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Uijeongbu
Coordinates : 37°44′35″N 127°02′04″E / 37.743164°N 127.03448°E / 37.743164; 127.03448 UIJEONGBU (Korean pronunciation: ) is a city in Gyeonggi Province , South Korea
South Korea
. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 Transport * 3 Education * 4 Land usage * 5 Sister cities * 6 In popular culture * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links OVERVIEW Uijeongbu
Uijeongbu
is located north of the Korean capital Seoul
Seoul
; it lies inside a defile , with mountains on two sides, and commands a natural choke point across the main traditional invasion route from the North into Seoul
Seoul
. As such it has a continued military significance and it contains U.S. and Korean military bases, positioned for the defense of the Korean capital. The U.S. Second Infantry Division has established a headquarters post in Uijeongbu, with the main troops being deployed from Dongducheon
Dongducheon
city. Despite being known for its military presence, the area has boomed into a satellite community of Seoul
Seoul
with shops, cinemas, restaurants and bars, PC bangs and DVD Bangs. In addition to U.S. personnel, it is popular with the English hagwon (a for-profit private institute, academy or cram school ). There are several mountains such as Mt. Dobong ( Dobongsan ), Mt. Surak and Mt. Soyo
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State Council Of Joseon
The STATE COUNCIL OF JOSEON or UIJEONGBU was the highest organ of government under the Joseon Dynasty of Korea. It was led by three officials known as the High State Councillors. The Councilors were entrusted to deliberate over key problems of state, advising the king, and conveying royal decisions to the Six Ministries . The Council was formed under the reign of Jeongjong , just before Taejong seized power in 1400. It replaced an earlier institution called the "Privy Council," which had been dominated by Jeong Dojeon and other key figures behind the dynasty's founding. The State Council gradually declined in importance over the 500 years of Joseon's rule and replaced by the cabinet in 1907. A plaque marking the former location of the State Council stands today near Gwanghwamun in central Seoul
Seoul
. The Chief State Councilor Yeonguijeong 영의정 was followed by the Left State Councilor Jwauijeong 좌의정 and the Right State Councilor Uuijeong 우의정. Today, there's a city which was named after this organ ( Uijeongbu ) in Gyeonggi-do . NOTES * ^ A B Lee (1984), p. 175. * ^ Lee (1984), p
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Cities Of South Korea
A CITY is a municipal administrative unit in South Korea
South Korea
. Cities are ranked on the same level as county and autonomous district . Like other contemporary administrative units, they are defined by the Local Autonomy Law. CONTENTS * 1 City status * 2 Classifications for large municipal cities * 2.1 Specific city * 2.2 Cities with more than 400,000 * 2.3 Administrative city * 3 See also * 4 References CITY STATUSUnder South Korean laws sets the following condition for a municipality to be designated as a city: population of a county must generally be 150,000 or greater or passage of a special legislative bill by the National Assembly such as Gyeryong . CLASSIFICATIONS FOR LARGE MUNICIPAL CITIESThe national government can designate cities of at least 500,000 inhabitants to have the status of special status city. These statuses expand the scope of administrative authority delegated from the provincial government to the city government. Also city with be reclassify as a Metropolitan city of at least 1,000,000 inhabitants, only Suwon
Suwon
and Changwon have met the requirements but have not yet been nominated
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South Korea
Coordinates : 36°N 128°E / 36°N 128°E / 36; 128 Republic
Republic
of Korea 대한민국 大韓民國 _DAEHAN MINGUK_ _ Flag Emblem MOTTO: "홍익인간 (弘益人間) " (Korean ) (de facto _) "Benefit broadly in the human world/Devotion to the Welfare of Humanity" ANTHEM: Aegukga "애국가 (愛國歌)" (Korean ) (_de facto _) "Patriotic Song" GOVERNMENT EMBLEM 대한민국정부 상징문양 (Korean) Government Emblem of South Korea
Korea
