment. Liberal Christianity, broadly speaking, is a method of biblical hermeneutics, an undogmatic method of understanding God through the use of scripture by applying the same modern hermeneutics used to understand any ancient writings, symbols and scriptures. Liberal Christianity
Christianity
did not originate as a belief structure, and as such was not dependent upon any Church dogma or creedal doctrine. Unlike conservative varieties of Christianity, liberalism has no unified set of propositional beliefs
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Nondenominational Christianity
Nondenominational (or non-denominational) Christianity
Christianity
consists of churches which typically distance themselves from the confessionalism or creedalism of other Christian
Christian
communities[1] by calling themselves non-denominational. Often founded by individual pastors, they have little affiliation with historic denominations, but typically adhere to evangelical Protestantism.[2][3][4] There is no identifiable standard among such congregations. Nondenominational church congregations may establish a functional denomination by means of mutual recognition of or accountability to other congregations and leaders with commonly held doctrine, policy, and worship without formalizing external direction or oversight in such matters. Some nondenominational churches explicitly reject the idea of a formalized denominational structure as a matter of principle, holding that each congregation is better off being autonomous
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House Church
A house church or home church is a label used to describe a group of Christians who regularly gather for worship in private homes. The group may be part of a larger Christian body, such as a parish, but some have been independent groups that see the house church as the primary form of Christian community. Sometimes these groups meet because the membership is small, and a home is the most appropriate place to assemble, as in the beginning phase of the British New Church Movement. Sometimes this meeting style is advantageous because the group is a member of a Christian congregation which is otherwise banned from meeting as is the case in China. Some recent Christian writers have supported the view that the Christian Church
Christian Church
should meet in houses, and have based the operation of their communities around multiple small home meetings
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First Peter
The First Epistle
Epistle
of Peter, usually referred to simply as First Peter and often written 1 Peter, is a book of the New Testament. The author presents himself as Peter the Apostle, and, following Roman Catholic tradition, the epistle has been held to have been written during his time as bishop of Rome or Bishop
Bishop
of Antioch, though neither title is used in the epistle. The text of the letter states that it was written from Babylon. The letter is addressed to various churches in Asia Minor suffering religious persecution.Contents1 Authorship 2 Audience 3 Outline 4 Context4.1 Social discrimination of Christians 4.2 Official persecution of Christians5 The Harrowing of Hell 6 See also 7 Notes 8 External linksAuthorship[edit] Main article: Authorship of the Petrine epistles The authorship of 1 Peter has traditionally been attributed to the Apostle Peter because it bears his name and identifies him as its author (1:1)
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