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United States Bureau Of Reclamation
The United States
United States
Bureau of Reclamation (USBR), and formerly the United States
United States
Reclamation Service (not to be confused with the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement), is a federal agency under the U.S. Department of the Interior, which oversees water resource management, specifically as it applies to the oversight and operation of the diversion, delivery, and storage projects that it has built throughout the western United States
United States
for irrigation, water supply, and attendant hydroelectric power generation. Currently the USBR is the largest wholesaler of water in the country, bringing water to more than 31 million people, and providing one in five Western farmers with irrigation water for 10 million acres of farmland, which produce 60% of the nation's vegetables and 25% of its fruits and nuts
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United States Bicycle Route System
The United States
United States
Bicycle Route System (abbreviated USBRS) is the national cycling route network of the United States. It consists of interstate long-distance cycling routes that use multiple types of bicycling infrastructure, including off-road paths, bicycle lanes, and low-traffic roads. As with the complementary United States
United States
Numbered Highways system for motorists, each U.S. Bicycle Route is maintained by state and local governments. The USBRS is intended to eventually traverse the entire country, like the Dutch National Cycle Routes and the United Kingdom's National Cycle Network, yet at a scale similar to the EuroVelo
EuroVelo
network that spans Europe. The USBRS was established in 1978 by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the same body that coordinates the numbering of Interstate highways and U.S. Routes. The first two U.S
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Acre
The acre is a unit of land area used in the imperial and US customary systems. It is defined as the area of 1 chain by 1 furlong (66 by 660 feet), which is exactly equal to ​1⁄640 of a square mile, 43,560 square feet, approximately 4,047 m2, or about 40% of a hectare. The acre is commonly used in many countries, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, India, Ghana, and others. The international symbol of the acre is ac. The most commonly used acre today is the international acre. In the United States both the international acre and the US survey acre are in use, but differ by only two parts per million; see below. The most common use of the acre is to measure tracts of land
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Utah
Utah
Utah
(/ˈjuːtɑː/ YOO-tah, /ˈjuːtɔː/ (listen) YOO-taw) is a state in the western United States. It became the 45th state admitted to the U.S. on January 4, 1896. Utah
Utah
is the 13th-largest by area, 30th-most-populous, and 11th-least-densely populated of the 50 United States. Utah
Utah
has a population of more than 3 million according to the Census estimate for July 1, 2016
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Electricity
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Jimmy Carter
Governor of Georgia1970 Georgia gubernatorial campaign1972 presidential campaignConvention1976 Presidential Race1976 presidential campaignElectionPresident of the United StatesPresidencyTimelineInaugurationCamp David AccordsEgypt- Israel
Israel
Peace TreatyTorrijos-Carter Treaties Iran
Iran
Hostage CrisisOperation Eagle ClawMoral Equivalent of War speech 1979 Energy Crisis Carter Doctrine Diplomatic Relations with ChinaAppointmentsCabinet JudiciaryPost-PresidencyPresidential Library Activities Carter Center One America Appealv t eJames Earl Carter Jr. (born October 1, 1924) is an American politician who served as the 39th President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1977 to 1981
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Civilian Public Service
The Civilian Public Service
Civilian Public Service
(CPS) was a program of the United States government that provided conscientious objectors with an alternative to military service during World War II. From 1941 to 1947, nearly 12,000 draftees, willing to serve their country in some capacity but unwilling to perform any type of military service, accepted assignments in work of national importance in 152 CPS camps throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Draftees from the historic peace churches and other faiths worked in areas such as soil conservation, forestry, fire fighting, agriculture, under the supervision of such agencies as the U.S. Forest Service, the Soil Conservation Service, and the National Park Service. Others helped provide social services and mental health services. The CPS men served without wages and minimal support from the federal government
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., (/ˈwɑːʃɪŋtən ˌdiːˈsiː/) formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington; D.C.; or the district, is the capital of the United States.[6] Founded after the American Revolution
American Revolution
as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first president of the
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries, it started in 1929 and lasted until the late 1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how intensely the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929, (known as Black Tuesday)
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Waterlogging (agriculture)
Waterlogging refers to the saturation of soil with water.[1] Soil
Soil
may be regarded as waterlogged when it is nearly saturated with water much of the time such that its air phase is restricted and anaerobic conditions prevail. In extreme cases of prolonged waterlogging, anaerobiosis occurs, the roots of mesophytes suffer, and the subsurface reducing atmosphere leads to such processes as denitrification, methanogenesis, and the reduction of iron and manganese oxides.[2] In agriculture, various crops need air (specifically, oxygen) to a greater or lesser depth in the soil. Waterlogging of the soil stops air getting in. How near the water table must be to the surface for the ground to be classed as waterlogged, varies with the purpose in view
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Texas
Texas
Texas
(/ˈtɛksəs/, locally /-sɪz/; Spanish: Texas
Texas
or Tejas [ˈtexas]) is the second largest state in the United States
United States
by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas
Texas
shares borders with the U.S
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Ethan A. Hitchcock (Interior)
Ethan Allen
Ethan Allen
Hitchcock (September 19, 1835 – April 9, 1909) served under Presidents William McKinley
William McKinley
and Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
as U.S. Secretary of the Interior.Contents1 Business career 2 Government career 3 References 4 External linksBusiness career[edit] Hitchcock was born on September 19, 1835, in Mobile, Alabama, the son of Henry Hitchcock
Henry Hitchcock
(1791 - 1839), a justice on the Alabama
Alabama
Supreme Court, and Anne Erwin Hitchcock
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Vegetable
In everyday usage, vegetables are certain parts of plants that are consumed by humans as food as part of a savory meal. Originally, the traditional term (still commonly used in biology) included the flowers, fruit, stems, leaves, roots, tubers, bark, seeds, and all other plant matter, although modern-day culinary usage of the term vegetable may exclude food derived from plants such as fruits, nuts, and cereal grains, but include seeds such as pulses; the term vegetable is somewhat arbitrary, and can be largely defined through culinary and cultural tradition. Originally, vegetables were collected from the wild by hunter-gatherers and entered cultivation in several parts of the world, probably during the period 10,000 BC to 7,000 BC, when a new agricultural way of life developed. At first, plants which grew locally would have been cultivated, but as time went on, trade brought exotic crops from elsewhere to add to domestic types
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World War II
Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria & Northern Korea Mediterranean and Middle EastNorth Africa East Africa Mediterranean Sea Adriatic Malta Yugoslavia Iraq Syria–Lebanon Iran Italy Dodecanese Southern France Other campaignsAtlantic Arctic Strategic bombing Americas French West Africa Indian Ocean Madagascar Contemporaneous warsSoviet–Japanese border conflicts Franco-Thai War Ecuadorian–Peruvian War Ili Rebellion Afghan tribal revolts World War II Alphabetical indices A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 0–9Navigation CampaignsCountriesEquipment TimelineOutlineLists PortalCategoryBibliography vte World War II (often abbreviated to WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis
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Wholesale
Wholesaling, jobbing, or distributing is the sale of goods or merchandise to retailers; to industrial, commercial, institutional, or other professional business users; or to other wholesalers and related subordinated services.[1] In general, it is the sale of goods to anyone other than a standard consumer. According to the United Nations Statistics Division, "wholesale" is the resale (sale without transformation) of new and used goods to retailers, to industrial, commercial, institutional or professional users, or to other wholesalers, or involves acting as an agent or broker in buying merchandise for, or selling merchandise to, such persons or companies
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Water Supply
Water
Water
supply is the provision of water by public utilities commercial organisations, community endeavors or by individuals, usually via a system of pumps and pipes
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