Area controlled by the Republic
Republic
of Korea
Korea
shown in dark green; claimed but uncontrolled regions shown in light green
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Regions Of Korea
Korea
Korea
has traditionally been divided into a number of unofficial REGIONS that reflect historical, geographical, and dialect boundaries within the peninsula . Many of the names in the list below overlap or are obsolete today, with Honam , Yeongdong , Yeongnam , and the modern term Sudogwon being the only ones in wide use. The names of Korea's traditional Eight Provinces are often also used as regional monikers. LIST OF REGIONS RR MC KOREAN HANJA DIVISIONS TODAY Haeseo Haesŏ 해서 海西 N. Hwanghae and S. Hwanghae North Korea
Korea
Gwanseo Kwansŏ 관서 關西 Pyongyang
Pyongyang
, Nampo
Nampo
, N. Pyongan , S. Pyongan and Chagang North Korea
Korea
Gwandong Kwandong 관동 關東 Gangwon / Kangwon Both Gwannam Kwannam 관남 關南 S. Hamgyong and southern part of Ryanggang ; Southern part of Gwanbuk North Korea
Korea
Gwanbuk Kwanbuk 관북 關北 Rason , N. Hamgyong , S
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Gyeonggi-do
GYEONGGI-DO ( Hangul : 경기도, Korean pronunciation: ) is the most populous province in South Korea
South Korea
. Its name, Gyeonggi means "the area surrounding capital". Thus Gyeonggi-do can be translated as "province surrounding Seoul". The provincial capital is Suwon
Suwon
. Seoul
Seoul
—South Korea's largest city and national capital—is in the heart of the province but has been separately administered as a provincial-level special city since 1946. Incheon
Incheon
—South Korea's third largest city—is on the coast of the province and has been similarly administered as a provincial-level metropolitan city since 1981. The three jurisdictions are collectively referred to as Sudogwon
Sudogwon
and cover 11,730 km2, with a combined population of 25.5 million—amounting to over half of the entire population of South Korea
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Administrative Divisions Of South Korea
South Korea
South Korea
is made up of 17 first-tier administrative divisions: 6 metropolitan cities (_gwangyeoksi_ 광역시/廣域市), 1 special city (_teukbyeolsi_ 특별시/特別市), 1 special self-governing city (_teukbyeol-jachisi_ 특별자치시/特別自治市), and 9 provinces (_do_ 도/道), including one special self-governing province (_teukbyeol jachido_ 특별자치도/特別自治道). These are further subdivided into a variety of smaller entities, including cities (_si_ 시/市), counties (_gun_ 군/郡), districts (_gu_ 구/區), towns (_eup_ 읍/邑), townships (_myeon_ 면/面), neighborhoods (_dong_ 동/洞) and villages (_ri_ 리/里)
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Seoul Dialect
The GYEONGGI DIALECT (경기 방언) or SEOUL DIALECT (서울 사투리/서울말) of the Korean language is the prestige dialect of the language and the basis of the standardized form used in both Korean nation states: South and North . It spoken throughout Korean Peninsula and in the Korean diaspora, but it is mainly concentrated in the Seoul National Capital Area , the most densely populated part of South Korea, which includes the cities of Seoul and Incheon , as well as the whole Gyeonggi Province . It is also spoken in the city of Kaesong and the counties of Kaepung and Changpung in North Korea. CONTENTS * 1 Pronunciation * 2 Variations in accent * 3 See also * 4 References PRONUNCIATIONThe vowels for _e_ and _ae_ are merged for young speakers and vowel length is not distinguished consistently, if at all. Among young speakers or in informal contexts, the postpositions _-do_ (-도, "also"), _-ro_ (-로, "to") and _-go_ (-고, "and then") and their derivatives tend to be pronounced with _-du_ (-두), _-ru_ (-루) and _-gu_ (-구). The sentence-final verb ending _-yo_ tends to be pronounced with a schwa , which is sometimes transcribed as _-yeo_ (-여) on the Internet in informal contexts. _Samchon_ (삼촌, "uncle") is usually pronounced as _samchun_ (삼춘). Young Seoul dialect speakers tend to end interrogative sentences (questions) with _-nya?_ (-냐?)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
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Gyeonggi Province
