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United States Attorney General
The United States Attorney
United States Attorney
General (A.G.) is the head of the United States Department of Justice per 28 U.S.C. § 503, concerned with all legal affairs, and is the chief lawyer of the United States government. In cases of the federal death penalty, the power to seek the death penalty rests with the Attorney General. Under Article II Sec. 2 of the Constitution the Attorney General is nominated by the President and appointed with the advice and consent of Congress. The Constitution is clear that the Attorney General may be impeached by Congress. As to whether the Attorney General may be summarily removed by the President, no provision of the Constitution grants this power. The decisional law suggests that the President has the power to remove an official engaged in purely executive functions or an official whose duties immediately affect the President's ability to fulfill his constitutional responsibilities, Bowsher v
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Inauguration Day
The inauguration of the President of the United States
President of the United States
is a ceremony to mark the commencement of a new four-year term of the President of the United States. This ceremony takes place for each new presidential term, even if the president is continuing in office for a second term. Since 1937, it has taken place on January 20, which is 72 to 78 days after the November presidential election (on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November). The term of a president commences at noon ("EST" – Eastern Standard Time) on that day, when the Chief Justice of the United States administers the oath of office to the president. However, when January 20 falls on a Sunday, the chief justice administers the oath to the president on that day privately and then again in a public ceremony the next day, on Monday, January 21
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President-elect Of The United States
The President -elect of the United States is the person who has won the quadrennial United States presidential election, but who has not yet been inaugurated into office. President -elect is also the honorific title accorded this individual. The only constitutional provisions pertaining directly to the president-elect, address matters related to the election winner's availability to take the oath of office
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Political Appointments In The United States
According to the United States Office of Government Ethics, a political appointee is "any employee who is appointed by the President, the Vice President, or agency head". As of 2016, an incoming administration needs to appoint around 4,000 new employees, of which about 1,200 require Senate approval.[1][2]Contents1 Types 2 Ethics restrictions 3 History 4 Issues 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTypes[edit] There are four basic types of political appointments:Presidential Appointments with Senate Confirmation (PAS): These positions require a congressional hearing and a confirmation vote of the full Senate under the Appointments Clause
Appointments Clause
of the United States Constitution
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United States Senate Committee On The Judiciary
The United States Senate
United States Senate
Committee on the Judiciary, informally the Senate Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of 21 U.S. Senators whose role is to oversee of the Department of Justice (DOJ), consider executive nominations, and review pending legislation.[1][2] The Judiciary Committee's oversight of the DOJ includes all of the agencies under the DOJ's jurisdiction, such as the FBI
FBI
and the Department of Homeland Security
Department of Homeland Security
(DHS). The Committee considers presidential nominations for positions in the DOJ, the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Justice Institute, and certain positions in the Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and DHS. It is also in charge of holding hearings and investigating judicial nominations to the Supreme Court, the U.S. court of appeals, the U.S
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Independent (politician)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Federalist Party
The Federalist Party, referred to as the Pro-Administration Party until the 3rd United States Congress, was the first American political party. It existed from the early 1790s to 1816, though its remnants lasted into the 1820s. The Federalists called for a strong national government that promoted economic growth and fostered friendly relationships with Great Britain as well as opposition to revolutionary France. The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican
Democratic-Republican
opposition led by Thomas Jefferson. The Federalist Party
Federalist Party
came into being between 1792 and 1794 as a national coalition of bankers and businessmen in support of Alexander Hamilton's fiscal policies. These supporters developed into the organized Federalist Party, which was committed to a fiscally sound and nationalistic government
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United States Secretary Of The Treasury
A secretary or personal assistant is a person whose work consists of supporting management, including executives, using a variety of project management, communication, or organizational skills. These functions may be entirely carried out to assist one other employee or may be for the benefit of more than one. In other situations a secretary is an officer of a society or organization who deals with correspondence, admits new members, and organizes official meetings and events.[1][2][3]Contents1 Duties and functions 2 Etymology 3 Origin 4 Modern developments 5 Contemporary employment 6 Training by country6.1 Belgium 6.2 United States7 Executive assistant7.1 Civilian 7.2 Military8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksDuties and functions[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
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Democratic-Republican Party
The Democratic-Republican Party
Democratic-Republican Party
was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison
James Madison
between 1791 and 1793 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party
Federalist Party
run by Alexander Hamilton, who was secretary of the treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.[5] From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves "Republicans" after their ideology, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist commitment to republicanism
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Questions Of Law
In law, a question of law, also known as a point of law, is a question that must be answered by applying relevant legal principles to interpretation of the law.[1] Such a question is distinct from a question of fact, which must be answered by reference to facts and evidence as well inferences arising from those facts. Answers to questions of law are generally expressed in terms of broad legal principles and can be applied to many situations rather than be dependent on particular circumstances or factual situations. An answer to a question of law as applied to the particular facts of a case is often referred to as a "conclusion of law." In several civil law jurisdictions, the highest courts consider questions of fact settled by the lower court and will only consider questions of law. They thus may refer a case back to a lower court to re-apply the law and answer any fact-based evaluations based on their answer on the application of the law
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Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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United States Congress
House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D) Majority Leader Steny Hoyer
Steny Hoyer
(D) Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R) Congressional districtsSenate
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Bowsher V. Synar
Bowsher v. Synar, 478 U.S. 714 (1986), was a United States Supreme Court case that struck down the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act
Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act
as an unconstitutional usurpation of executive power by Congress because the law empowered Congress to terminate the United States Comptroller General for certain specified reasons, including "inefficiency, 'neglect of duty,' or 'malfeasance.'" The named defendant in the original case was Comptroller General Charles Arthur Bowsher and the constitutional challenge was brought forth by Oklahoma Congressman Mike Synar.Contents1 Facts 2 Holding 3 Reasoning 4 Dissent 5 See also 6 External linksFacts[edit] Under the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act, allowable deficit levels were calculated in considerarion of the eventual elimination of the federal deficit. If the budget exceeded the allowable deficit, across-the-board cuts were required
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Impeachment In The United States
Impeachment
Impeachment
in the United States is an enumerated power of the legislature that allows formal charges to be brought against a civil officer of government for crimes alleged to have been committed. Most impeachments have concerned alleged crimes committed while in office, though there have been a few cases in which Congress has impeached and convicted officials partly for prior crimes.[1] The actual trial on such charges, and subsequent removal of an official upon conviction, is separate from the act of impeachment itself. Impeachment proceedings have been initiated against several presidents of the United States
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Democratic Party (United States)
The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party (GOP). Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest political party.[16] The Democrats' dominant worldview was once social conservatism and economic liberalism while populism was its leading characteristic in the rural South. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
ran as a third-party candidate in the Progressive ("Bull Moose") Party, leading to a switch of political platforms between the Democratic and Republican Party and Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
being elected as the first fiscally progressive Democrat. Since Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Government Of The United States
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government
Government
is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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