HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Udaijin
Minister of the Right[1] (右大臣, Udaijin) was a government position in Japan
Japan
in the late Nara and Heian periods. The position was consolidated in the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
of 702. The Asuka Kiyomihara Code of 689 marks the initial appearance of the udaijin in the context of a central administrative body called the Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
(Council of State). This early Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
was composed of the three ministers—the daijō-daijin (Chancellor), the sadaijin (Minister of the Left) and the udaijin.[2] The udaijin was the Junior Minister of State, overseeing all branches of the Daijō-kan. He would be the deputy of the sadaijin.[3] The post of udaijin, along with the rest of the Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
structure, gradually lost power over the 10th and 11th centuries, as the Fujiwara came to dominate politics more and more
[...More...]

"Udaijin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of Japan
The first human habitation in the Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
has been traced to prehistoric times. The Jōmon period, named after its "cord-marked" pottery, was followed by the Yayoi
Yayoi
in the first millennium BC, when new technologies were introduced from continental Asia. During this period, the first known written reference to Japan
Japan
was recorded in the Chinese Book of Han
Book of Han
in the first century AD. Between the fourth century and the ninth century, Japan's many kingdoms and tribes gradually came to be unified under a centralized government, nominally controlled by the Emperor. This imperial dynasty continues to reign over Japan. In 794, a new imperial capital was established at Heian-kyō
Heian-kyō
(modern Kyoto), marking the beginning of the Heian period, which lasted until 1185
[...More...]

"History Of Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Princeton University Press
press.princeton.edu Princeton University
Princeton University
PressU.S. Historic district Contributing propertyShow map of Mercer County, New JerseyShow map of New JerseyShow map of the USLocation 41 William Street, Princeton, New JerseyCoordinates 40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Coordinates: 40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Built 1911Architect Ernest FlaggArchitectural style Collegiate GothicPart of Princeton Historic District (#75001143)Added to NRHP 27 June 1975 Princeton University
Princeton University
Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University
[...More...]

"Princeton University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cambridge University Press
Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press (CUP) is the publishing business of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the world's oldest publishing house and the second-largest university press in the world (after Oxford University Press).[2][3] It also holds letters patent as the Queen's Printer.[4] The press's mission is "To further the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence."[5] Cambridge
Cambridge
University Press is a department of the University of Cambridge
Cambridge
and is both an academic and educational publisher. With a global sales presence, publishing hubs, and offices in more than 40 countries, it publishes over 50,000 titles by authors from over 100 countries
[...More...]

"Cambridge University Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Whitney Hall
John Whitney Hall (September 13, 1916 – October 21, 1997),[1] the Tokyo-born son of missionaries in Japan, grew up to become a pioneer in the field of Japanese studies and one of the most respected historians of Japan of his generation. His life work was recognized by the Japanese government. At the time he was honored with Japan's Order of the Sacred Treasure, he was one of only a very small number of Americans to have been singled out in this way.[2] John Whitney Hall became an authority on pre-modern Japan; and he helped transform the way Western scholars view the period immediately preceding Japan's modernization as well as the thousand years before that. Professor Jeffrey Mass, a one-time student and later colleague of Hall's on the Yale faculty, described him as a quiet, self-contained man—and a master punster
[...More...]

"John Whitney Hall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
[...More...]

"OCLC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kōdansha
Kodansha
Kodansha
Ltd. (株式会社講談社, Kabushiki-gaisha Kōdansha) is a Japanese publishing company headquartered in Bunkyō, Tokyo, Japan. Kodansha
Kodansha
is the largest Japanese publishing company, and it produces the manga magazines Nakayoshi, Afternoon, Evening, and Weekly Shonen Magazine, as well as more literary magazines such as Gunzō, Shūkan Gendai, and the Japanese dictionary Nihongo Daijiten
[...More...]

"Kōdansha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imperial Household Agency
The Imperial Household Agency
Imperial Household Agency
(宮内庁, Kunai-chō) is an agency of the government of Japan
Japan
in charge of state matters concerning the Imperial Family and also keeping of the Privy Seal and State Seal of Japan
[...More...]

