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Union Between Sweden And Norway
b. ^ The written Norwegian language
Norwegian language
ceased to exist in the first half of the 16th century and was replaced by Danish. Written Danish was still used during the union with Sweden, but was slightly norwegianized in the latter half of the 19th century. In 1885, the Storting
Storting
accepted Landsmål
Landsmål
as an official written language at par with Danish. c. ^ 1820: 2,585,000 in Sweden, and 970,000 in Norway.[1] 1905: 5,260,000 in Sweden, and 2,300,000 in Norway.[2] d. ^ The Swedish Riksdag
Riksdag
was a diet composed of four estates until 1866, when it was transformed into a bicameral legislature
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North Germanic Languages
Insular Scandinavian languages:   Faroese   Icelandic   Norn (†)    Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
(†)Extinct Norn was spoken in Orkney, Shetland
Shetland
and Caithness
Caithness
in what is now Scotland
Scotland
until the 19th century. Extinct Greenlandic Norse
Greenlandic Norse
was spoken in the Norse settlements of Greenland
Greenland
until their demise in the late 15th century.The North Germanic languages
Germanic languages
make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
and the extinct East Germanic languages
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Riksdag Of The Estates
Riksdag
Riksdag
of the Estates (formally Swedish: Riksens ständer; informally Swedish: Ståndsriksdagen) was the name used for the Estates of Sweden when they were assembled. Until its dissolution in 1866, the institution was the highest authority in Sweden
Sweden
next to the King
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History Of Denmark
The history of Denmark
Denmark
as a unified kingdom began in the 8th century, but historic documents describe the geographic area and the people living there—the Danes—as early as 500 AD. These early documents include the writings of Jordanes
Jordanes
and Procopius. With the Christianization
Christianization
of the Danes
Danes
c. 960 AD, it is clear that there existed a kingship speaking
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Denmark
Denmark
Denmark
(/ˈdɛnmɑːrk/ ( listen); Danish: Danmark, pronounced [ˈdanmɑɡ] ( listen)), officially the Kingdom of Denmark,[N 9] is a Nordic country and a sovereign state. The southernmost of the Scandinavian nations, it is south-west of Sweden
Sweden
and south of Norway,[N 10] and bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark
Denmark
also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark
Denmark
proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands,[N 2][10] with the largest being Zealand, Funen
Funen
and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate
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Norse Mythology
Norse mythology
Norse mythology
is the body of myths of the North Germanic peoples, stemming from Norse paganism
Norse paganism
and continuing after the Christianization of Scandinavia, and into the Scandinavian folklore
Scandinavian folklore
of the modern period
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Old Norse
Old Norse
Old Norse
was a North Germanic language that was spoken by inhabitants of Scandinavia
Scandinavia
and their overseas settlements from about the 9th to the 13th centuries. The Proto-Norse language
Proto-Norse language
developed into Old Norse
Old Norse
by the 8th century, and Old Norse
Old Norse
began to develop into the modern North Germanic languages in the mid- to late 14th century, ending the language phase known as Old Norse. These dates, however, are not absolute, since written Old Norse
Old Norse
is found well into the 15th century.[2] Old Norse
Old Norse
was divided into three dialects: Old West Norse, Old East Norse, and Old Gutnish. Old West and East Norse formed a dialect continuum, with no clear geographical boundary between them
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History Of The Riksdag
The Riksdag
Riksdag
is the national legislature of Sweden. However, when it was founded in 1866 Sweden
Sweden
did not have a parliamentary system of government. The national legislatures of Estonia and Finland are also called Riksdag
Riksdag
in Swedish.Contents1 The Old Riksdag 2 The New Riksdag 3 Democracy emerges 4 Constitutional reform 5 Present 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksThe Old Riksdag[edit] Main article: Riksdag
Riksdag
of the Estates The precursor to the modern Riksdag
Riksdag
was the Riksdag
Riksdag
of the Estates (Swedish: Ståndsriksdagen). Of ancient origin in the Viking Things, the meeting of the Swedish nobility
Swedish nobility
at Arboga, in 1435 is considered as the first Riksdag
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List Of Countries By Population
This is a list of countries and dependent territories by population. It includes sovereign states, inhabited dependent territories and, in some cases, constituent countries of sovereign states, with inclusion within the list being primarily based on the ISO standard ISO 3166-1. For instance, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is considered as a single entity while the constituent countries of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Kingdom of the Netherlands
are considered separately. In addition, this list includes certain states with limited recognition not found in ISO 3166-1. The population figures do not reflect the practice of countries that report significantly different populations of citizens domestically and overall
