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United States Department Of The Interior
The United States Department of the Interior
United States Department of the Interior
(DOI) is the United States federal executive department of the U.S. government responsible for the management and conservation of most federal lands and natural resources, and the administration of programs relating to Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, territorial affairs, and insular areas of the United States. About 75% of federal public land is managed by the department, with most of the remainder managed by the United States Department of Agriculture's United States Forest Service.[3] The Department is administered by the United States Secretary of the Interior, who is a member of the Cabinet of the President. The current Secretary is Ryan Zinke
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Wildlife Refuge
A wildlife sanctuary, is a naturally occurring sanctuary, such as an island, that provides protection for species from hunting, predation, competition or poaching; it is a protected area, a geographic territory within which wildlife is protected. Refuges can preserve animals that are endangered. Such wildlife refuges are generally officially designated territories. They are created by government legislation, publicly or privately owned (The area near the Chernobyl nuclear accident site accidentally became a wildlife refuge when it became uninhabitable to humans). In the United States, the U.S
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United States Senate
Majority (50)     Republican (50)Minority (49)     Democratic (47)      Independents (2) caucusing with the DemocratsVacant (1)     Vacant (1)Length of term6 yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 states.Last electionNovember 8, 2016 (34 seats)Next electionNovember 6, 2018 (33 seats)Meeting placeSenate chamber United States
Unite

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United States Declaration Of Independence
The United States
United States
Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress
Second Continental Congress
meeting at the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. The Declaration announced that the thirteen American colonies then at war with the Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
would regard themselves as thirteen independent sovereign states no longer under British rule. With the Declaration, these new states took a collective first step toward forming the United States
United States
of America
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James Madison
James Madison
James Madison
Jr. (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836)[2] was an American statesman and Founding Father who served as the fourth President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1809 to 1817. He is hailed as the "Father of the Constitution" for his pivotal role in drafting and promoting the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
and the Bill of Rights. Born into a prominent Virginia
Virginia
planting family, Madison served as a member of the Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates and the Continental Congress during and after the American Revolutionary War
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Mexican–American War
American victoryTreaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo Mexican recognition of U.S. sovereignty over Texas
Texas
(among other territories) End of the conflict between Mexico
Mexico
and Republic of TexasTerritorialchanges Mexican CessionBelligerents   United States
United States
California
California
Republic[1] MexicoCommanders and leaders James K. Polk
James K. Polk
Winfield Scott
Winfield Scott
Zachary Taylor
Zachary Taylor
Stephen W. Kearny
Stephen W. Kearny
John Drake Sloat William Jenkins Worth Robert Field Stockton Joseph Lane Franklin Pierce
Franklin Pierce
David Conner Matthew C. Perry
Matthew C. Perry
John C
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United States Secretary Of The Treasury
A secretary or personal assistant is a person whose work consists of supporting management, including executives, using a variety of project management, communication, or organizational skills. These functions may be entirely carried out to assist one other employee or may be for the benefit of more than one. In other situations a secretary is an officer of a society or organization who deals with correspondence, admits new members, and organizes official meetings and events.[1][2][3]Contents1 Duties and functions 2 Etymology 3 Origin 4 Modern developments 5 Contemporary employment 6 Training by country6.1 Belgium 6.2 United States7 Executive assistant7.1 Civilian 7.2 Military8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksDuties and functions[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
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United States Patent And Trademark Office
The United States
United States
Patent
Patent
and Trademark
Trademark
Office (USPTO) is an agency in the U.S. Department of Commerce that issues patents to inventors and businesses for their inventions, and trademark registration for product and intellectual property identification. The USPTO
USPTO
is "unique among federal agencies because it operates solely on fees collected by its users, and not on taxpayer dollars".[2] Its "operating structure is like a business in that it receives requests for services—applications for patents and trademark registrations—and charges fees projected to cover the cost of performing the services [it] provide[s]".[2][3] The USPTO
USPTO
is based in Alexandria, Virginia, after a 2005 move from the Crystal City area of neighboring Arlington, Virginia
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United States House Of Representatives
Majority (238)     Republican (238)Minority (193)     Democratic (193)Vacant (4)     Vacant (4)Length of termTwo yearsElectionsVoting systemFirst-past-the-post in most states; nonpartisan blanket primary with a majoritarian second round in 3 statesLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting State legislatures or redistricting commissions, varies by stateMeeting placeHouse of Representatives chamber United States
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United States Statutes At Large
The United States Statutes at Large, commonly referred to as the Statutes at Large and abbreviated Stat., are an official record of Acts of Congress and concurrent resolutions passed by the United States Congress. Each act and resolution of Congress is originally published as a slip law, which is classified as either public law (abbreviated Pub.L.) or private law (Pvt.L.), and designated and numbered accordingly. At the end of a Congressional session, the statutes enacted during that session are compiled into bound books, known as "session law" publications. The session law publication for U.S. Federal statutes is called the United States Statutes at Large. In that publication, the public laws and private laws are numbered and organised in chronological order.[1] U.S
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President Of The United States
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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United States Congress
House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D) Majority Leader Steny Hoyer
Steny Hoyer
(D) Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R) Congressional districtsSenate
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Patronage
Patronage is the support, encouragement, privilege, or financial aid that an organization or individual bestows to another. In the history of art, arts patronage refers to the support that kings, popes, and the wealthy have provided to artists such as musicians, painters, and sculptors. It can also refer to the right of bestowing offices or church benefices, the business given to a store by a regular customer, and the guardianship of saints. The word "patron" derives from the Latin: patronus ("patron"), one who gives benefits to his clients (see Patronage in ancient Rome). In some countries the term is used to describe political patronage, which is the use of state resources to reward individuals for their electoral support
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Whig Party (United States)
The Whig Party was a political party active in the middle of the 19th century in the United States. Four United States
United States
Presidents belonged to the party while in office.[5] It emerged in the 1830s as the leading opponent of Jacksonians, pulling together former members of the National Republican (one of the successors of the Democratic-Republican Party) and the Anti-Masonic Party. It had links to the upscale traditions of the Federalist Party. Along with the rival Democratic Party, it was central to the Second Party System
Second Party System
from the early 1840s to the mid-1860s.[6] It originally formed in opposition to the policies of President Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson
(in office 1829–1837) and his Democratic Party
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Reservoir (water)
A reservoir (from French réservoir – a "tank") is a storage space for fluids. These fluids may be water, hydrocarbons or gas. A reservoir usually means an enlarged natural or artificial lake, storage pond or impoundment created using a dam or lock to store water. Reservoirs can be created by controlling a stream that drains an existing body of water. They can also be constructed in river valleys using a dam. Alternately, a reservoir can be built by excavating flat ground or constructing retaining walls and levees. Tank reservoirs store liquids or gases in storage tanks that may be elevated, at grade level, or buried
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