"Imperial Household Agency" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

List Of Daijō-daijin
The following is list of Daijō-daijin.Contents1 Nara Period 2 Heian Period 3 Kamakura Period 4 Muromachi Period 5 Azuchi-Momoyama Period 6 Edo Period 7 Meiji Period 8 See also 9 Notes 10 ReferencesNara Period[edit]703-705 Prince Osakabe (刑部親王) (?-705) - Chi-Daijō-kanji (知太政官事) 705-715 Prince Hozumi (穂積親王) (?-715) - Chi-Daijō-kanji (知太政官事) 720-735 Prince Toneri (舎人親王) (676-735) - Chi-Daijō-kanji (知太政官事) 737-745 Prince Suzuka (鈴鹿王) (?-745) - Chi-Daijō-kanji (知太政官事) 760-764 Emi no Oshikatsu (恵美押勝) (Fujiwara no Nakamaro) (藤原仲麻呂) (706-764) - Taishi (太師) 765-766
[...More...]

"List Of Daijō-daijin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sesshō And Kampaku
In Japan, Sesshō (摂政) was a title given to a regent who was named to act on behalf of either a child emperor before his coming of age, or an empress regnant. The Kanpaku (関白) was theoretically a sort of chief advisor for the emperor, but was the title of both first secretary and regent who assists an adult emperor. During a certain period in the Heian era, they were the effective rulers of Japan. There was little, if any, effective difference between the two titles, and several individuals merely changed titles as child emperors grew to adulthood, or adult emperors retired or died and were replaced by child emperors. The two titles were collectively known as Sekkan (摂関), and the families that exclusively held the titles were called Sekkan-ke or Sekkan family
[...More...]

"Sesshō And Kampaku" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kuge
The kuge (公家) was a Japanese aristocratic class that dominated the Japanese imperial court in Kyoto.[1] The kuge were important from the establishment of Kyoto
Kyoto
as the capital during the Heian period
Heian period
in the late 8th century until the rise of the Kamakura shogunate
Kamakura shogunate
in the 12th century, at which point it was eclipsed by the bushi. The kuge still provided a weak court around the Emperor until the Meiji Restoration, when they merged with the daimyo, regaining some of their status in the process, and formed the kazoku (peerage), which lasted until shortly after World War II (1947), when the Japanese peerage system was abolished
[...More...]

"Kuge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nara Period
The Nara period
Nara period
(奈良時代, Nara jidai) of the history of Japan covers the years from AD 710 to 794.[1] Empress Genmei
Empress Genmei
established the capital of Heijō-kyō
Heijō-kyō
(present-day Nara). Except for a five-year period (740–745), when the capital was briefly moved again, it remained the capital of Japanese civilization until Emperor Kanmu established a new capital, Nagaoka-kyō, in 784, before moving to Heian-kyō, or Kyoto, a decade later in 794. Most of Japanese society during this period was agricultural in nature and centered on villages
[...More...]

"Nara Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fujiwara Clan
Fujiwara
Fujiwara
clan (藤原氏, Fujiwara-uji or Fujiwara-shi), descending from the Nakatomi clan and through them Ame-no-Koyane-no-Mikoto, was a powerful family of regents in Japan.[1] The clan originated when the founder, Nakatomi no Kamatari (614–669), was rewarded by Emperor Tenji
Emperor Tenji
with the honorific "Fujiwara", which evolved as a surname for Kamatari and his descendants.[2] In time, Fujiwara
Fujiwara
became known as a clan name.[3] The Fujiwara
Fujiwara
dominated the Japanese politics of Heian period (794–1185) through the monopoly of regent positions, sesshō and kampaku.[4] The family's primary strategy for central influence was through the marrying of Fujiwara
Fujiwara
daughters to emperors
[...More...]

"Fujiwara Clan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
[...More...]

"Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.