HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Typhus
Typhus, also known as typhus fever, is a group of infectious diseases that include epidemic typhus, scrub typhus and murine typhus.[1] Common symptoms include fever, headache, and a rash.[1] Typically these begin one to two weeks after exposure.[2] The diseases are caused by specific types of bacterial infection.[1] Epidemic typhus
Epidemic typhus
is due to Rickettsia prowazekii spread by body lice, scrub typhus is due to
[...More...]

"Typhus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Black Assize Of Oxford 1577
The Black Assize is a name given to multiple deaths in the city of Oxford
Oxford
in England between 6 July and 12 August 1577. At least 300 people, including the chief baron and sheriff, are thought to have died as a result of this event. It received its name because it was believed to have been associated with a trial at the Assize Court at Oxford
Oxford
Castle.Contents1 Casualties 2 Possible causes 3 Popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 SourcesCasualties[edit] Reports vary as to the total number of deaths that occurred in the "Black Assize". The casualties in Oxford
Oxford
itself are consistently recorded as approximately 300, but some reports say that further deaths occurred outside the city
[...More...]

"Black Assize Of Oxford 1577" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World Health Organization
The World Health Organization
World Health Organization
(WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations
United Nations
that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948 headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO
WHO
is a member of the United Nations
United Nations
Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations. The constitution of the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
had been signed by 61 countries on 7 April 1948, with the first meeting of the World Health Assembly finishing on 24 July 1948. It incorporated the Office International d'Hygiène Publique and the League of Nations
League of Nations
Health Organization. Since its creation, it has played a leading role in the eradication of smallpox
[...More...]

"World Health Organization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Delirium
Delirium, also known as acute confusional state, is an organically caused decline from a previously baseline level of mental function. It often varies in severity over a short period of time, and includes attentional deficits, and disorganization of behavior. It typically involves other cognitive deficits, changes in arousal (hyperactive, hypoactive, or mixed), perceptual deficits, altered sleep-wake cycle, and psychotic features such as hallucinations and delusions. Delirium itself is not a disease, but rather a set of symptoms. It may result from an underlying disease, over-consumption of alcohol, from drugs administered during treatment of a disease, withdrawal from drugs or from any number of health factors
[...More...]

"Delirium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flea
Ceratophyllomorpha Hystrichopsyllomorpha Pulicomorpha PygiopsyllomorphaSynonymsAphanipteraFleas are small flightless insects that form the order Siphonaptera. As external parasites of mammals and birds, they live by consuming the blood of their hosts. Adults are up to about 3 mm (0.12 in) long and usually brown. Bodies flattened sideways enable them to move through their host's fur or feathers; strong claws prevent them from being dislodged. They lack wings, and have mouthparts adapted for piercing skin and sucking blood and hind legs adapted for jumping. The latter enable them to leap a distance of some 50 times their body length, a feat second only to jumps made by froghoppers. Larvae are worm-like with no limbs; they have chewing mouthparts and feed on organic debris. Over 2,500 species of fleas have been described worldwide
[...More...]

"Flea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rat
64 speciesSynonymsStenomys Thomas, 1910Rats are various medium-sized, long-tailed rodents of the superfamily Muroidea. "True rats" are members of the genus Rattus, the most important of which to humans are the black rat, Rattus rattus, and the brown rat, Rattus norvegicus. Many members of other rodent genera and families are also referred to as rats, and share many characteristics with true rats. Rats are typically distinguished from mice by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a large muroid rodent, its common name includes the term rat, while if it is smaller, the name includes the term mouse. The muroid family is broad and complex, and the common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific
[...More...]

"Rat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Human
Homo
Homo
sapiens idaltu White et al., 2003 Homo
Homo
sapiens sapiens Homo
Homo
sapiens population densitySynonyms Species
Species
synonymy[1]aethiopicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 americanus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 arabicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 aurignacensis Klaatsch & Hauser, 1910 australasicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cafer Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 capensis Broom, 1917 columbicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cro-magnonensis Gregory, 1921 drennani Kleinschmidt, 1931 eurafricanus (Sergi, 1911) grimaldiensis Gregory, 1921 grimaldii Lapouge, 1906 hottentotus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 hyperboreus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 indicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 japeticus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 melaninus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 monstrosus Linnaeus, 1758 neptunianus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 palestinus McCown & Keith, 1932 patagonus Bory de St
[...More...]

"Human" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Public Health Association
The American Public Health Association
American Public Health Association
(APHA) is a Washington, D.C.-based professional organization for public health professionals in the United States. Founded in 1872 by a group of physicians, including Dr. Stephen Smith, Dr. Henry Hartshorne, APHA has more than 25,000 members worldwide.[1] The Associations defines itself as: "APHA champions the health of all people and all communities. We Strengthen the public health profession. We speak out for public health issues and policies backed by science
[...More...]

