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United States Presidential Election Debates
During presidential elections in the United States, it has become customary for the main candidates (almost always the candidates of the two largest parties, currently the Democratic Party and the Republican Party) to engage in a debate. The topics discussed in the debate are often the most controversial issues of the time, and arguably elections have been nearly decided by these debates (e.g., Nixon vs. Kennedy). Candidate debates are not constitutionally mandated, but it is now considered a de facto election process.[1] The debates are targeted mainly at undecided voters; those who tend not to be partial to any political ideology or party.[2] Presidential debates are held late in the election cycle, after the political parties have nominated their candidates. The candidates meet in a large hall, often at a university, before an audience of citizens
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Edward P. Morgan
Edward Paddock Morgan (June 23, 1910 – January 27, 1993) was an American journalist and writer who reported for newspapers, radio, and television media services including ABC, CBS
CBS
networks, and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). A native of Walla Walla, Washington, Morgan began his news career with The Seattle Star
The Seattle Star
in 1932. He worked in print journalism for two decades, for United Press International, The Chicago Daily News, and Collier's Weekly
Collier's Weekly
before joining CBS
CBS
as a radio and TV reporter. From 1955 to 1967, Morgan broadcast an evening radio program of news and commentary, " Edward P. Morgan and the News," that won him the George Foster Peabody Award, broadcasting's most venerable honor, in 1956. In 1956, Morgan was based in New York City
New York City
and working for the ABC Radio Network
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Eleanor Roosevelt
Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
Eleanor Roosevelt
(/ˈɛlɪnɔːr ˈroʊzəvɛlt/; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American politician, diplomat and activist.[1] She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States, having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office,[1] and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations
United Nations
General Assembly from 1945 to 1952.[2][3] President Harry S. Truman
Harry S. Truman
later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements.[4] Roosevelt was a member of the prominent American Roosevelt and Livingston families and a niece of President Theodore Roosevelt.[3] She had an unhappy childhood, having suffered the deaths of both parents and one of her brothers at a young age
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Primary Election
A primary election is the process by which the general public can indicate their preference for a candidate in an upcoming general election or by-election, thus narrowing the field of candidates. Primaries are used in various countries throughout the world
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Adlai Stevenson II
Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (/ˈædleɪ/; February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American lawyer, politician, and diplomat, noted for his intellectual demeanor, eloquent public speaking, and promotion of progressive causes in the Democratic Party. Stevenson served in numerous positions in the federal government during the 1930s and 1940s, including the Agricultural Adjustment Administration
Agricultural Adjustment Administration
(AAA), Federal Alcohol Administration, United States
United States
Department of the Navy, and the United States
United States
Department of State. In 1945, he served on the committee that created the United Nations, and he was a member of the initial U.S. delegations to the UN
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Estes Kefauver
Carey Estes Kefauver
Estes Kefauver
(/ˈɛstɪs ˈkiːfɔːvər/;[1] July 26, 1903 – August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. A member of the Democratic Party, he served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1939 to 1949 and in the Senate from 1949 until his death from a ruptured aortic aneurysm in Bethesda, Maryland, in 1963. After leading a much-publicized investigation into organized crime in the early 1950s, he twice sought his party's nomination for President of the United States. In 1956, he was selected by the Democratic National Convention to be the running mate of presidential nominee Adlai Stevenson. Still holding his U.S. Senate seat after the Stevenson–Kefauver ticket lost to the Eisenhower–Nixon ticket in 1956, Kefauver was named chair of the U.S
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Student Government Association
A students' union, student government, free student union, student senate, students' association, guild of students, or government of student body is a student organization present in many colleges, universities, and high schools. In higher education, the students' union is often accorded its own building on the campus, dedicated to social, organizational activities, representation, and academic support of the membership. In the United States, student union often only refers to a physical building owned by the university with the purpose of providing services for students without a governing body. This building is also referred to as a student activity center, although the Association of College Unions International (largely US-based) has hundreds of campus organizational members
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University Of Maryland
Coordinates: 38°59′15″N 76°56′24″W / 38.98750°N 76.94000°W / 38.98750; -76.94000University of Maryland, College ParkFormer names Maryland
Maryland
Agricultural College (1856–1916) Maryland
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Baltimore Sun
The Baltimore Sun
The Baltimore Sun
is the largest general-circulation daily newspaper based in the American state of Maryland
Maryland
and provides coverage of local and regional news, events, issues, people, and industries.[3] Founded in 1837, it is owned by tronc (formerly known as Tribune Publishing).Contents1 History 2 Editions2.1 Daily 2.2 Sunday 2.3 baltimoresun.com 2.4 b3 Contributors 4 Facilities 5 Controversies 6 In popular culture 7 News partnership 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] The Sun was founded on May 17, 1837, by printer/publisher Arunah Shepherdson Abell (1806–1888) and two associates, William M. Swain (1809–1868) and Azariah H. Simmons, recently from Philadelphia, where they had started and published the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Public Ledger. Abell was born in Rhode Island, where he began journalism with the Providence Patriot
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Wilson Elkins
Wilson Homer "Bull" Elkins (July 9, 1908 – March 17, 1994)[1] was an American educator and university administrator. Career[edit] Elkins served as the president of the University of Maryland
Maryland
from 1954 to 1970, and then was president of the 5 campus University of Maryland System from 1970-1978. Elkins received an A.B. and an M.A. from the University of Texas in 1933, where he was also a star college football quarterback. He was a Rhodes Scholar
Rhodes Scholar
at Oxford University, where he completed a Ph.D.
