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United States Naval Academy
The United States Naval Academy
United States Naval Academy
(also known as USNA, Annapolis, or simply Navy) is a four-year coeducational federal service academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Established on 10 October 1845, under Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft, it is the second oldest of the United States' five service academies, and educates officers for commissioning primarily into the United States Navy
United States Navy
and United States Marine Corps. The 338-acre (137 ha) campus is located on the former grounds of Fort Severn
Fort Severn
at the confluence of the Severn River and Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
in Anne Arundel County, 33 miles (53 km) east of Washington, D.C. and 26 miles (42 km) southeast of Baltimore. The entire campus (known to insiders as "the Yard") is a National Historic Landmark and home to many historic sites, buildings, and monuments
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Medal Of Honor
The Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
is the United States
United States
of America's highest and most prestigious personal military decoration that may be awarded to recognize U.S. military service members who distinguished themselves by acts of valor.[5] The medal is normally awarded by the President of the United States
United States
in the name of the U.S. Congress. Because the medal is presented "in the name of Congress", it is often referred to informally as the "Congressional Medal of Honor". However, the official name of the current award is "Medal of Honor", as it began with the U.S. Army's version.[1][6] Within United States
United States
Code the medal is referred to as the "Medal of Honor",[7] and less frequently as "Congressional Medal of Honor".[8] U.S
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Coeducational
Mixed-sex education, also known as mixed-gender education, co-education or coeducation (abbreviated to co-ed or coed), is a system of education where males and females are educated together. Whereas single-sex education was more common up to the 19th century, mixed-sex education has since become standard in many cultures, particularly in Western countries. Single-sex education, however, remains prevalent in many Muslim
Muslim
countries. The relative merits of both systems have been the subject of debate. The world's oldest co-educational day and boarding school is Dollar Academy, a junior and senior school for males and females from ages 5 to 18 in Scotland, United Kingdom. From its opening in 1818 the school admitted both boys and girls of the parish of Dollar and the surrounding area. The school continues in existence to the present day with around 1,250 pupils.[1] The first co-educational college to be founded was Oberlin Collegiate Institute in Oberlin, Ohio
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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National Historic Landmark
A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
(NHL) is a building, district, object, site, or structure that is officially recognized by the United States government for its outstanding historical significance. Of over 90,000 places listed on the country's National Register of Historic Places, only some 2,500 are recognized as National Historic Landmarks. A National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
District may include contributing properties that are buildings, structures, sites or objects, and it may include non-contributing properties
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Eastern Intercollegiate Gymnastics League
The Eastern Intercollegiate Gymnastics
Gymnastics
League (EIGL) is an NCAA Division I college athletic conference which sponsors men’s gymnastics
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Chesapeake Bay
The Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
(/ˈtʃɛsəpiːk/ CHESS-ə-peek) is an estuary in District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and the U.S. states of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia, lying inland from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and surrounded to the west by the North American mainland and to the east by the Delmarva Peninsula.[2] With its northern portion in Maryland
Maryland
and the southern part in Virginia, the Chesapeake Bay
Chesapeake Bay
is a very important feature for the ecology and economy of those two states, as well as others
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Baltimore
Baltimore
Baltimore
(/ˈbɔːltɪmɔːr/, locally [ˈbɔɫmɔɻ]) is the largest city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Maryland, and the 30th-most populous city in the United States. Baltimore
Baltimore
was established by the Constitution of Maryland[9] and is an independent city that is not part of any county. With a population of 611,648 in 2017, Baltimore
Baltimore
is the largest independent city in the United States
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Severud Associates
Severud is a multinational structural engineering consulting firm headquartered in New York City, with additional offices in London
London
and Paris. The firm has worked on over 12,000 projects around the world.[1][2] History[edit] Severud was founded in the year 1928 by Fred Severud, a Norwegian born, American structural engineer and member of the National Academy of Engineering. Originally the firm was called Severud-Elstad-Krueger Associates, then renamed Severud-Perrone-Sturm-Bandel, and finally shortened to Severud Associates.[3][4] The company has designed numerous notable structures in their early history. These include Place Ville Marie
Place Ville Marie
(1962), Arecibo Observatory (1963),the St. Louis Gateway Arch
Gateway Arch
(1965), Madison Square Garden (1968), IDS Center
IDS Center
(1973), and AXA Center
AXA Center
(1985)
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Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Ensign (rank)
Ensign
Ensign
(/ˈɛnsən/, Late Middle English, from Old French
Old French
enseigne (12c.) "mark, symbol, signal; flag, standard, pennant", from Latin insignia (plural)) is a junior rank of a commissioned officer in the armed forces of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. As the junior officer in an infantry regiment was traditionally the carrier of the ensign flag, the rank acquired the name
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Second Lieutenant
Second lieutenant (called lieutenant in some countries) is a junior commissioned officer military rank in many armed forces, comparable to NATO OF-1b rank.Contents1 Australia 2 Canada 3 France 4 Greece 5 Indonesia 6 Israel 7 New Zealand 8 Norway 9 Pakistan 10 United Kingdom & other Commonwealth countries 11 United States 12 Insignia 13 See also 14 ReferencesAustralia[edit] The rank of second lieutenant existed in the military forces of the Australian colonies and Australian Army
Australian Army
until 1986. In the colonial forces, which closely followed the practices of the British military, the rank of second lieutenant began to replace ranks such as Ensign and Cornet from 1871. New appointments to the rank of second lieutenant ceased in the Regular Army in 1986.[1] Immediately prior to this change, the rank had been effectively reserved for new graduates from the Officer Cadet School, Portsea which closed in 1985
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Dean (education)
In academic administrations such as colleges or universities, a dean is the person with significant authority over a specific academic unit, or over a specific area of concern, or both. Deans are occasionally found in middle schools and high schools as well. The term comes from the Latin
Latin
decanus, "a leader of ten," taken from the medieval monasteries (particularly those following the Cluniac Reforms) which were often extremely large, with hundreds of monks (the size of a small college campus)
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