"American Public Health Association" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chloramphenicol
Chloramphenicol
Chloramphenicol
is an antibiotic useful for the treatment of a number of bacterial infections.[3] This includes as an eye ointment to treat conjunctivitis.[4] By mouth or by injection into a vein, it is used to treat meningitis, plague, cholera, and typhoid fever.[3] Its use by mouth or by injection is only recommended when safer antibiotics cannot be used.[3] Monitoring both blood levels of the medication and blood cell levels every two days is recommended during treatment.[3] Common side effects include bone marrow suppression, nausea, and diarrhoea.[3] The bone marrow suppression may result in death.[3] To reduc
[...More...]

"Chloramphenicol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Intravenous Therapy
Intravenous therapy
Intravenous therapy
(IV) is a therapy that delivers liquid substances directly into a vein (intra- + ven- + -ous). The intravenous route of administration can be used for injections (with a syringe at higher pressures) or infusions (typically using only the pressure supplied by gravity). Intravenous infusions are commonly referred to as drips
[...More...]

"Intravenous Therapy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mississippi River
The Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
is the chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage system.[13][14] The stream is entirely within the United States
United States
(although its drainage basin reaches into Canada), its source is in northern Minnesota
Minnesota
and it flows generally south for 2,320 miles (3,730 km)[14] to the Mississippi
Mississippi
River
River
Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. With its many tributaries, the Mississippi's watershed drains all or parts of 31 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces between the Rocky and Appalachian Mountains. The Mississippi
Mississippi
ranks as the fourth-longest and fifteenth-largest river in the world by discharge
[...More...]

"Mississippi River" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Meningoencephalitis
Meningoencephalitis
Meningoencephalitis
(/mɪˌnɪŋɡoʊɛnˌsɛfəˈlaɪtɪs, -ˌnɪndʒoʊ-, -ən-, -ˌkɛ-/;[1][2] from Greek μῆνιγξ meninx, "membrane", ἐγκέφαλος, enképhalos "brain", and the medical suffix -itis, "inflammation") is a medical condition that simultaneously resembles both meningitis, which is an infection or inflammation of the meninges, and encephalitis, which is an infection or inflammation of the brain.Contents1 Causes1.1 Bacterial 1.2 Viral 1.3 Other/multiple 1.4 Protozoal 1.5 Animal2 Treatment 3 Prognosis 4 Notable cases 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 References<
[...More...]

"Meningoencephalitis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sylvatic Cycle
The sylvatic cycle, also enzootic or sylvatic transmission cycle, is a portion of the natural transmission cycle of a pathogen. Sylvatic means occurring in or affecting wild animals. The sylvatic cycle is the fraction of the pathogen population's lifespan spent cycling between wild animals and vectors. Humans are usually an incidental or dead-end host, infected by a vector. This is opposed to a "domestic" or "urban" cycle, in which the pathogen cycles between vectors and non-wild, urban, or domestic animals; humans may have differing infection rates from these cycles due to transmission efficiencies and environmental exposure levels.[1][2] Examples of pathogens that contain a sylvatic cycle include trichinosis,[3] dengue viruses,[4] Yersinia pestis,[2] and Chagas disease.[1][5] See also[edit] Sylvatic plagueReferences[edit]^ a b Fernandes O, Mangia RH, Lisboa CV, et al. (1999)
[...More...]

"Sylvatic Cycle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Civilian Public Service
The Civilian Public Service
Civilian Public Service
(CPS) was a program of the United States government that provided conscientious objectors with an alternative to military service during World War II. From 1941 to 1947, nearly 12,000 draftees, willing to serve their country in some capacity but unwilling to perform any type of military service, accepted assignments in work of national importance in 152 CPS camps throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. Draftees from the historic peace churches and other faiths worked in areas such as soil conservation, forestry, fire fighting, agriculture, under the supervision of such agencies as the U.S. Forest Service, the Soil Conservation Service, and the National Park Service. Others helped provide social services and mental health services. The CPS men served without wages and minimal support from the federal government
[...More...]

"Civilian Public Service" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gulfport, Mississippi
Gulfport is the second largest city in Mississippi
Mississippi
after the state capital, Jackson. It is the larger of the two principal cities of the Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi
Mississippi
Metropolitan Statistical Area,[3] which is included in the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula, Mississippi
Mississippi
Combined Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the city of Gulfport had a total population of 67,793. Gulfport is co-county seat with Biloxi of Harrison County, Mississippi. Gulfport is also home to the US Navy Atlantic Fleet Seabees.[4]Contents1 History1.1 Hurricane Katrina2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics 4 Economy4.1 Top employers5 Arts and culture5.1 Tourism6 Education 7 Media 8 Infrastructure8.1 Air 8.2 Law enforcement8.2.1 State and Federal 8.2.2 Gulfport Police 8.2.3 U.S
[...More...]

"Gulfport, Mississippi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moors
The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim
Muslim
inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta
Malta
during the Middle Ages
[...More...]

"Moors" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.