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U.S. Treasury
The Department of the Treasury
Treasury
(USDT)[1] is an executive department and the treasury of the United States federal government. Established by an Act of Congress
Act of Congress
in 1789 to manage government revenue, its responsibilities include producing currency and coinage, collecting taxes and paying bills of the US government, managing the federal finances, supervising banks and thrifts, and advising on fiscal policy.[2] The Department is administered by the Secretary of the Treasury, who is a member of the Cabinet
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OFR (other)
The Office of Financial Research (OFR) is a unit of the United States Department of the Treasury. OFR may also refer to:O.F.R
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Battle Of Bunker Hill
United ColoniesConnecticut Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island Great BritainCommanders and leaders William Prescott Israel Putnam Joseph Warren † John Stark William Howe Thomas Gage Sir Robert Pigot James Abercrombie † Henry Clinton Samuel Graves John Pitcairn †Strength~2,400[3] 3,000+[4]Casualties and losses115 killed, 305 wounded, 30 captured (20 POWs died) Total: 450[5] 19 officers killed 62 officers wounded 207 soldiers killed 766 soldiers wounded Total: 1,054[6]The Battle of Bunker Hill
Battle of Bunker Hill
was fought on June 17, 1775, during the Siege of Boston
Siege of Boston
in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War. The battle is named after Bunker Hill in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which was peripherally involved in the battle
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Obverse And Reverse
Obverse and its opposite, reverse, refer to the two flat faces of coins and some other two-sided objects, including paper money, flags, seals, medals, drawings, old master prints and other works of art, and printed fabrics. In this usage, obverse means the front face of the object and reverse means the back face. The obverse of a coin is commonly called heads, because it often depicts the head of a prominent person, and the reverse tails. In fields of scholarship outside numismatics, the term front is more commonly used than obverse, while usage of reverse is widespread. The equivalent terms used in codicology, manuscript studies, print studies and publishing are "recto" and "verso".Contents1 Identification 2 Modern coins 3 Specific currencies3.1 Coins of the European Union 3.2 Coins of Japan 3.3 Coins of the United Kingdom 3.4 Coins of the United States4 See also 5 ReferencesIdentification[edit]This section does not cite any sources
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Mint (coinage)
A mint is an industrial facility which manufactures coins that can be used in currency. The history of mints correlates closely with the history of coins. In the beginning, hammered coinage or cast coinage were the chief means of coin minting, with resulting production runs numbering as little as the hundreds or thousands. In modern mints, coin dies are manufactured in large numbers and planchets are made into milled coins by the billions. With the mass production of currency, the production cost is weighed when minting coins
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Paper Currency
A banknote (often known as a bill, paper money, or simply a note) is a type of negotiable promissory note, made by a bank, payable to the bearer on demand. Banknotes were originally issued by commercial banks, who were legally required to redeem the notes for legal tender (usually gold or silver coin) when presented to the chief cashier of the originating bank. These commercial banknotes only traded at face value in the market served by the issuing bank.[2] Commercial banknotes have primarily been replaced by national banknotes issued by central banks. National banknotes are generally legal tender, meaning that medium of payment is allowed by law or recognized by a legal system to be valid for meeting a financial obligation.[3] Historically, banks sought to ensure that they could always pay customers in coins when they presented banknotes for payment
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United States Coinage
Coins of the United States
United States
dollar were first minted in 1792. New coins have been produced annually since then and they make up a valuable aspect of the United States
United States
currency system. Today, circulating coins exist in denominations of 1¢ (i.e. 1 cent or $0.01), 5¢, 10¢, 25¢, 50¢, and $1.00. Also minted are bullion (including gold, silver and platinum) and commemorative coins. All of these are produced by the United States
United States
Mint
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American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
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Continental Congress
The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Congress, was a convention of delegates called together from the Thirteen Colonies. It became the governing body of the United States
United States
during the American Revolution. The Congress met from 1774 to 1789 in three incarnations. The first call for a convention was made over issues of the blockade and the Intolerable Acts
Intolerable Acts
penalizing the Province of Massachusetts, which in 1774 enabled Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
to convince the colonies to form a representative body
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Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Great Britain
Great Britain, also known as Britain, is a large island in the north Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
off the northwest coast of continental Europe. With an area of 209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi), Great Britain
Great Britain
is the largest of the British Isles, the largest European island, and the ninth-largest island in the world.[5][note 1] In 2011 the island had a population of about 61 million people, making it the world's third-most populous island after Java
Java
in Indonesia and Honshu
Honshu
in Japan.[7][8] The island of Ireland
Ireland
is situated to the west of it, and together these islands, along with over 1,000 smaller surrounding islands, form the British Isles
British Isles
archipelago.[9] The island is dominated by a maritime climate with quite narrow temperature differences between seasons
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Second Continental Congress
The Second Continental Congress
Continental Congress
was a convention of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
that started meeting in the spring of 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It succeeded the First Continental Congress, which met in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
between September 5, 1774 and October 26, 1774. The Second Congress managed the Colonial war effort and moved incrementally towards independence, adopting the United States Declaration of Independence
Independence
on July 4, 1776. The Congress acted as the de facto national government of what became the United States by raising armies, directing strategy, appointing diplomats, and making formal treaties such as the Olive Branch Petition.[1] The Second Continental Congress
Continental Congress
came together on May 10, 1775, effectively reconvening the First Continental Congress
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George Washington
American Revolution Commander in Chief of the Continental ArmyValley Forge Battle of Trenton Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon
Conference 1787 Constitutional ConventionPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst term1788–89 election 1st inaugurationJudiciary Act Whiskey RebellionThanksgiving Presidential title Coinage Act Residence ActDistrict of ColumbiaSecond term1792 election 2nd inauguration Neutrality Act Jay TreatyJudicial appointments Farewell AddressLegacyLegacy Monuments Depictions Slavery Papers Library Bibliographyv t e George Washington
George Washington
(February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American statesman and soldier who served as the first President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1789 to 1797 and was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States
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George Clymer
George Clymer
George Clymer
(March 16, 1739 – January 23, 1813) was an American politician and Founding Father of the United States. He was one of the first Patriots to advocate complete independence from Britain. As a Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
representative, Clymer was, along with five others, a signatory of both the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. He attended the Continental Congress, and served in political office until the end of his life.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and family 1.2 Career2 Legacy 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and family[edit] Clymer was born in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
on 16 March 1739. Orphaned when only a year old, he was apprenticed to his maternal aunt and uncle,[1] Hannah and William Coleman, to prepare to become a merchant. He married Elizabeth Meredith on March 22, 1765
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Michael Hillegas
Michael Hillegas
Michael Hillegas
(April 22, 1729 – September 29, 1804) was the first Treasurer
Treasurer
of the United States.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Hillegas was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[2] He was the son of Margaret Schiebenstock (1710 – July 21, 1770) and George Michael Hillegass (February 14, 1696 – October 30, 1749), an immigrant from Germany[3] and a well-to-do merchant involved in iron and sugar. Soon Michael thus had the freedom and resources to participate in local politics. He married Henrietta Boude on May 10, 1753, at Christ Church in Philadelphia, and they went on to have many children
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Declaration Of Independence
A declaration of independence or declaration of statehood is an assertion by a defined territory that it is independent and constitutes a state. Such places are usually declared from part or all of the territory of another nation or failed nation, or are breakaway territories from within the larger state
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