GYEONGGI-DO ( Hangul : 경기도, Korean pronunciation: ) is the most populous province in South Korea . Its name, _Gyeonggi_ means "the area surrounding capital". Thus _Gyeonggi-do_ can be translated as "province surrounding Seoul". The provincial capital is Suwon . Seoul —South Korea's largest city and national capital—is in the heart of the province but has been separately administered as a provincial-level _special city_ since 1946. Incheon —South Korea's third largest city—is on the coast of the province and has been similarly administered as a provincial-level _metropolitan city_ since 1981. The three jurisdictions are collectively referred to as _ Sudogwon _ and cover 11,730 km2, with a combined population of 25.5 million—amounting to over half of the entire population of South Korea
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Seoul
SEOUL (/soʊl/ ; 서울; Korean: ( listen )), officially the SEOUL SPECIAL CITY – is the capital and largest metropolis of the Republic of Korea
Korea
(commonly known as South Korea). Seoul
Seoul
is the world's 16th largest city , and forms the heart of the Seoul Capital Area , which includes the surrounding Incheon
Incheon
metropolis and Gyeonggi province. The Seoul Capital Area houses about half of the country's population of 51.44 million people with 678,102 international residents. Situated on the Han River , Seoul's history stretches back more than two thousand years when it was founded in 18 BCE by Baekje
Baekje
, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea . It continued as the capital of Korea under the Joseon Dynasty . The Seoul Capital Area contains five UNESCO World Heritage
World Heritage
Sites : Changdeok Palace
Palace
, Hwaseong Fortress , Jongmyo Shrine , Namhansanseong and the Royal Tombs of the Joseon Dynasty . Seoul
Seoul
is surrounded by mountains, the tallest being Mt. Bukhan , the world's most visited national park per square foot
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Choke Point
In military strategy, a CHOKE POINT (or CHOKEPOINT) is a geographical feature on land such as a valley, defile or a bridge or at sea such as a strait , which an armed force is forced to pass, sometimes on a substantially narrower front and therefore greatly decreasing its combat power, to reach its objective . A choke point can allow a numerically inferior defending force to thwart a larger opponent if the attacker cannot bring superior numbers to bear . CONTENTS * 1 Historical examples * 2 Royal Navy
Royal Navy
choke points * 3 Importance * 4 See also * 5 References HISTORICAL EXAMPLESSome historical examples of the tactical use of choke points are King Leonidas I 's defense of the Pass of Thermopylae during an invasion led by Xerxes I of Persia ; the Battle Of Stamford Bridge in which Harold Godwinson defeated Harald Hardrada ; William Wallace
William Wallace
's victory over the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge (Wallace had around 2,300 men against the English army of about 9,000 to 12,000 men and the bridge collapsed during the battle); and the Battle of Agincourt in which Henry V of England decisively defeated the French when they were forced to attack his smaller army through a narrow gap in the Agincourt Woods
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2nd Infantry Division (United States)
World War I
World War I
* Aisne * Aisne-Marne * St. Mihiel * Meuse-Argonne World War II
World War II
* Normandy * Northern France * Rhineland * Ardennes-Alsace * Central Europe Korean War
Korean War
* Battle of Pusan Perimeter * Battle
Battle
of the Ch\'ongch\'on River * First and Second Battles of Wonju * Battle of Chipyong-ni * Battle of Bloody Ridge * Battle of Heartbreak Ridge War on Terror * Iraq War
Iraq War
* War in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
COMMANDERS Current commander Major General Scott McKean INSIGNIA COMBAT SERVICE IDENTIFICATION BADGE DISTINCTIVE UNIT INSIGNIA OF DIV HQ, HQ BN, AND MOST OF ITS BDE LEVEL HQS FLAG 2ND ID AND 8TH ID (ROKA) COMBINED DIV HQ TAB 2ND INFANTRY DIVISION (1942–45) COMPONENTS * 9th Infantry Regiment * 23rd Infantry Regiment * 38th Infantry Regiment * 12th Field Artillery Battalion * 15th Field Artillery Battalion * 37th Field Artillery Battalion * 38th Field Artillery Battalion * 741st Tank Battalion (June 1944 – May 1945)The 2ND INFANTRY DIVISION ("Indianhead"; "2ID," "2nd ID", or "Second D") is a formation of the United States Army