Ph.D.
Elkins served as the president of San Angelo Junior College from 1938 to 1948. He left San Angelo to become president of Texas Western College in El Paso
El Paso
until beginning his tenure at the University of Maryland
Maryland
in 1954. At the University of Maryland, Elkins emphasized rigorous academic standards
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Governor Of Maryland
The Governor of Maryland
Maryland
heads the executive branch of the government of the State of Maryland, and is the commander-in-chief of the state's National Guard units. The Governor is the highest-ranking official in the state and has a broad range of appointive powers in both the State and local governments, as specified by the Maryland
Maryland
Constitution (1867, and revisions/amendments)
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Theodore McKeldin
Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin (November 20, 1900 – August 10, 1974) was an American politician. He was a member of the United States Republican Party, served as Mayor of Baltimore
Mayor of Baltimore
twice from 1943-47 and 1963-67, and was the 53rd Governor of Maryland
Governor of Maryland
in the United States from 1951 to 1959.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Political career 3 Personal 4 Dedications 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] McKeldin was born in Baltimore
Baltimore
to the family of a stonecutter turned policeman. He had 10 other siblings. He attended Baltimore
Baltimore
City College at night while working as a bank clerk during the day. He graduated from the University of Maryland Law School in 1925
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James A. Finnegan
James Aloysius Finnegan[3] (December 20, 1906 – March 26, 1958) was a Democratic politician from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
in 1931, and then served the United States Air Force
United States Air Force
as Lieutenant Colonel in the Troop Carrier Command in the United States, England, and France from 1942–46. Finnegan served in succession as Secretary of the Delaware River Navigation Commission under Governor George Earle, administrative assistant to Senator Francis Myers, administrative assistant to former Congressman Mike Bradley, and chair of the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
County Democratic Executive Committee. A member of Philadelphia
Philadelphia
City Council, he was elected its president in 1951, serving until January 1955. Finnegan became Secretary of the Commonwealth under Governor George Leader in 1955
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Oregon
Oregon
Oregon
(/ˈɔːrɪɡən/ ( listen)[7]) is a state in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region on the West Coast of the United States. The Columbia River
Columbia River
delineates much of Oregon's northern boundary along Washington state, while the Snake River
Snake River
delineates much of its eastern boundary along Idaho. The parallel 42° north delineates the southern boundary with California
California
and Nevada. Oregon
Oregon
is one of only three states of the contiguous United States
United States
to have a coastline on the Pacific Ocean. Oregon
Oregon
was inhabited by many indigenous tribes before Western traders, explorers, and settlers arrived
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Campaign Manager
A campaign manager or campaign director is a paid or volunteer individual whose role is to coordinate a political campaign's operations such as fundraising, advertising, polling, getting out the vote (with direct contact to the public), and other activities supporting the effort, directly. Apart from the candidate, they are often a campaign's most visible leader. However, modern campaign managers, particularly at the presidential level, are mostly concerned with executing strategy, not setting it. The senior strategists are typically outside political consultants, primarily pollsters and media consultants. Particularly for large, well-funded campaigns, campaign managers often manage a huge number of staffers and volunteers in a variety of departments, while also coordinating closely with the candidate and outside consultants. In the US, increasingly, campaign management has been a speciality occupation
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Vice President Of The United States
The Vice President of the United States
United States
(informally referred to as VPOTUS, or Veep) is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States
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