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List Of Countries And Dependencies By Area
This is a list of the world's countries and their dependent territories by area, ranked by total area. Entries in this list include, but are not limited to, those in the ISO 3166-1 standard, which includes sovereign states and dependent territories
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19th Century
The 1 9th century
9th century
was a century that began on January 1, 1801
1801
and ended on December 31, 1900. The 1 9th century
9th century
was a period of social change. Slavery
Slavery
was largely abolished, and the Second Industrial Revolution
Second Industrial Revolution
led to massive urbanization. It was marked by the collapse of the Spanish, Napoleonic, Holy Roman and Mughal empires. This paved the way for the growing influence of the British Empire, the Russian Empire, the United States, the German Empire, the French colonial empire and Meiji Japan, with the British boasting unchallenged dominance after 1815. After the defeat of the French Empire and its allies in the Napoleonic Wars, the British and Russian empires expanded greatly, becoming the world's leading powers. The Russian Empire
Russian Empire
expanded in central and far eastern Asia
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Swedish Riksdaler
The riksdaler was the name of a Swedish coin first minted in 1604. Between 1777 and 1873, it was the currency of Sweden. The daler, like the dollar,[1] was named after the German Thaler. The similarly named Reichsthaler, rijksdaalder, and rigsdaler were used in Germany
Germany
and Austria-Hungary, the Netherlands, and Denmark-Norway, respectively. Riksdaler is still used as a colloquial term for Sweden's modern-day currency.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Penning accounting system 1.2 Riksdaler accounting system 1.3 Decimal system2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Penning accounting system[edit] The daler was introduced in 1534. It was initially intended for international use and was divided into 4 marks and then a mark is further subdivided into 8 öres and then a öre is further subdivided into 24 pennings. In 1604, the name was changed to riksdaler ("daler of the realm", c.f. Reichsthaler)
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Swedish Language
Swedish ( svenska (help·info) [²svɛnːska]) is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 9.6 million people, predominantly in Sweden
Sweden
(as the sole official language), and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish. It is largely mutually intelligible with Norwegian and to some extent with Danish, although the degree of mutual intelligibility is largely dependent on the dialect and accent of the speaker. Both Norwegian and Danish are generally easier to read than to listen to because of difference in accent and tone when speaking. Swedish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era
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Sami Languages
Sami languages
Sami languages
(/ˈsɑːmi/[5]) is a group of Uralic languages
Uralic languages
spoken by the Sami people
Sami people
in Northern Europe
Northern Europe
(in parts of northern Finland, Norway, Sweden
Sweden
and extreme northwestern Russia). There are, depending on the nature and terms of division, ten or more Sami languages. Several names are used for the Sami languages: Saami, Sámi, Saame, Samic, Saamic, as well as the exonyms Lappish and Lappic
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Danish Language
Danish /ˈdeɪnɪʃ/ ( listen) (dansk pronounced [ˈdanˀsɡ] ( listen); dansk sprog, [ˈdanˀsɡ ˈsbʁɔwˀ]) is a North Germanic language spoken by around six million people, principally in Denmark
Denmark
and in the region of Southern Schleswig
Southern Schleswig
in northern Germany, where it has minority language status.[3] Also, minor Danish-speaking communities are found in Norway, Sweden, Spain, the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Argentina. Due to immigration and language shift in urban areas, around 15–20% of the population of Greenland
Greenland
speak Danish as their home language. Along with the other North Germanic languages, Danish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
who lived in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
during the Viking Era
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King
King is the title given to a male monarch in a variety of contexts. The female equivalent is queen regnant,[1] while the title of queen on its own usually refers to the consort of a king.In the context of prehistory, antiquity and contemporary indigenous peoples, the title may refer to tribal kingship. Germanic kingship is cognate with Indo-European traditions of tribal rulership (c.f. Indic rājan, Gothic reiks, and Old Irish rí, etc.). In the context of classical antiquity, king may translate in Latin as rex and in Greek as archon or basileus. In classical European feudalism, the title of king as the ruler of a kingdom is understood to be the highest rank in the feudal order, potentially subject, at least nominally, only to an emperor (harking back to the client kings of the Roman Empire).[2] In a modern context, the title may refer to the ruler of one of a number of modern monarchies (either absolute or constitutional)
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