United States Army

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Dongducheon
DONGDUCHEON (Korean pronunciation: ) is a city in Gyeonggi
Gyeonggi
Province, South Korea
South Korea
. The city, to the north of Seoul
Seoul
, is strategically important for the defense of the Korean capital. The main camps of the United States Second Infantry Division are in the city, and the division command is at Uijeongbu . CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Modern * 2 Statistics * 3 Climate * 4 Festivals * 5 Education * 6 U.S. Military Bases * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links HISTORYUnder Goguryeo , the dynasty's territory extended southward into Korean peninsula, and Dongducheon
Dongducheon
became part of the kingdom in the form of _naeulmae hyun_ (a certain form of ancient village land holding). Later Dongducheon
Dongducheon
became Sacheon village of Unified Silla in the North-South States Period . It was part of the district of Yangju in Goryeo
Goryeo
. MODERNIn 1963, its status was raised to that of a township, Tongducheon (eup). In 1981, Dongducheon
Dongducheon
City was established, encompassing Yangju county
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PC Bang
A PC BANG (Korean : PC방; literally "PC room") is a type of LAN gaming center in South Korea
South Korea
, where patrons can play multiplayer computer games for an hourly fee. The typical cost for an hour of play ranges from 500 to 1500 KRW (approximately $0.44 to $1.30 USD in March 2017), with 1000 KRW per hour being the most common rate. Although the per capita penetration of personal computers and broadband internet access in South Korea
South Korea
is one on the highest in the world, PC bangs remain popular as they provide a social meeting place for gamers (especially school-aged gamers) to play together with their peers. Aside from the social aspect, PC bangs' ability to offer access to expensive and powerful high-end personal computers , designed specifically for video gaming , at a comparatively low price has also bolstered their popularity. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Industry * 3 Demographics * 4 Social aspect * 5 Addiction * 6 Industry impact * 7 See also * 8 Notes HISTORYThe origin of PC bang
PC bang
starts with 전자 카페(electronic cafe) ('junja kappeh', which literally translates to 'electronic cafe') in South Korea
South Korea
opened in March 1988, which was then closed in 1991. The original creators of the junja kappeh, Ahn Sang-Soo and Geum Nu-Ree, launched this electronic cafe next to Hongik University
Hongik University

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Hagwon
HAGWON (Korean pronunciation: ) is the Korean-language word for a for-profit private institute, academy or cram school prevalent in South Korea
South Korea
. Although most widely known for their role as "cram schools", where children can study to improve scores, hagwon actually perform several educational functions: they provide supplementary education that many children need just to keep up with the regular school curriculum, remedial education for the children who fall behind in their work, training in areas not covered in schools, and preparation for students striving to improve test scores and preparing for the high school and university entrance examinations (the university entrance exam is also called suneung (수능)). Many other children, particularly younger children, attend nonacademic hagwon for piano lessons, art instruction, swimming, and taekwondo (태권도). Most young children attend a hagwon. Hagwon also play a social role, and many children, especially the younger ones, say they like going to hagwon because they are able to make new friends; many children ask to be sent because their friends attend. There are many hagwon for adults too, such as flower arrangement and driving-license hagwon. The term is also sometimes used to describe similar institutions operated by Korean Americans
Korean Americans
in the United States